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David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 24 Apr - 8:58



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Sun 29 Apr - 10:55

5 new books you won't want to miss this week, including Paula McLain and David Duchovny

Jocelyn McClurg, USA TODAY Published 6:00 a.m. ET April 29, 2018

USA TODAY’s Jocelyn McClurg scopes out the hottest books on sale each week.

2. Miss Subways by David Duchovny (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, fiction, on sale May 1)

What it’s about: New York City’s subway system provides the setting for this modern updating of an ancient myth about star-crossed lovers; the latest novel from The X-Files star.

The buzz: “An entertaining, postmodern fairy tale,” says Kirkus Reviews.


USA TODAY

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Mon 30 Apr - 10:14

David Duchovny rides a winner with his third novel, 'Miss Subways'

Don Oldenburg, Special to USA TODAY Published 12:24 p.m. ET April 30, 2018


(Photo: Tim Palen)

At the beginning of Miss Subways, David Duchovny’s third novel (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 320 pp., ★★★˝ out of four), Emer Gunnels is a bright, talented second-grade teacher who commutes by subway every day from her Upper West Side apartment to her Greenwich Village private school.

In her late-30s, she’s attractive, hates men eyeballing her on the train, loves reading, and wishes she were a writer. She does yoga, is a lucid dreamer, and likes those leftover hallucinations from benign brain-tumor surgery.

While Emer loves her boyfriend, Con (short for Cuchulain Constance), she’s frustrated after a decade of supporting his Joseph Campbell-like research on pre-Christian deities residing in the New World. All of which means Emer’s a pretty normal New Yorker, right?

But this normal New York City love story torques quickly into a sensual, surreal comedy noir when Emer comes waist-to-face with a short, angry, Celtic fairy whose Bean Sidhe folkloric lineage foretells death.

Profanity-spewing, Bushmills-swigging “Sid” delivers a heartbreaking dilemma: Emer must choose to let Con live but separate from him forever, or he dies. She chooses to save Con and let their love die instead. That sets off a series of bizarre, myth-infused, hilarious events where every turn is the intersection of insanely supernatural and everyday ordinary.


"Miss Subways" by David Duchovny. (Photo: Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

The author of the well-received novels Holy Cow and Bucky (expletive) Dent, Duchovny is best known for his starring roles in The-X Files and Showtime’s Californication. In Miss Subways, the native New Yorker adeptly transforms the ancient Irish Cuchulain-and-Emer legend of star-crossed lovers into a postmodern fable, lovingly grounded in New York City, with Central Park walks, Lexington Avenue line rides, and Chinatown knick-knack shops.

Meanwhile, Miss Subways isn’t apocryphal. The contest regularly posted photos and brief bios of comely winners on trains from 1941 until 1976, and then sporadically. The transit tiara returned in 2017. Only qualifications: Be a New Yorker and ride the subways. And, so, riding her own New York magical mystery tour, Emer, deep down, feels she is a true Miss Subways. But is she?

Besides deities like Sid, who torments Emer, and the African goddess Anansi, who seduces Con, Duchovny introduces a cast of other memorable characters, including Emer’s best friend Izzy, a lesbian school psychologist, and Emer’s 81-year-old, Alzheimer’s-afflicted father, whose offhanded remarks undermine her life’s craziness.

If momentum lags in this vibrant tale, it’s the narrator’s occasional propensity for discourse, spurred by the “Train of Thought” quotes on subway signage, from Shakespeare, Kierkegaard, Yeats and others. Emer even admits these voices of her oracle on the train can give her "brain cramp."

Yet, Duchovny mostly keeps his loosey-goosey storytelling rolling with zany characters and playful wit worthy of Tom Robbins and recent Thomas Pynchon. He writes Emer so genuinely that readers will either fall for her, or identify with her, or both.

For lovers of myth, for lucid dreamers, and for passionate readers willing to suspend belief to embrace an enchanting tale of crazy love, this is a rollicking underground ride.


Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) and Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) reunite in 'The X-Files' on Fox. (Photo: Ed Araquel, Fox)


USA TODAY

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Mon 30 Apr - 20:50

Monday, April 30, 2018

Review: Miss Subways by David Duchovny




Miss Subways by David Duchovny | Rating: ★★★★★

As a note, a finished copy of this novel was sent to me via the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinions in any way.

