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2x06 - Revolution 9

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Thu 7 Jul - 23:25

Aquarius recap: 'Revolution 9'

Sam is pulled into the history books when Robert F. Kennedy enters the race

by Kelly Connolly • @_kellyQ


(Vivian Zink/NBC)

Aquarius

Season 2, Ep. 6 | Aired Jul 07

Posted July 8 2016 — 2:00 AM EDT

A few weeks ago, Sam Hodiak was in the kitchen of a seedy bar, whipping up some scrambled eggs for a guy whose head he’d later hold over the stove… and now he’s leading Robert F. Kennedy into the kitchen of The Ambassador Hotel. That only looks like an upgrade. Unless Aquarius plans on significantly altering history — and it doesn’t, because Charlie’s still here — we all know how this story ends. But the tense cliffhanger works anyway, and not only because the assassination is sure to send Sam to a somehow-even-darker place. It also raises questions about Ken, who probably had a hand in the murder.

As the Nixon campaign scrambles to deal with Bobby Kennedy’s late bid for the presidency, Ken is torn. On the one hand, he wants his candidate to win, and Kennedy poses the most serious threat. On the other, Ken is into him. He watches Kennedy on TV all day and calls him “a beauty.” He sympathizes with the family’s loss. In the minutes before Kennedy is shot, Ken shakes his hand and wishes him good luck, then lights up when Kennedy thanks him. Ken is definitely attracted to Robert Kennedy, a development I personally am very excited to compartmentalize. But he’s also meeting in secret with an FBI agent (he’s into him, too) who’s more than willing to “hurt Bobby.” The evidence doesn’t lie.

And it all intersects with Sam, who’s called in when the rain uncovers a body that might be Tina Greenwood’s. A positive ID is going to take a while (ah, ‘60s forensics), but Sam hauls in prime suspect Ben Healey for questioning anyway. He sets Shafe on the kid, instructing the new detective to mess with Ben’s head by eating his doughnut (“Get your nasty cooties all over it”) and pretending to be on his side. Ben admits he and a friend went to two football games after graduation, where they could have met then-cheerleader Tina, but the “friend” whose info Ben gives Shafe is actually his lawyer — who is also his uncle. No one this crafty can be innocent.

Ben might be smarter than Shafe, whose drug problem is getting worse. He’s feverish and pale at the precinct; he told Kristin it was the flu, but he almost comes clean with Sam. In the face of Shafe’s muttered, “This ain’t the flu,” Sam seems concerned, but he looks the other way (come on, Sam) and tells his partner to go get some sleep before the whole department catches his cold. Shafe shoots up in a cinderblock room instead. Back home, he does a terrible job at acting anything other than high in front of Kristin, who checks his bag the next morning while he sleeps and finds his needle. There had better be a call to Sam in her future.

Meanwhile, Sam is out doing favors for an old army buddy, Sean Boyle, who’s being blackmailed for seeing prostitutes. Sam looks into the prostitutes and their pimp, but no one has motive — Boyle gives them so much of his money already. When he visits Boyle’s home to break the news that the blackmailer must be someone else, Sam gets a moment alone with Boyle’s wife, Mary, and figures it out: She knows, and she wrote the letters not to get money, but to watch her husband suffer through his panic and guilt. He has no idea.

Boyle’s been too busy with his own agenda; he wants Sam to join Kennedy’s security team. Sam shoots down the offer, insisting he can’t moonlight, but Boyle corners him into a meeting with the senator anyway. In the glare of cameras and reporters, Kennedy asks Sam what can be done “on both sides” to improve relations between the black community and the cops. Sam deflects, giving a non-answer when Kennedy insists. “Nothing can be done,” Sam says. “People don’t change. There are good ones and bad ones. It’s my job to keep the bad away from the good. That’s all I can do.” That’s a pretty apt summary of Sam’s worldview, but the man did just help the community avoid riots a few weeks ago. He probably has a few thoughts — just none he feels he should share with reporters in the room.

