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Manson wasn't a revolutionary, he was an aberration

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Manson wasn't a revolutionary, he was an aberration

Post by jade1013 on Wed 6 Jul - 8:48

Manson wasn't a revolutionary, he was an aberration, says Aquarius star David Duchovny

Date July 7, 2016 - 12:00AM  
Michael Idato
Entertainment Editor-at-Large, Los Angeles


David Duchovny as LAPD detective Sam Hodiak in Aquarius. Photo: NBC

The long shadow of notorious American serial killer Charles Manson, whose ascendant personality dominates the narrative of the television series Aquarius, is a misleading contradiction, says the show's star David Duchovny.

The history books mistakenly conflate Manson's madness and genuine social revolution, to the detriment of the latter. "You watch the 1960s which opened with such great hope, where you had these social movements based on unrest and good thinking and good philosophies, coming to a dark close," Duchovny says.

"You had the black movement, you had the Hispanic movement, you had the gay movement, you had women's rights, you had all these social unrest movements happening, movements that were getting stuff done and then you get Manson and society kind of shuts down after that, it was like, this is where it's all going," he says.


David Duchovny in season two of Aquarius. Photo: Presto

In truth, despite presenting as a hippie, and advocating "peace and love", Manson became a cautionary tale used by the establishment media of the day as a showcase for the endgame of the 1960s. "It ends in crazy, drug-fuelled murder, which is obviously not the case but that's the case as historicised," Duchovny says.

In the end, he adds, Manson was little more than a conman. "It's kind of sad to me that he was held up as the apotheosis of the 1960s when in fact he's just an aberration."

In Aquarius, Duchovny plays LAPD detective Sam Hodiak who finds himself enmeshed in a tangle of cases which all seem to lead to hippie bandmaster Charles Manson (Gethin Anthony).

Born in 1960, Duchovny says he, like many Americans of that era, grew up with an awareness of the Manson story. "I was somewhat aware of the case as it happened even though it was more of a west coast thing," he says. "Back then, on the east coast where I grew up, I think we heard of him but there wasn't this obsession.

"I think much like the O. J. Simpson case, everybody gets their crime of the century," he adds. "Other countries have their crimes of the century. We seem to have multiple crimes of the century. The Lindberg baby, then we had Manson, then Son of Sam. Of course this year it's the candidacy of Donald Trump."



The appeal of the Manson story, and its enduring place in American popular culture seems inexplicable. Duchovny says his appeal – if that's even the right word – sits perhaps in the fact that there were various strands of the story which people found compelling.

"You had these young girls who were runaways and you had these people talk about free love up there in the ranch, and you had a cult, you had this idea that people murdered for somebody else, that he was this, this super pimp," he says.

"There's just a lot of different angles that are fascinating to people when in fact it's probably just a sad, sad story," he adds.

"You have kids who are runaways and don't have authority figures, they got manipulated by a conman who was really a Scientologist, which unfortunately we don't talk about very much. But to me that's also another really interesting part of the story that we don't get into because everybody's so terrified of those people."

The strength of Sam Hodiak, Duchovny says, lies in the fact that he is a man with a strong moral certainty, living in a time when society's moral compass is shifting.

"He's very much a person that does what he thinks is right regardless of whether other people think it's right," Duchovny says. "He doesn't care so much about what people think about him. He's kind of an anti-hero in that way. You could draw a similar line to Mulder or Hank Moody or a lot of other things that I've done, I guess."

For Duchovny, the attraction is to "a character who has a sense of their own morality, their own code. Characters that kind of make up their own code, here you've got a cop who's got his code written for him, which is the law, but he's still making it up and that's interesting to me."

In the first season finale, Hodiak (Duchovny) shot down two men in a standoff, though there is a lingering question over whether he used excessive force. Anxious to avoid a scandal, the police department awards him a medal of valour, though a sting in the tail is delivered when, during the medal ceremony, Hodiak learns there is a witness to the shooting.

"We pick up literally the same day, same night, we have ongoing strands of story," says Duchovny. "We're an ongoing kind of serial, a kind of soap opera, a police procedural with the dark cloud of the Manson case hanging over it or beside it in this case."

In the first season there was a high level of engagement between Hodiak's own story, and the story of Charles Manson. In the second, Duchovny says, the two worlds are more parallel. "It's almost like they're two concurrent worlds that are happening for the first eight or nine episodes and then they start to go on a collision course again," he says.

The feedback loop for an actor in Hollywood is a complex beast at the best of times, and for Duchovny it's difficult to navigate because several of his key roles, including The X Files' Fox Mulder and Californication's Hank Moody, have retained powerful followings long after the series in which they starred were laid to rest.

"Fans are very different," he says. "Fans are fans of the shows, fans of me. Fans kind of like to mix everything together. They always seem to be saying things like, can't Hodiak and Mulder go do something. Or what happens if Hank was a cop."

It is easier, he says, to remain focused on Aquarius and see it as "something that stands in its own world, on its own merit. I'm just focused on telling this particular story; it's a period show but the issues that we deal with historically in this show are actually issues that are very relevant today."

The feedback loop from his family is much easier to navigate. "My family doesn't talk to me about my work ever, as it should be," he says, smiling wryly.