David Duchovny is back with his new, and completely enthralling, novel Miss Subways. After two fantastic releases under his belt ("Holy Cow", "Bucky F*cking Dent") Duchovny has more than proven his chops as an author. I've said it once, and I'll say it again: David Duchovny knows how to tell a story. And Miss Subways is, perhaps, his best, and most ambitious, work to date.

Armed with a whimsical twist, and Duchovny's hypnotic prose, Miss Subways takes a spin on mythology and the ever-present theme of love and impossible choices. Based partly around The Only Jealousy of Emer by W.B. Yeats and this particular form of mythology, Miss Subways weaves itself into its own tale and then within the reader. It refuses to let go until you have reached the end of the road.

Intelligent, at times cheeky, and heartfelt, Miss Subways will undoubtedly be compared to Neil Gaiman's beloved novel American Gods.


While there is--of course--a similarity in structure, darkly laced humor and the use of mythology (and the nod to Gods or mythical creatures walking among us) between Miss Subways and American Gods, the parallels don't extend past the mundane. Both tell a deeply engrossing, thought-provoking story but ultimately that is where the similarities end.

What is most striking about Miss Subways is how genuine, and yet fantastical, the novel feels as it unfolds. Duchovny crafts a cast of compelling, full of life, characters with many flaws. Just the way we like 'em.

Some of these characters are ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances, others are anything but. He takes the familiar--the story is set in New York City, the dialogue and narration are sprinkled with pop culture references--and gives it a new edge. If you were to ask me to describe Miss Subways in one word (as opposed to my typical ramblings) I'd pick sharp.

My second choice would be electric.

Once again, Duchovny's characters take on a life of their own. Emer is the heroine readers will love to meet on paper; delightfully real and at a crossroad of impossibilities. Her relationship with Con, and the timelines they are destined to meet within, is equal parts heartbreaking and deliberately loving. Miss Subways tackles the complexities of life and then some; managing to somehow stay grounded in all its twists and turns of the supernatural.

Further, the side characters are just as wonderful to meet. (We all have an Izzy, right?) Readers will find themselves in a balance of humorous interactions casually placed in all of Miss Subways chaos. Because in the midst of all its tension, the book itself is damn funny.

At its core, Miss Subways is a witty glimpse into what one might call fate. The story is reinvented in ways that keep readers on their toes. And, of course, leave them aching for a satisfying conclusion they aren't certain will come.

Miss Subways is can't-miss-literature and will take you on a wildly imaginative ride. Duchovny is on fire! Once again, he has penned one of my favourite books of the year.



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by Duchovny on Tue 1 May - 0:51

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 7:08

'Miss Subways' is a quirky novel by David Duchovny

Updated 4:46 am, Tuesday, May 1, 2018


Photo: AP

This cover image released by Farrar, Straus and Giroux shows "Miss Subways," a novel by David Duchovny. (Farrar, Straus and Giroux via AP)

"Miss Subways" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), by David Duchovny

Though primarily known for his acting roles in TV series such as "The X-Files," David Duchovny has the writing gene as well. "Miss Subways" is a quirky, wholly original — and at times baffling — novel that tackles an Irish myth and gives it a contemporary spin, mixing it with legends and stories from other worlds.

What starts as a simple story of a woman in love turns into a battle with fate.

Emer commutes every day on the New York subway to her job, and she daydreams of a better life. Her boyfriend, Con, lives with her and is a struggling writer. One night after a lecture, she waits for him to come home while he hangs out with a mysterious woman named Anansi. In the middle of the night, she gets a knock at the door expecting Con. But it's a tiny doorman named Sid who tells her she must make a choice. Con is about to die, but she can save him by giving him up forever with no memory of them knowing each other. If she refuses, his life is over.

Her answer and the ramifications of her decision spin the story to an endearing conclusion.

Duchovny masters dialogue and various monsters and mythologies to weave this tale that's probably not for everyone. While rooting for Emer and Con to find happiness, readers will also question fate and reality.

"Miss Subways" reads like a hybrid of the TV show "Twin Peaks" and the 1998 film "Sliding Doors" merged with a love letter to New York City. A wild and unpredictable journey from Duchovny's bold imagination awaits readers.



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 8:58





Listen to an excerpt of David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS audiobook, read by the author, with Tea Leoni.

ew York Times best-selling author David Duchovny reimagines the Irish mythological figure of Emer in Miss Subways, a darkly comic fantasy love story set in New York City.