Sam finds himself back in Kennedy’s presence when Martin O’Reilly, the pimp who profited from Boyle’s infidelities, goes missing. Boyle put out a hit on O’Reilly as soon as he had his name; by the time Sam told him the pimp wasn’t his blackmailer, it was already too late. Boyle isn’t especially remorseful when Sam confronts him at The Ambassador Hotel, where Kennedy is celebrating a victory in the California primary. Sam tells Boyle that Mary is behind the letters, but there isn’t much time for the news to sink in; the crowd is too big to take Kennedy out the front, and Boyle needs Sam’s help. Sam tells Boyle they can pull the cars around to the service entrance; they’ll take Kennedy through the kitchen.

Kennedy shakes Sam’s hand again, and Sam leads him through the back of the hotel, which is still crowded enough that no one notices Sirhan Sirhan as he makes his approach. Ken shakes Kennedy’s hand, probably as a distraction; a minute later, Sirhan is pushing his way through the crowds. He pulls out his gun. Sam wheels around at the sound of the weapon cocking, and you can consult your local history book to find out how this one’s going to end. The real surprise is how closely our characters are orbiting the major events of the late 1960s. Sam isn’t just being shaped by history; he’s shaping it.

Sirhan isn’t even the only infamous murderer at The Ambassador tonight. Charlie wants Terry to listen to his music, and he gets what he’s after by demanding the producer’s attention in the creepiest possible way (grabbing the back of Terry’s neck while he’s having sex with a few of Charlie’s “girls”). Terry suggests Charlie play at his candidate’s victory celebration, but Charlie can’t figure out whether Terry supports Kennedy or McCarthy. He tries to get Emma to find out for him, sending her to sleep with fellow producer Gregg Jakobson and slapping her face when she dares to ask a question. For some reason, Emma doesn’t walk out for good, but at least she seems to resist Charlie’s orders; when primary night rolls around, they still don’t know who Terry supports.

Charlie plays his song for Dennis instead, and it vastly exceeds the previous standards set by “Garbage Dump.” It’s not a great song, but it’s solidly okay; Dennis, a solidly okay person, is moved to tears. He tells Charlie he’ll record the song if Terry won’t. Then again, he sounds like he’s messing with Charlie when he tells him the only thing he knows about Terry’s political preferences: “Terry said that he likes the dude who really, really hates, I mean just really hates the war.” Is he testing Charlie? If he is, Charlie fails; he, Emma, and Dennis find Gregg at The Ambassador, where he tells them Terry supported McCarthy. Since McCarthy’s party isn’t a victory celebration, Charlie hasn’t missed the opportunity to play, but by the time the night is over, he might wind up with inspiration of a much darker kind.

Bits and pieces:

  • Grace gives a well-received speech at the National Federation of Republican Women, and it gives her a taste for politics. She just wants to feel like she’s good at something; if that can’t be motherhood, maybe it can be lying about how good she is at motherhood.

  • “I don’t want it now.” —Charlie, a worse Lucille Bluth

  • “Filbert?”

  • “Here’s the real play: Eat his doughnut.”

  • “Those are double negatives. I understand they can be confusing.”


EW.com

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 2:56

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 3:08

Link for download episode.

File Size: 202.84MB

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Jul - 3:41


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 9:13

Aquarius – Season 2, Episode 6: “Revolution 9”






NBC’s Aquarius
Season 2, Episode 6: “Revolution 9”
Directed by Jonas Pate
Written by Rafael Yglesias



At 10050 Cielo Drive on August 9th of 1969, a maid makes her way up to the house. First, she finds the wires on the gate speaker cut. On the door is scrawled PIG in red. Further inside waits unimaginable horror.

We jump back 16 months previous. The same maid finds herself the subject of nasty racism at the hands of none other than Charles Manson (Gethin Anthony). No surprise there. Meanwhile, Charlie’s not happy with much that’s going on at the home of Dennis Wilson (Andy Favreau). He orders his girls around, mostly pimping them out.



