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11x01 - My Struggle III

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Fri 18 Aug - 10:34


fortheloveofxfiles:

I’ve been at 8th & pine for a while now and nothing super interesting. Zero signs of GA or DD right now, though word is that Gillian was here earlier. Looks like her stunt double is here looking unharmed! (… so far. With a better, fuller wig in my opinion.) There are several cars that are part of the crash scene. They keep saying it’s about to happen.
A few ppl waiting around in anticipation. Several gave up.

BAM!
Ok, black SUV t-boned a blue sedan. Several other cars around but not actually part of the crash (including a white or silver SUV that came close). I was too far back to see, but I suspect GA stunt double was in one on the SUVs. She was wearing knee/shin pads.
They made us watch from ¾ of the way down the street most of the time and kept moving us around. Unfortunately, this is the best photo I could get of anything.
Now I’m headed downtown to see what I can see on thurlow!

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Sat 19 Aug - 6:21






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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Sat 19 Aug - 9:33




X-Files Season 11 Spoiler - Dana Scully Car Crash
Celebrity WotNot

Publicado em 18 de ago de 2017

☼ http://www.celebritywotnot.com ☼

X-Files Season 11 Spoiler - Dana Scully Car Crash

The X-Files was back filming in Vancouver, Canada with scenes involving a car crash with Gillian Anderson who was back playing Dana Scully! Gillian Anderson returned to Vancouver to film the new season 11 of X-Files this week. Dana Scully was seen getting into a car crash before being helped out of the car with blood on her face. Gillian was seen chatting with director Chris Carter in-between takes, who also appeared to enjoying a sandwich.

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Sat 19 Aug - 9:34


alfwit44

🎶Fraturday, Fraturday, Fraturday night all night... woo hoo hoo hoo.... in the studio alright🎶🎶
#fraturday #setlife #filmlife #behindthescenes #lighteverywhere #gaffer #ia891 #ia669 #hollywoodnorth #yvrshoots #yvrfilm #trustnoone #welight #weroll

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Sun 20 Aug - 12:20




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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by dreamy on Thu 24 Aug - 8:43

I like the way they hide the process from paparazzi  =)

jade1013 wrote:
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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 28 Sep - 12:33



perplexistan:
From “Checking In on The X-Files,” in this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly.

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Wed 13 Dec - 18:34

The X-Files - Episode 11.01 - My Struggle III - Press Release

Posted by SpoilerTV at December 13, 2017



THE TRUTH IS CLOSER THAN EVER ON THE ALL-NEW SEASON PREMIERE OF "THE X-FILES" WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3, ON FOX

Episode Written and Directed by Series Creator Chris Carter

Picking up after the last event series' cliffhanger, Mulder and Scully learn that they aren't the only ones desperately searching for their long-lost son, William. The very fate of the world may depend on it in the all-new "My Struggle III" season premiere episode of THE X-FILES airing Wednesday, Jan. 3 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (XF-1101) (TV-14 D, L, V)

Cast: David Duchovny as Fox Mulder; Gillian Anderson as Dana Scully; Mitch Pileggi as Walter Skinner

Guest Cast: William B. David as Cigarette Smoking Man; Annabeth Gish as Monica Reyes; Chris Owen as Jeffrey Spender; AC Peterson as Mr. Y; Barbara Hershey as Erika Price; Robbie Amell as Agent Miller; Lauren Ambrose as Agent Einstein; Anjali Jay As Dr. Joyet

Source: FOX


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Tue 19 Dec - 13:46

"My Struggle III" Promo Photos Revealed

By Roi Ollson
On December 19, 2017


FOX has released a sneak peek of what's to come from The X-Files' season opener "My Struggle III". These promo photos give us an idea of where we find Mulder and Scully after last season's cliffhanger. Be warned though, the photos contain some spoilers as to what's happening in the episode. Check out all 20 images after the jump.



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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 28 Dec - 17:40




dunhamhairograpy:
Opening scene, My Struggle III.

You’re welcome Wink

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by Duchovny on Wed 3 Jan - 6:10

thanks
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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 3:45

The X-Files Season 11 Episode 1 Review: My Struggle III

Did The X-Files satisfy the big cliffhanger? Find out in our review...



Chris Longo
Jan 3, 2018

This review of The X-Files contains heavy spoilers. Readers be warned!

The X-Files Season 11 Episode 1


It was all a dream! Well, it’s more complicated than that. Actually, it’s all rather confusing and I had to watch The X-Files Season 11 premiere, “My Struggle III,” 2.5 times to feel confident that I had the plot straight and how it relates back to the long, winding history of the show’s myth arc. I’m still undecided if the premiere clears up the outstanding issues created by season 10, or even makes some of them worse, but a few overarching elements of series creator Chris Carter’s narrative (the complete four-part arc titled My Struggle) did set up some semblance of a compelling intro to the season.