Emer is just a woman living in New York City who takes the subway, buys ice cream from the bodega on the corner, has writerly aspirations, and lives with her boyfriend, Con. But is this life she lives the only path she’s on?

Taking inspiration from the myth of Emer and Cuchulain and featuring an all-star cast of mythical figures from all over the world, David Duchovny’s darkly funny fantasy audiobook Miss Subways is one woman’s trippy, mystical journey down parallel tracks of time and love. On the way, Emer will battle natural and supernatural forces to find her true voice, power, and destiny.

A fairy tale of love lost and regained, Miss Subways is also a love letter to the city that enchants us all: New York.



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 10:45

As a novelist, David Duchovny is no Sean Penn

By Ron Charles May 1 at 12:09 PM   


David Duchovny channels the Irish myth of Emer and Cú Chulainn in his new novel, “Miss Subways.” The Post's Ron Charles investigates. (Ron Charles/The Washington Post)

Stranger than any episode of “The X-Files” is David Duchovny’s transformation into a novelist. This isn’t another sad case of those celebrities Who Just Do Stuff. Duchovny actually demonstrates some literary panache. Starting in 2015 with “Holy Cow” — narrated by an itinerant Holstein — he’s been publishing charming novels that glitter with silliness.


Author David Duchovny (Tim Palen)

His latest is an old-fashioned romantic comedy that takes its title from the Miss Subways posters that featured attractive working women on New York subway cars for several decades starting in 1941. But the story’s real inspiration reaches back many more centuries to the tale of Emer and Cu Chulainn in Irish mythology. Consequently, this may be the only novel ever to start with epigraphs by W.B. Yeats and Ed Koch. Take that incongruity as fair warning for the blarney that lies ahead.

Our heroine, Emer, is a talented first-grade teacher in modern-day New York City. Like this novel, her personality is marked by what Duchovny calls a “charismatic, universal, lighthearted melancholy.” At 41, she’s already spent several years encouraging her boyfriend, Con, a failed academic. (He supports himself by writing book reviews, which may be the most fantastical element of this fantasy plot.) Ignoring her own desire to write, Emer works as Con’s unpaid assistant on his research about the intermingling of religious and mythological beliefs brought to America over the years.

What little we see of Con’s slapdash thesis doesn’t inspire much confidence that he’ll ever find the success that Emer thinks he deserves. And what we see of Con himself makes it difficult to fathom Emer’s devotion. “If Twitter mated with Malcolm Gladwell. . . and moved a little to the right,” Con says, “that’s me.”

But that’s hardly the weirdest spawn in this tale.

One night while sitting alone in her apartment worrying about Con’s fidelity, Emer is visited by a little Irish doorman. Even if you don’t recognize the name Bean Sidhe as the Celtic fairies who foretell death, you’ll pick up on something odd about this profane visitor. (But don’t call him a leprechaun; he hates that.) Brushing aside Emer’s questions — and ours — Bean Sidhe explains that Con has offended the gods of Africa with “his right-wing-spin shenanigans,” and he’s about to be murdered by Anansi, the West African trickster god. Emer can save Con only if she vows never to see him again. “To prove your love for him,” Bean Sidhe says, “you have to let go of your love.”

Poof!

Before you can pick the petals off a shamrock, Emer wakes up in a revised version of her life — without Con. She’s just a middle-aged grade-school teacher muddling through with a vague sense that something’s missing. “All the images from last night receded and fled from any sort of specificity,” Duchovny writes, “replaced now by a deep, pervasive feeling of ambient loss, of being bereft. Bereft of what, she did not know.”


(Farrar Straus Giroux)

What follows is a Celtic version of “Groundhog Day,” as Emer meets a charming man name Con and learns once again that they cannot remain together. But Duchovny is in no hurry to cycle through that doomed romance. “Miss Subways” is definitely single-tracking, with lots of unloading along the way. If you can get yourself to sit back and stop focusing on the destination, there are plenty of oddly charming incidents to enjoy. Duchovny is particularly funny on the antics of schoolchildren and their uptight parents. He’s also got a great ear for the anxieties of dating, and the sweet comedy of middle-age sex.