In other news, Detectives Brian Shafe (Grey Damon) and Sam Hodiak (David Duchovny) are finding out what they can about the missing girl they’ve found, now dead and rotted away in a makeshift grave. At the same time, Ken Karn (Brian F. O’Byrne) is getting information on Bobby Kennedy, likely up to no good behind the scenes. He’s glued to the television and obviously worried about the threat of this Kennedy for his man Richard Nixon. Ah, political intrigue! I’ve always dug this Karn plot. Not only is O’Byrne a great actor, the character itself is well written and full of good threads to follow.

Back with Hodiak and Shafe, they’re trying to interrogate Ben Healy (Morgan McClellan) a bit. What we see here, above all else, is the fact Shafe is already starting to become that guy he never wanted to become, the one his wife Kristin (Milauna Jackson) fears he’ll be with that detective shield on.





Producer Terry Melcher (Chase Coleman) is getting pulled further into the world of Manson, as the latter works his devious ways to get what he wants, and to con others into thinking they’re getting what they desire. Greasy, slick bastard.

In jail, Healy’s talking a bit. But there’s more going on with Shafe than his job. He’s still sweating, his whole demeanour is shaky. He is not himself. And we’ve already seen the foreshadowing of his nasty addiction. We’re going to have to watch his downward spiral, which sort of pains me. I like this guy. I’d like to see him kick the demons, though clearly there’s only more trouble in his future. Even worse, if Hodiak figures everything out he won’t be happy.

Speaking of Sam, he’s over chatting with some union cats. They’re big fans of Kennedy, by the way. Well one of Hodiak’s buddies is being blackmailed by a prostitute. He worries, obviously, for his children, his wife, the integrity of the union and all kinds of things. Reluctantly, Sam agrees to do the job. Only thing is I’m not sure his morality is so free as it was before. He doesn’t look too pleased with having to track down a woman and… do who knows what to keep her silent.

Shafe is still grilling Healy trying to get more out of him. He’s following more rules of the non-official police handbook from Dt. Hodiak, too. Maybe, just maybe, it works.




Manson gets a little of what he wants from Melcher with the promise of more. But you can be sure that either he’ll sabotage things unwillingly himself, or it won’t pan out how he envisions it.

Back to the politics, Grace Karn (Michaela McManus) is starting to dip her feet in. She’s asked to introduce Mrs. Nixon before a luncheon for the National Federation of Republican Women due to her husband Ken “working” for Nixon. When she’s courted afterwards to possibly take a more active role, Grace is presented with either lying or telling the truth about where her daughter Emma (Emma Dumont) is currently. She’s over being slapped around by Charlie Manson, told what to do, where to go, all that sort of thing; even her name Grace is no more, she’s Cherry.

Finally, Hodiak looks like he’s cluing in to what is going on with Shafe when the younger of the two mumbles: “This ain‘t the flu.” In the meantime, Sam keeps at Healy, and starts trying to work more out of the guy. Nothing comes, except his lawyer. Now there’s more complaints headed Hodiak’s way, but he’s still convinced there is some guilt kicking around. And instead of going home, Shafe simply goes for another shot of horse, getting high as a kite in a dirty little room by himself.

  

Ken meets an Agent Bill Copley (Joe Williamson) at a hotel bar. Lots of undercover talk about Nixon, Hoover, dirt of Bobby Kennedy, and all that. Very clandestine, Deep Throat-type stuff. But there’s more than that at hand. Is there some type of relationship between these two? Ken says he looks “fit” and laments not getting a call after Copley came to town. Yowzahs. No wonder he thought Kennedy was a handsome fella.

At home, Brian and Kristin are at odds. She continually finds the change in him disruptive, disappointing above anything. Hodiak calls to let Shafe know the story on Healy. Mostly, we see how Brian is alienating his wife, he’s beginning to slip up slightly in his job. Everything is crumbling. He’s the only one that doesn’t seem to notice. Because not long after Kristin discovers her husband’s secret junkie kit.