WHAT Aquarius, season 2

WHEN Streaming on Presto


The Sydney Morning Herald

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Re: Manson wasn't a revolutionary, he was an aberration

Post by sir on Wed 6 Jul - 8:52

Thanks

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Aquarius' David Duchovny compares Trump candidacy to rise of Charles

Post by sir on Sun 10 Jul - 15:54

Aquarius' David Duchovny compares Trump candidacy to rise of Charles Manson



Gethin Anthony, left, as Charles Manson and David Duchovny as homicide cop Sam Hodiak have already had some close encounters in Aquarius.


David Duchovny stars as LAPD detective Sam Hodiak in Aquarius.

"You watch the 1960s which opened with such great hope, where you had these social movements based on unrest and good thinking and good philosophies, coming to a dark close," Duchovny says.

"You had the black movement, you had the Hispanic movement, you had the gay movement, you had women's rights, you had all these social unrest movements happening, movements that were getting stuff done and then you get Manson and society kind of shuts down after that, it was like, this is where it's all going," he says.

In truth, despite presenting as a hippie, and advocating "peace and love", Manson became a cautionary tale used by the establishment media of the day as a showcase for the endgame of the 1960s. "It ends in crazy, drug-fuelled murder, which is obviously not the case but that's the case as historicised," Duchovny says.

In the end, he adds, Manson was little more than a conman. "It's kind of sad to me that he was held up as the apotheosis of the 1960s, when in fact he's just an aberration."

In Aquarius, Duchovny plays LAPD detective Sam Hodiak, who finds himself enmeshed in a tangle of cases which all seem to lead to hippie bandmaster Charles Manson (Gethin Anthony).

Born in 1960, Duchovny says he, like many Americans of that era, grew up with an awareness of the Manson story.

"I was somewhat aware of the case as it happened even though it was more of a west coast thing," he says. "Back then, on the east coast where I grew up, I think we heard of him but there wasn't this obsession.

"I think much like the O. J. Simpson case, everybody gets their crime of the century," he adds. "Other countries have their crimes of the century. We seem to have multiple crimes of the century. The Lindberg baby, then we had Manson, then Son of Sam. Of course, this year it's the candidacy of Donald Trump."

The appeal of the Manson story, and its enduring place in American popular culture seems inexplicable. Duchovny says his appeal – if that's even the right word – sits perhaps in the fact that there were various strands of the story which people found compelling.

"You had these young girls who were runaways and you had these people talk about free love up there in the ranch, and you had a cult, you had this idea that people murdered for somebody else, that he was this, this super pimp," he says.

"There's just a lot of different angles that are fascinating to people when in fact it's probably just a sad, sad story," he adds.

"You have kids who are runaways and don't have authority figures, they got manipulated by a conman who was really a Scientologist, which unfortunately we don't talk about very much. But to me that's also another really interesting part of the story that we don't get into because everybody's so terrified of those people."

The strength of Sam Hodiak, Duchovny says, lies in the fact that he is a man with a strong moral certainty, living in a time when society's moral compass is shifting.

"He's very much a person that does what he thinks is right regardless of whether other people think it's right," Duchovny says. "He doesn't care so much about what people think about him. He's kind of an anti-hero in that way. You could draw a similar line to Mulder or Hank Moody, or a lot of other things that I've done, I guess."

For Duchovny, the attraction is to "a character who has a sense of their own morality, their own code. Characters that kind of make up their own code, here you've got a cop who's got his code written for him, which is the law, but he's still making it up and that's interesting to me."

In the first season finale, Hodiak (Duchovny) shot down two men in a standoff, though there is a lingering question over whether he used excessive force. Anxious to avoid a scandal, the police department awards him a medal of valour, though a sting in the tail is delivered when, during the medal ceremony, Hodiak learns there is a witness to the shooting.

"We pick up literally the same day, same night, we have ongoing strands of story," says Duchovny. "We're an ongoing kind of serial, a kind of soap opera, a police procedural with the dark cloud of the Manson case hanging over it or beside it in this case."

In the first season there was a high level of engagement between Hodiak's own story, and the story of Charles Manson. In the second, Duchovny says, the two worlds are more parallel. "It's almost like they're two concurrent worlds that are happening for the first eight or nine episodes and then they start to go on a collision course again," he says.

The feedback loop for an actor in Hollywood is a complex beast at the best of times, and for Duchovny it's difficult to navigate because several of his key roles, including The X Files' Fox Mulder and Californication's Hank Moody, have retained powerful followings long after the series in which they starred were laid to rest.

"Fans are very different," he says. "Fans are fans of the shows, fans of me. Fans kind of like to mix everything together. They always seem to be saying things like, can't Hodiak and Mulder go do something. Or, what happens if Hank was a cop."

It is easier, he says, to remain focused on Aquarius and see it as "something that stands in its own world, on its own merit. I'm just focused on telling this particular story; it's a period show but the issues that we deal with historically in this show are actually issues that are very relevant today."

The feedback loop from his family is much easier to navigate. "My family doesn't talk to me about my work ever, as it should be," he says, smiling wryly.

Season two of Aquarius is now streaming on TVNZ on Demand.

- Stuff

Stuff.co.nz

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Re: Manson wasn't a revolutionary, he was an aberration

Post by jade1013 on Sun 10 Jul - 16:23


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