When heady quotations from the likes of Carl Jung and Kierkegaard appear on the walls of the subway cars, it’s tempting to wonder if the spirit of Con’s pseudo-intellectualism hasn’t infected the novel a bit too deeply. But Duchovny isn’t just another pretty face. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton and a master’s degree in English from Yale, he handles these references with discernment and wit. And the novel is spiked with memorable little insights such as this superb description of Emily Dickinson: “She was able to perch in a twilight world between sense and nonsense, full of dread and hard truth, yet still retain an essence of the mundane, a whiff of her uneventful life, spent as a conscientious objector, hiding in plain sight in Massachusetts, to an establishment not yet ready to read her.”

As a certain slant of light hits these pages, you’ll also see mythical creatures like colors in a crow’s feathers. Sometimes, it’s a literary allusion to Persephone heading down to the subway; other times, Emer thinks she might have spotted Sobek with his crocodile head or Golems gathering in abandoned stations. In further iterations, Con seems so irresistible that he might be a gancanagh from Irish legend. And Emer’s grade-school principal seems to vacillate between two realms like Frank Morgan in “The Wizard of Oz.”

Literalists will find this exceedingly frustrating. As Bean Sidhe warns, “There’s no sense to be had here anymore. We’re past all sense of sense.” But more serious subjects rumble beneath the surface of “Miss Subways.” Emer’s childhood realization that she can never become a Catholic priest has long separated her from the church, leaving her with an aching “memory of that oneness with the holy.” Meanwhile, her father is adrift in dementia. And a couple of careless abortions has left her infertile and mourning. Such dark elements provide emotional ballast to what might otherwise have been a merely silly tale.

That darkness can’t permanently overshadow the story, though. This is, after all, a classic romantic comedy — not a grim Celtic myth. It’s a novel that wonders, “How steadfast is your belief in what is real?” — just the kind of question Agent Mulder might ask.

Ron Charles is the editor of Book World and host of TotallyHipVideoBookReview.com.

Miss Subways
By David Duchovny
Farrar Straus Giroux. 320 pp. $26


Washington Post

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 12:08


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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 12:54


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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 1 May - 15:20








macmillan.audio

When it came time to record his new novel, MISS SUBWAYS, @DavidDuchovny kept it in the family. The audiobook is read by David and Téa Leoni, and includes a guest appearance from their daughter, West!
   .
   .
   .
   #audiobooks #audiobook #loveaudiobooks #loveaudio #newrelease #celebritynarrator #inthestudio #davidduchovny #tealeoni #behindthescenes #bookstagram #audiobookstagram #recordingbooth #recordingstudio #macmillanaudio #teamworkmakesthedreamwork #xfiles #madamesecretary #téaleoni

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Wed 2 May - 4:56



Miss Subways
by David Duchovny
Pub Date: 01 May 2018

Review by Sandhya R, Reviewer
Last updated on 02 May 2018

I Recommend This Book 4/5 Yes

I received an advanced reading copy of David Duchovny's 'Miss Subways', thanks to publishers Farrar, Straus and Giroux and NetGalley.

The book does not fall into the category of my preferred genre. However, owing to my love for X-Files and curiosity on what Mulder/Duchovny can produce, I picked it up. Unlike the cliche associated with celebrities wielding the pen, Duchovny's writing is actually good.

The story is quirky in style and substance and makes an interesting read. What is unique about Duchovny's style is the humour he employs. He spares nothing and smartly paints a satire of society, its beliefs, practices, self-importance and whatnot! I was also quite impressed with the vast pop and ancient culture knowledge that Duchovny possesses and weaves in this fantasy tale with ease.

Miss. Subways is the tale of Emer, a schoolteacher whose seemingly mundane life takes a twist when she encounters a mythical creature, Bean Sidhe. What follows is a tale that is part sci-fi, part fantasy with a generous helping of romance and its share of happily-ever-after concepts. While this sounds like a crazy combination and it is, Duchovny makes the ride memorable and filled with surprises. Most of the times, I had to remind myself that it was a male author portraying a female protagonist. Duchovny is that convincing while voicing Emer!

While I found the beginning a bit patchy in narration, I persevered and did not regret giving it a chance. The meaty middle is where all the goodness of the book lies. The resolution towards the end was a bit of a let down for me since I felt Duchovny became a bit restless and quickly tied up all loose threads. The irreverence and boldness he portrays through the rest of the book somehow feel absent here and it seems as if he succumbed to some sort of audience-pleasing pressure.