Out on his moonlighting gig, Hodiak brings an old buddy a lunch, Detective Blumenthal (Matthew Arkin). He gets a bit of low down on the prostitutes which he seeks out: they’ve got the same pimp, a guy named Martin O’Reilly (Ryan Caldwell). During the whole debacle Sam meets Bobby Kennedy (Scott Bailey), who asks about race relations involving the African-American community: “It‘s my job to keep the bad away from the good. That‘s all I can do,” Hodiak tells him.



Eventually Hodiak tracks down O’Reilly. For his part the pimp denies any blackmail. Because why would he ruin a good client? Either way, Hodiak cracks his nose open on the steering wheel: “You‘re still a pimp,” he says before getting out and letting a couple other detectives take the guy in – or are they someone else? So Hodiak goes back to his buddy, asking for more info. He ends up sitting for a hot beverage with the wife. She seems to let on that there’s more to her husband than appears at first, and she is the one that’s putting the screws to her husband. Good woman. Fuck that cheating slime.

Awhile later Sam discovers O’Reilly is now a missing person. Uh oh. Hodiak doesn’t like that his old buddy he tried helping basically used him to find the pimp, then did something… intense. Being an army pal from long ago doesn’t ensure Hodiak’s undying loyalty.
At the Wilson mansion, Charlie plays a new song for the Beach Boy. Over this we watch a montage of various scenes, including Brian and his destroyed living room along with Kristin’s disapproving look, Grace quietly worrying for her daughter, and Hodiak receives another envelope with RFK’S #1 DETECTIVE written across it, a new picture inside. And after Charlie finishes playing there’s a look behind Dennis’ eyes that speaks wonders. He finds it amazing, which pleases Manson plenty.



Hodiak winds up doing his part to help get Bobby Kennedy out of the hotel where he made an appearance. Out through the doors they go and you know what’s coming, don’t you?

A man walks from out of the crowd, pulls a gun, then….

Cut to August 9th of ’69 again. The maid comes barrelling out of the house on Cielo Drive, trying to scream “murder” but barely with a voice.






What a CRAZY, amazing episode! I love this show. I don’t care what the ratings say, or what other internet sites are saying: it’s awesome. While it takes liberties with Manson and other events, there’s a really fun, exciting, and fresh feel to Aquarius coupled with great performances from the cast. Excited for the next episode titled “Piggies” and I can’t wait to see what comes from the fallout of Bobby Kennedy’s assassination, particularly see as how Hodiak was right there at the scene. Stay tuned, fellow fans.

Fathersonholygore.com

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Jul - 10:06


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 12:13

‘Aquarius’ S2: E06 ‘Revolution 9’ Review


Review Score: 7 / 10


Aquarius (TV Series) (2015)
As Shafe’s (Grey Damon) struggles with addiction continue, Hodiak (David Duchovny) tracks down a blackmailer, and Grace (Michaela McManus) gets more involved in politics.



**Spoiler Alert**

This review contains spoilers for S2E06 of Aquarius. If you haven’t watched, read at your own risk.



The Good


The flashforwards move to the aftermath. It looks like last week’s episode might have been the last we get of the events during the murders in 1969 since tonight’s flashbacks focus on the morning after and the housekeeper discovering the scene. This is interesting since we’ve only seen bits and pieces of the night the murder took place. We still don’t know how involved Emma was in the night’s events, and with only getting brief glimpses of her, a lot of it is left up to our interpretation until the show puts the pieces together. It’s a nice tease.

More Grace. I’m so relieved to see Grace get a storyline other than being the woman hanging out at Hodiak’s home or the woman trying to figure out just what her husband was up to. Given the family Grace grew up in and the fact that her husband works on the Nixon campaign, it’s no surprise that the organization she gets involved with to fill her days is specifically for Republican women. The speech she gives isn’t particularly inspired to a modern audience, but it’s clear that as she starts talking, she thinks she might have found the place where she fits in.