On my initial viewing, much of that goodwill was squandered by long exposition dumps, with David Duchovny doing voiceover in a car for seemingly half the episode, and a sense of urgency that bordered on parody. What the episode does do well is introduce a path forward with potential. More importantly, it continues a somewhat unexpected dialogue on the current state of public affairs. To Chris Carter’s credit, much of the groundwork to make the show feel “relevant,” as we’ve seen a number of critics including myself say in the spoiler-free reviews, came from the panned aspects of “My Struggle I” (Does that make most of “My Struggle II” unnecessary? Maybe!).

Picking up from the cliffhanger, we open on Dana Scully in Mulder’s office (I can only presume at this point that somewhere in season 11 they’ll finally get this poor woman a desk). She sees flashes of the UFOs, Mulder dying of the Spartan virus, etc., and passes out, only to wake up in a hospital and recount the visions she saw to Mulder, who has no idea what the hell she’s talking about.

This is far from the first time we’ve seen a white flash of light erase or reset some big scene in this show. Fans might get a little testy, and possibly even be triggered by the lack of explanation and execution. I was at first! But there’s plenty of precedent in the history of The X-Files for us to move on and accept Scully’s vision as the premonitions they prove to be in the rest of the episode. As our X-Files correspondent Matt Allair pointed out, this could be a callback mirroring Mulder’s comatose visions of the hellish end times in season six’s “The Sixth Extinction II: Amor Fati.”

I don’t like crediting Tad O’Malley with anything, but he was an avatar for the disinformation campaigns we’ve seen in the two years since the episode aired. Sure, it looks like Tad was right about the Spartan virus, but he served to focus Mulder on fighting even harder to make the truth surface today amongst all the loud, brash bullshit online or within our government. One guy who knows that better than anyone is Carl Gerhart Bush, or C.G.B. Spender, or the Cigarette Smoking Man. Back in all his glory and holding the world in his hands, some of the best scenes of the episode are William B. Davis engaged in the machinations of the end times, and the flashbacks that establish him as essentially the most powerful man in the world.

Putting aside the direct missle hit we’ll have to assume he survived thanks to alien technology or medicine, CSM can sit on his perch and watch the world destroy itself. Fake news, natural disasters, and a lack of trust in science distract us, while our impending doom creeps closer. It’s the ultimate cover for a man who spent the decades operating in the shadows. “I’m not a bad man, I’m a practical man,” CSM says, which we’ve heard before. Can we believe it at this point? By offering immunity to the virus, is he offering one final peace treaty to the group of people he’s tormented and toyed with for years? Or is it something more sinister, like when he told Mulder in the original series finale, “The Truth,” that he protected him for years only to wait for the day he finally got to break the agent’s spirit.

Further complicating the storyline is the men sent to harass former agent Jeffrey Spender, who through the powers of modern medicine is no longer horribly deformed, and tail Agent Mulder in the world’s most boring and inconsequential car chase. Spender is being pressured to give up the location of Mulder and Scully’s son William, who is apparently the key to stopping CSM’s plan. There’s another, new group looking for Mulder. The group needs to stop CSM, but their motives are mysterious and unclear.

In the best scene of the episode, the group says the aliens aren’t coming. Extraterrestrials have “no interest in a warming planet with vanishing resources.” If true, maybe that answers for the Mayans fucking up their calendar and the lack of an alien colonization in 2012. Somehow, CSM is in possession of an alien pathogen that will be “the end of history.” The group says they want to save humanity, and that CSM was a rogue operator and left their group long ago, presumably to help form The Syndicate. It’s no surprise that in a matter of moments, CSM is framing himself as a hero, a man who tried to bargain with the alien colonists and protect our society. So does this mean there were two factions attempting to save humanity at all costs? Or one trying to stop the other? Can the story of either party be verified? Are both groups lying to Mulder?

In the biggest reveal of the episode, one that will absolutely destroy shippers, is CSM claiming that William is not Mulder’s son, and he impregnated Scully during their getaway in season 7’s “En Ami,” which is cool because the first draft of the script was originally written by William B. Davis. But again, IS THAT A LIE, X-FILES? Who knows?!

Somewhere in this episode the truth has been laid out. It’s up to Mulder and Scully to wade through the lies at a time when it’s easier than ever to dismiss and obstruct the truth. I do like that setup, if even it’s handled a little cleaner in the subsequent episodes.

My issue here is the pacing. Some of the great X-Files directors like Rob Bowman and the late Kim Manners knew when to press on the gas and when to slow down and let the dialogue breathe. In the “My Struggle” episodes, the show seems to have adopted the breathless walk and talk dialogue of The West Wing. And for a show that used all kinds of music as well as any drama to amplify its intense, emotional, and scary scenes, the undercurrent of upbeat and generic action drama melody in the episode is another unneeded distraction. These are nitpicky, maybe minor points, but it adds up for longtime fans, and might take some people out of what could be a really fun arc.