Overall, it's quite an interesting read. Turns out, Fox Mulder has more up his sleeve than I'd imagined!



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by Duchovny on Thu 3 May - 1:05

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Thu 3 May - 5:08

Two New Works of Fiction About Mass Transit and a Daring Female Pilot



By Sam Roberts
May 2, 2018

“Even now, I can sit in the subway, and look up at the ads, and close my eyes, and there’s Miss Subways.” Mayor Edward I. Koch once recalled. “She wasn’t the most beautiful girl in the world but she was ours. She was our own Miss America.”

Most New Yorkers probably don’t remember those eye-catching girl-next-door photographs. They were conceived by J. Walter Thompson to make the adjacent placards leased by Walter O’Malley’s advertising agency for soap, beer, cigarettes, soda, liquor and laxative companies more inviting.

David Duchovny, the New York-born actor, was just a teenager when the last of the Miss Subways was crowned. He is best known for his television roles as Fox Mulder, the F.B.I. agent in “The X-Files,” and Hank Moody, the novelist in “Californication.” But in his third novel, “Miss Subways” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), he demonstrates unequivocally that, to paraphrase the actor Chris Robinson who portrayed Dr. Rick Webber on “General Hospital,” he not only plays a novelist on TV, but is one.

Literary snobs can rest assured that Mr. Duchovny’s academic credentials are impeccable. He earned a bachelor’s from Princeton and a master’s from Yale, both in English literature, and started a doctoral thesis on a subject that Hollywood agents must be salivating over, “Magic and Technology in Contemporary Fiction and Poetry.”


Mr. Duchovny, the author of “Miss Subways.”CreditClement Pascal for The New York Times

Mr. Duchovny (whose mother was Scottish and a teacher; his father, the Brooklyn-born son of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who, as a writer, published his first novel at 73) peppers his book with classic literary quotations from “Train of Thought,” that (mass) transcendent and officially-sanctioned infusion of high culture (like today’s “Poetry in Motion”) written on subway walls where the Miss Subways placards were once posted.

“Miss Subways” was inspired by Yeats’s century-old verse play, “The Only Jealousy of Emer” (itself drawn from Irish mythology). Even readers who aren’t fans of the metaphysical will be captivated by the author’s charming narrative and vivid exposition as he recounts the fantasy romance between a struggling writer named Con Powers and Emer Gunnels, a parochial school teacher, who emerges as the novelist incarnate.

Mr. Duchovny recounts a hilarious (and all too realistic) lesson that the teacher’s principal delivers on political correctness. He writes that no sane rider would pull the emergency brake on the subway barring an apocalyptic act (“a damn velociraptor on the loose would be the bare minimum reason”). And he wonders why Emer “marveled at how many activities city dwellers seemed to prize were ones that made you forget you were in New York.”

Mr. Duchovny proves himself as a novelist when Con, Emer’s lover, asks, “‘Do you see this story, this love story, spinning out into infinite variations? Or, are you saying that this one, the one that ends with the man making the ultimate romantic sacrifice for the woman in the eternal struggle between perfection of the life or the work — that that’s the best of all possible worlds?’”

“ ‘I’m a writer,’” she replies. ‘I don’t “say” anything. I write around it.’”

Another New York novel, “Flying Jenny” (Akashic Books) by Theasa Tuohy, is a fictionalized account drawn from an obituary that appeared in The New York Times in 2010. As seen through the eyes of Laura Bailey, a tabloid newspaper reporter, Jenny Flynn, a stunt pilot (inspired by the exploits of Elinor Smith), begins the book by swooping under the East River bridges on an audacious flight west.


The New York Times

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by Duchovny on Thu 3 May - 11:25

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Fri 4 May - 5:44

Review: Miss Subways by David Duchovny

Jasmine Shaheen
May 3, 2018



“Emer was troubled at how all interpretation now devolved into matters of race or gender or religion. There was no art anymore… Why wasn’t the crow female? Why was the Creator a ‘He’? Wasn’t Bald Eagle insensitive to men with hair loss? This is how we spend our time now. Yes, these were legitimate questions and deep, worthwhile historical concerns, but she was reminded of Wordsworth and how we “murder to dissect.” Everyone bending over backwards to not cross any lines, like a huge game of gender-race-neutral mental Twister.”