Shafe’s got a serious problem. As his time interrogating a suspect goes on and he follows Hodiak’s instructions, Grey Damon plays Shafe as more and more agitated. The makeup department also does a great job at making him appear sweaty and pale. It’s clear to anyone familiar with drug use what’s happening to Shafe, but Hodiak keeps telling him he’s sick and needs to get better. Because Hodiak always seems to know what’s going on, a part of me suspects that Hodiak knows exactly what’s wrong with his new partner, especially since his wife isn’t blind and figures it out relatively quickly.


Ben Heely is clever. While Hodiak thinks he’s going to get some information from an old classmate of his suspect, it turns out the name and number the suspect gave was for his uncle, who also happens to be his lawyer, something Hodiak only realizes after the guy is already at the police station. It’s a clever twist that a modern police drama wouldn’t be able to do.


Emma is clearly no longer happy. We see a very different Emma in this episode than we have in the past with Charlie, and Charlie treats her differently as well. Emma isn’t just being shamed when he’s upset with her anymore, but he actually slaps her. It’s clear that she doesn’t want to just be one of Charlie’s girls anymore as she hesitates when he asks her to reel in a new man. She wants a relationship with Dennis, but they’re both firmly in Charlie’s grasp, and it’s easy to see how she ends up caught in the middle of everything to come.



The Bad

The editing is choppier than usual. Usually the transitions from one storyline to the other are effortless, or they’re broken up by commercial breaks to make them appear smoother. Tonight, the transitions seem choppy as we jump from scene to scene. I can’t tell if it’s because the episode was trimmed to fit the timeslot or if something else was going on.


No Charmaine. Any time the show abandons Charmaine’s undercover work in favor of stuffing two or three more stories into an episode, the show suffers. I wish the show wouldn’t try to do so much in such a short amount of time. Including Charmaine in the anti-war presidential candidate’s party would have been more believable to me than Hodiak and Ken ending up their.


Hodiak and Ken both have Kennedy connections. I could maybe buy Ken wanting to see Bobby Kennedy in person. But I don’t like the idea that two of the characters so prevalent in the series just happened to be at the scene where Bobby Kennedy was shot. I actually found the effort to reintegrate Ken into the storyline after not seeing him since the premiere very forced, though I did like the scene between him and Grace where they seemed to shift more towards allies and friends than forced cohabitors.


The Questions

Will Grace end up in politics? She seems to think she’s found her niche, though she’s more likely trying to fill the void left by Emma.


What happened to Tex? Last we saw him, he and Sadie seemed to be exclusive, but she was busy helping Charlie out with record executives tonight. We know he’s involved with the murders to come, but what is he up to now?


Will Hodiak solve the missing girls case before the season ends? It’s one of the few stories that’s been a throughline this season, and I’d rather seen progress on that every week instead of the other cases forced in.




Grading the episode: Not as sharp, or as fun, as the usual episodes of the show, I felt like this episode is acting as a bridge to the rest of the season. It seemed more like there was an effort to include as much as possible to get to the next point. C




The Movie Net Work


Last edited by sir on Sat 9 Jul - 17:15; edited 1 time in total

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Jul - 12:13


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 12:14




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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Jul - 12:18


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Fri 8 Jul - 16:59

“Revolution 9” and 6 Times Hodiak Had Good Reason to Hate Everything On Last Night's Aquarius
(Episode 2.06)



Aquarius has picked up the pace significantly this season. Diving headlong into the downward spiral that lead to the real life Manson Family murders means that the drama and intrigue seem to fly by, episode to episode. And while the historical speculation may move the plot, let us not forget that ultimately Aquarius’s central story is that of the trials and tribulations of Sam Hodiak, and his seemingly perpetual inability to catch a break. Here are the 6 times that made us wish Hodiak was familiar with the phrase “face palm” in last night’s Aquarius.


1. “I’m being blackmailed by a hooker.”
It’s always nice to hear from an old friend. College roommates and military service buddies get a lot of mileage when it comes to moving a television show’s plot along, especially when trying to establish a connection to otherwise untouchable celebrity characters. And what better use of that plot device than to have said friend introduce you to Bobby Kennedy?