As I wrote in my spoiler-free review of the first five episodes of season 11, this season is structured a little different than the 10 that come before it. Elements of “My Struggle III” bleed into the next handful of episodes, a slight departure from the show’s church and state separation of the myth arc and monster-of-the-week episodes. “My Struggle III” leaves a lot of questions, many that will not be answered truthfully. We know by now that truth and proof are as hard to come by as little green men.

“My Struggle I” and “My Struggle III” were not great episodes by any stretch, but they at least reaffirm why we need to commit to finding the the truth. Remember Mulder’s final courtroom statement in the original series finale?

“Liars do not fear the truth if there are enough liars,” Mulder says.

2.5/5


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:02

The X-Files premiere recap: 'My Struggle III'


Robert Falconer/FOX

Kelly Connolly January 03, 2018 AT 09:00 PM EST

The X-Files

type
   TV Show
genre
   Drama, Mystery, Sci-fi
performer
   Gillian Anderson, David Duchovny
author
   Chris Carter
broadcaster
   Fox
seasons
   11
Current Status
   In Season
tvpgr
   TV-14

We gave it a
C

In the age of the X-Files revival, you can tell a mythology episode by the “struggle.” Part 1 belonged to Mulder. Part 2 was Scully’s. Part 3, kicking off what’s officially known as “the second chapter of The X-Files event series” (forgive me if I shorten it to season 11), is technically the Cigarette Smoking Man’s struggle. It might also be ours.

I can’t start this recap anywhere other than CSM’s vile, episode-ending suggestion that he, not Mulder, is the true biological father of Scully’s child. I suspect his claim won’t turn out to be true, but that’s not the point. CSM’s story has always been marked by subjectivity, every suspicious detail told through his eyes. See for example season 4’s “Musings of a Cigarette Smoking Man,” in which he spun his own backstory, villainously Forrest Gump-ing his way into the most infamous historical events of the late 20th century. We never even knew more of his name than he wanted us to. (Now he says it’s Carl. Carl!) The ambiguity surrounding the Smoking Man has turned into an example of the show’s inability to conclusively resolve anything about its mythology, but in the early seasons, this is what made him such an effective villain: He wasn’t bound by facts because the truth was his to shape. Since its pilot, The X-Files has been critical of those shadowy government figures who withhold information in order to maintain their grasp on the power they feel slipping away. It’s still a relevant theme.

But so too is sexual abuse and consent, and this show has a shaky history there. Scully was violated without her consent when her eggs were harvested during her abduction; Mulder found out what had been taken from her before she did. That experience kicked off a series-long story that was less interested in Scully’s emotional trauma than it was in “will-they-won’t-they”-ing her uterus: She couldn’t have kids! She might be able to have kids! IVF didn’t work! She had a baby anyway! But was the baby Mulder’s?

Even when not centered on Scully, stories about rape on this show have a hard time using the word “rape.” (Season 5’s black-and-white classic “The Post-Modern Prometheus” skirted around dealing with the monster as a rapist because the women he “impregnated” all wanted kids.) Now, in 2018, the Smoking Man tells Skinner it was “science — alien science” that made him the father of Scully’s baby. Euphemisms aside, the outcome is the same. The X-Files just went back in time nearly 18 years to add in the rape of its main character by its villain and to question yet again whether Mulder is William’s father. It’s baffling. It’s irresponsible. And even if not everything CSM claims turns out to be true, dangling a terrible possibility over our heads only to eventually disprove it doesn’t usually make for satisfying drama.

Actually, this premiere already does that. Last season’s cliffhanger — an alien virus swept the planet; Scully, immune thanks to the alien DNA she was given during her abduction, whipped up a vaccine, but it wasn’t enough to save a ragged-looking Mulder; only stem cells from William could do that, but since she gave him up for adoption, he could be anywhere — has all been erased, which would be more frustrating if that episode were any good. Mulder finds Scully unresponsive on the office floor after a seizure, which either caused or was caused by the apocalyptic visions we (and she) experienced as reality in “My Struggle II.” Her neurologist, Dr. Joyet, tells Mulder, “Neurologically speaking, her brain’s on fire.” Sure, that checks out medically.