Disclaimer: This is one of the most peculiar and eccentric books you’ll ever encounter; it’ll flip your mind, you have been warned. Read at your own risk!

Miss Subways is inspired by the Irish mythology of Cuchulain, a warrior who has the love of all women, but none of them is good enough for him, intellectually. Until, Emer. She challenges him that he has to earn her love and prove it. In Miss Subways, however, it doesn’t seem like that when you first start reading the book. Most of the time, I found myself asking “Why the hell does Emer want to save Con? Why does she want him back?” Her character is so much more intricate, her brains deserve a match of her own, and I honestly couldn’t find that in Con at all. Con was more of an ass than anything when he was first introduced, and yet, they clicked! Perhaps, one of the things that Duchovny was trying to convey is that love doesn’t make sense, it just happens! I’m quite certain of that because that literally happened.

Seriously though, Miss Subways is not what I had expected at all when I first read the synopsis. It’s New York City with all its leprechauns, demons, fairies and a great sense of nonsense that makes sense. But when I read the synopsis, it reminded me of that movie Sliding Doors and I thought it was going to be a light read on a woman who is living two realities and trying to save the man she loves in a mythical New York setting, you know, the usual!



While this remains true, it’s not exactly the story, because the story is so much more than that. This is a character-driven story, and the main character Emer—in my opinion—is the story herself; it was almost like an autopsy of a mind. Throughout the story, I was intrigued by Emer’s thoughts, analysis, and behavior. It was both equally natural and complex. The more you read Emer’s mind, the more you understand the meaning of being human. You don’t get a straight answer; you get an amalgamation of ideas, conflicts, emotions, and doubts that your mind starts twirling because you can’t grasp a thread of sense; of one true thing. Miss Subways is thought-provoking, intellectual and a challenging read. It makes you question reality; why we do things in certain ways and why do things happen in a certain way?!

One of the things that I really admired about the book is how bold and brave the writing is, it just proves that the book can not only be read as a modern fantasy but as a reflecting mirror of the world today. The author is honest and straightforward about giving his opinion on all things that matter; religion, politics, and social behaviors. Whether or not you agree with them, it is refreshing to put the walls down and stop censoring yourself. Miss Subways is quite a read you don’t want to miss, and it hits bookshelves on May 1st 2018.

You can purchase this book from Book Depository, Amazon, and other book retailers.

This title was provided for review by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and this review can also be found at The Reading Bee’s Bookshelf.


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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Sat 5 May - 6:50



Miss Subways Book Review

May 5, 2018

Actor, director, musical artist and writer are the many titles of Miss Subways’ author David Duchovny, mostly known for his role as Fox Mulder on FOX’s The X Files. For his third novel, following his previous literary adventures of Holy Cow and Bucky F*cking Dent (both brilliant novels), Duchovny uses his witty dialogue and character-driven storytelling and delves into the mystery of Irish legends.

Miss Subways follows schoolteacher Emer, a New York City woman who frequents the subway and her journey of the mystical and mythical ideas of fate and love. Emer and her boyfriend, Con, are based on the Irish myths of Emer and Cuchulain, two lovers essentially made for each other.

In this New York love story, the forgotten deities and mythical creatures of past immigrants rise as forces fighting against Emer’s quest for true love with Con. What starts out like any other romance story suddenly fills with mystery as Emer wakes to the knock on the door to find a very short Irish doorman, Sid. He tells her Con is about to die and she will have to decide between saving Con’s life and living her life without ever having known Con, or to love him and let him die. She wakes the next morning feeling a great sense of identifiable loss.

In her new life, post-Con, she finds herself on the path of true love again along with the fantastical and mythical twists and turns that love entails. 



Miss Subways is no straightforward story and I found myself saying “what the fuck?” and wondering what would come next as Emer’s past and present soon tied together and it was hard to sense what was true and what wasn’t. Was it all a dream, a myth or was it real life?

Having read Duchovny’s previous two novels I knew his third would be just as good. The strengths of the three books lie with the dialogue which is ever so witty and the unique, but average, main characters, well mostly unique when it comes to the talking cow who wants to go to India instead of being slaughtered on a farm in the US in Holy Cow…

Many Hollywood stars make their attempts in other art forms but not many manage to find their voice like Duchovny. There’s a true feeling of love for literature as he quotes and name drops various literary geniuses throughout the centuries.