Except of course for Hodiak, a meet up with his old war buddy, Boyle, can’t possible be that straightforward. Swinging by to talk about a job working as a pre-presidential bodyguard is one thing, but finding out your good friend wants you to track down and threaten the prostitute that’s blackmailing them? That’s the kind of favor that requires more than just a phone call on your birthday and a one-episode guest appearance.


2. “You didn’t go to high school with Ben Healy”
No one likes being outsmarted, especially when you suspect you’re the smartest guy in the room. And yet, it does seem to happen quiet a lot around here.

Hodiak’s extreme desire to smack tonight’s high and easily manipulated Shafe over the head is pretty understandable when the revelation of Ben Healy’s uncle/lawyer/ex-roomate finds its way down to the police station. Sam, sometimes the manipulation tactics you rely on so heavily will come back to bite you. Still it takes a manipulator to know a manipulator, and Sam’s parting shot of, “Your client’s way too smart to be innocent,” pretty much assures me that Healy is the man they’re looking for. Hmmmm, it’s always the quiet ones.


3. “He’s decent for a pimp…”
When you find yourself in a conversation comparing the management practices of pimps, you have to get the sense that rock bottom isn’t very far away. This one’s pretty self explanatory, even if Martin O’Reilly did turn out to be relatively decent. For a pimp.


4. “Are you gonna tell him or should I?”
Personally, I would have enjoyed it if they’d told him together, but that may have felt a little too much like a prostitute intervention. Finding out that Boyle was visiting prostitutes at least three times a week makes it pretty clear that his life isn’t really all that together though, so maybe it wouldn’t have hurt.

Sam’s buddy is set up pretty early on as one lacking any kind of self-awareness. He even goes so far as to justify visiting prostitutes as some kind of living memorial to who his wife used to be, by only frequenting “Irish girls.” So maybe the revelation that these prostitutes were very much not Irish should have been the first hint that Boyle isn’t exactly aware of the other people around him.

Finding out that his blackmailer is actually his sweet, devoted wife Mary may not come as a shock to us, but for Hodiak it’s just one more reason he should have taken the day off.


5.“I don’t really have any ideas, sir.”
As a general rule, we tend to be an optimistic sort in the United States. We’re always looking for solutions. For a natural pessimist like Sam, that can prove a bit frustrating and awkward. Imagine being the only person working on a group project who can foresee all the ways in which it could fail, and you’ll have a pretty clear insight into Sam Hodiak’s point of view.

Now imagine that instead of your ninth grade English teacher asking you to explain Nathaniel Hawthorne, it’s the future president of the United States asking for your advice about how to improve race relations in 1969. If you’re a dedicated pessimist (he’d probably say realist) like Sam, you probably can’t imagine a more awkward situation. So try dodging the question, and when Bobby’s too pushy to accept a well phrased, “I don’t know” try to tap that nihilism down. Because no politician wants to hear “People don’t change.” And then, not only are you wrong, but you’re wrong in the national news.


6.”You gotta help us, Sammy. He’s gonna be the next president, Sammy.”
It’s never good when someone makes an impassioned plea to you by adding your name to the end of every sentence. It pretty much screams “disaster waiting to happen.”

For all my history buffs out there, you’re already aware of how this Kennedy story ends. For those less factually inclined, I think the final shot of tonight’s episode makes it pretty clear where this is going. It’s just another opportunity for Sam to look at the crumbling world around him and shrug out a heavy sigh. Because for Sam Hodiak, people really don’t change. The justifications and excuses just get more complicated.

Katherine Siegel is a Chicago-based writer and director, and a regular contributor to Paste. You can find out more by checking out her website at www.KatherineSiegel.com or follow her on “Twitter”:https://twitter.com/Katealily

Pastemagazine.com

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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Jul - 17:03


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by sir on Mon 11 Jul - 3:22


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Re: 2x06 - Revolution 9

Post by jade1013 on Mon 11 Jul - 4:06


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