I chose to listen to the audiobook as I was not patient enough to wait for the book. It was fantastically narrated by Duchovny himself and the voice of Emer was performed by actress Téa Leoni in such a way that her voice moulded with the written voice of Emer. I don’t often listen to audiobooks but listening to it gave it a feeling I don’t think I would have got from reading it myself.

Miss Subways is definitely a book I will return to in the future and that I would love to see turned into a film. It perfectly intertwines present-day New York with old forgotten gods and myths all wrapped up in a love story.



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 8 May - 12:18



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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Wed 9 May - 8:58

10 books Amazon's editors say are the best reads this May

Ellen Hoffman, Insider Picks
27m

The Insider Picks team writes about stuff we think you'll like. Business Insider has affiliate partnerships, so we get a share of the revenue from your purchase.


Amazon Kindle

Most of us could stand to devote more time to reading. We make room in our busy schedules to watch the latest seasons of our favorite TV shows, but we don't put enough time aside for books.

If you're looking for something to keep you occupied before bed or on your commute to work this May, we suggest checking out Amazon's Best Books of the Month, a section of the site wholly dedicated to new releases in literature and fiction, nonfiction, history, and more.

You'll find a spotlight pick (this month's is "Warlight" by Michael Ondaatje) along with nine other books that Amazon's book editors loved this month.

For anyone looking for a good book to read on their couch or the subway, this list is a good place to start your search.

Captions have been provided by Erin Kodicek, editor of books and Kindle at Amazon.com.

"Miss Subways" by David Duchovny



Amazon  

In Irish lore, Emer was the daughter of a nobleman, and the only woman Celtic god Cúchulainn deemed worthy to marry him. David Duchovny (yes,that guy from "The X Files") has penned a dark fantasy that plops Emer down into New York City. Supernatural hijinks ensue.

Buy it here >>



Business Insider

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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Wed 9 May - 9:04

April Showers Bring…May Audiobooks?

Katie MacBride
05-08-18

A version of this post previously appeared in the audiobooks newsletter. Sign-up for any of the Book Riot newsletters here.

May is here and the audiobook gods have lots of exciting new releases in store. As always, publisher’s description in quotes.



Miss Subways by David Duchovny; narrated by David Duchovny, Téa Leoni; Release date: 05-01-18

“Taking inspiration from the myth of Emer and Cuchulain and featuring an all-star cast of mythical figures from all over the world, David Duchovny’s darkly funny fantasy audiobook Miss Subways is one woman’s trippy, mystical journey down parallel tracks of time and love. On the way, Emer will battle natural and supernatural forces to find her true voice, power, and destiny.  

While recording this audiobook, Duchovny had the idea of bringing his ex-wife, Téa Leoni in to voice the female characters in the book. I love Téa Leoni and what I love most about Téa Leoni is her voice. I know this is a weird thing to say, but I feel like if any people can understand what I’m talking about, it’s my audiobook pals. After watching the first season of Madam Secretary, in which Leoni is the titular character, I “watched” it again, letting it play in the background while I worked from home, just because I like her voice so much. Weird, right? But maybe you also understand? Anyway, having her as a narrator is a huge selling point for me. Also, Leoni and Duchovney got their two kids, West and Miller, to read the chapter openings and other sections. Pretty cute, right?


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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Fri 11 May - 17:00

Zachary Houle
Book critic, Fiction author, Poet, Writer, Editor. Follow me on Twitter @zachary_houle.
May 11


David Duchovny

A Review of David Duchovny’s “Miss Subways”

The Character Files


“Miss Subways” Book Cover

I once read a review of a Julian Lennon album where the reviewer flat out asserted that in no point during the review would who Julian’s famous father was would ever come up. I hope to do the same with this review of David Duchovny’s new novel (his third), though Duchovny doesn’t have a famous father, per se. He is known far better for acting in a particular conspiracy theory television show of the ’90s than he is as a novelist, of course. However, it should be said that Duchovny has some talent as a writer — he’s not merely someone who is parlaying his fame into another area of expertise. To that end, said novel, Miss Subways, shows some remarkable promise, though it does have its share of flaws.

The plot entails a woman named Emer who has a funny, altogether boyfriend named Con. Otherwise, Emer is your typical New Yorker who rides the subways, teaches kids (she plays a ukulele and has come up with a song about vowels to educated them in language), respects her father (who calls her Bill) and devours ice cream like anyone else. However, Con is being courted by Hollywood with his writing and earns the affections of a woman who is really a spider goddess. (Did I mention that the book is pegged as fantasy? No?) The only way to save his life, according to a dwarf who doubles as a doorman to Emer’s apartment building, is to make a deal with the Celtic gods who will spare him if Con never sees or thinks about him ever again. However, in Emer’s new life, she runs into Con on the subway, and things progress from there.

While much of the plot is coincidence, Miss Subways is really a novel about character. It practically marinades in it. Emer goes about her business in the book, teaching kids, making a crow her pet, running afoul of the headmaster, visiting her aging father, and playing Led Zeppelin on her beloved uke. It’s to Duchovny’s credit that he has created a winning character in Emer — who is maybe a tad too hysterically feminine, but otherwise is the sort of person you’ll want to hang out with for some 300 pages. Con, though a lesser character who disappears for sections of the book, is also likable. Buoyed by the rather silly premise, it’s simply these two lives and their everydayness that propels things forward. It’s the characters you’ll invest in, not necessarily the plot or story.

And that’s kind of the problem with Miss Subways. Just based on premise alone, the book doesn’t make very much sense. We don’t ever really know why the gods who populate this story — which, one has to wonder, came about with some brainstorming over spliffs with Chris Carter — take such an intense attraction to two seemingly ordinary people. It’s never really explained why Emer and Con are destined to be apart, though it is hinted that Emer takes the relationship for granted and the scheming behind their separation has something to do with that. But this aspect of the plot pretty much kicks in right away, so we never really see Emer and Con as a couple before love (or something else) tears them apart, to borrow a song title.

Granted, to be fair, we do see Emer and Con’s courtship as a couple as they get reacquainted with each other. Still, we never see how that has sustained itself into something more long term. There are hints and Polaroids that show they’ll grow into old age together, but the glue that would keep them together that long is never uncorked out of the bottle. To that end, I suppose that Miss Subways has some structural problems.

That all said, I rather enjoyed the book in a perverse way because it’s well written and the sense of ordinariness seemed novel. Emer merely spends the bulk of the book living her life, as though she were a character in a literary novel, not some piece of pulp. Duchovny is a cataloguer of plainness, and seems to revile in it, merely using the fantastic as a backdrop. Maybe he learned a thing or two from that famous TV show that he was in? If yes, Duchovny is kind of like Stephen King in this novel. I’ve always found King to be less about the supernatural, and more about the day-to-day lives of everyday people who find themselves stuck in extraordinary situations. The thing is, here, Emer is supposed to have forgotten about her past life. That’s a part of the deal she strikes. However, she keeps on keeping on, even though her living circumstances change after she brokers the deal to save Con’s life.

I don’t really peek at other people’s reviews when I write my own, but, in stealing a cover pic from Goodreads, have seen that Duchovny is borrowing from other sources in telling this tale, making it a layer on top of other writer’s works that have come before. I suppose that many writers use this trick, but, in Duchovny’s hands, he has crafted what feels like a wholly original story. True, the book kind of meanders and then peters out entirely at the climax, as though he was unsure how to end this tale of the fantastic that is also service-like in its smallness. Still, I have to say that the book is not bad, especially considering his more famous day job. (How’s that going by the way? I don’t watch movies or TV anymore, so I have kind of fallen out of the loop.) Duchovny is no dilettante. He still has some ways to go and room to improve, but Miss Subways is an agreeable enough read and leaves one wondering what other caverns of the soul Duchovny has yet to uncover. You can’t really ask for much more than that.

David Duchovny’s Miss Subways was published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux on May 1, 2018.

Of course, if you like what you see, please recommend this piece (click on the clapping hands icon below) and share it with your followers.


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Re: David Duchovny's MISS SUBWAYS

Post by jade1013 on Tue 15 May - 7:18

New & Noteworthy

May 15, 2018

New this week:

MISS SUBWAYS By David Duchovny. Read by the author and Tea Leoni, with West Duchovny. (Macmillan Audio.) To record the audiobook version of his new novel, Duchovny enlisted the help of his wife and daughter, adding much warmth to the story of a woman whose quest for something more plays out against the backdrop of a technicolor New York City.


New York Times

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