It gets X-Filesier! A scan reveals that part of Scully’s brain is lighting up in, get this, Morse code; Skinner translates it as “FIND HIM.” He assumes the “him” is William, but Mulder would rather sit by Scully’s bedside than run off chasing phantom leads. This is one of my favorite Mulder-and-Scully M.O.s: They swap places when one of them is in danger. Scully was ready to fight anyone who said Mulder’s season 8 abduction wasn’t aliens, while Mulder is never less willing to entertain a fantastic theory than when he thinks it might come at Scully’s expense. She’s disoriented when she wakes up, explaining what she saw like it’s still happening (“You’re dying, Mulder. And I can’t save you”), and Mulder listens. But he insists on talking to Scully’s doctor before he goes in search of CSM (the actual “him” who needs finding), leaving Scully looking heartbroken that he doesn’t believe her. (Next: The aliens aren’t coming)

Unfortunately for Mulder, Dr. Joyet has obviously seen some things. She’s treated a few patients who were the products of governmental “experiments on the mind” and is remarkably chill about whatever superpowers resulted. Scully — who has records of what she was subjected to during her abduction, and whose visions relied on her alien DNA — insists that she’s never been a part of any experiments. Mulder reluctantly leaves to do some investigating; he’s not so much curious as he is just trying to keep Scully from checking herself out of the hospital and tracking down William on her own. You tried, Mulder.

Someone tails Mulder from the hospital; after luring the goon into an intersection at a red light, he turns the tables and tails his tail all the way to South Carolina — where Scully said CSM is alive and well. (It was sobering to remember that at the top of this episode, Mulder still believed he lived in a world where getting shot in the face with a rocket launcher means you die.) By the time the goon pulls up to a very nice mansion, Mulder is fully convinced that his cigarette-smoking father is not only among the living but right inside this house.

Instead, he finds another gravel-voiced man with a smoking habit, credited as Mr. Y (A.C. Peterson), and a woman named Erika Price (Barbara Hershey). (Recall that Mulder’s second informant was known as Mr. X. The alphabet is running out.) Y claims to be a surviving member of the Syndicate, the cabal of conspirators who were mostly wiped out in season 6. He and Price want Mulder to kill the Cigarette Smoking Man in order to save humanity from extermination. They don’t explain why they or their broad-shouldered goon can’t be the ones to pull the trigger.

It’s just like an X-Files villain to refuse to take responsibility. The Smoking Man opens this episode with a monologue that shrugs off the weight of his decisions by blaming forces outside his control: “Too much is made of the will to power, as if our will is free.” He isn’t bad, he says; he’s just practical, taking advantage of mankind’s tendency toward self-destruction. It’s a sentiment Price and Mr. Y echo: The aliens came to study us once, but they’re not coming back. We made too big a mess of this planet.

Their story fits unevenly into old versions of The X-Files’ mythology, playing as a sort of hybrid of last season’s “the aliens came to help us because they’re NICE” theory and season 6’s suggestion that the conspirators made a deal with alien invaders, sacrificing members of their families (Mulder’s sister included) in order to save themselves when the colonization began. It works better thematically, exposing how cowardice masquerades as cynicism. Too many people with the power to help humanity would rather claim we’re beyond saving, wash their hands, and start over, especially if they can make a dime in the process. Price and Y don’t plan to fix the world after taking out CSM; their “budding enterprise” is space colonization by a chosen elite. Mulder can come along if he does their bidding.

In D.C., another deal is being offered by another man who thinks he’s above it all. The Smoking Man, with Monica at his side, corners Skinner in his car and explains what Scully saw in her visions: He’s got an alien pathogen capable of wiping out the population. He offers Skinner immunity if he’ll deliver William, whom CSM plans to dangle in front of Scully like a bargaining chip. She’ll lose Mulder in the new world order, but she’ll have her son. We don’t see Skinner give a final answer; he makes his disgust clear, but Monica does the same every time she and CSM are alone together, and that doesn’t seem to have stopped her from joining forces with the devil.

Monica’s about-face from the loyal friend who drove Scully to the middle of nowhere and delivered her baby to a traitor only interested in self-protection still doesn’t track, and we’re no closer to understanding why she’s doing this than we were two years ago. It’s especially confusing given how easily this episode could have switched Monica and Spender’s roles, and how much closer that would bring them each to the people they were in the original series; Mulder’s half-brother Jeffrey Spender already spent years trying to get out of their father’s shadow, with limited success. He got his shot at redemption in the end, but Reyes, before now, never needed to be redeemed.

And yet it’s Spender — who returned in season 9’s “William,” disfigured from CSM’s tests, and gave William a shot of magnetite meant to make him useless to the aliens — who was apparently entrusted with hiding Scully’s baby. He comes to her in the hospital like a ghost of X-Files past (looking much better — his father must have given him the name of his face guy) and tells her that a man came after him in search of William. Then, at her urging, he gives up the name of the boy’s adoptive family: Van De Kamp. Spender disappears so quickly that it’s tempting to think he isn’t real, just a product of Scully’s mind. But products of Scully’s mind don’t leave voicemails for Mulder…probably. (Next: Don’t have visions and drive)

Scully checks herself out of the hospital against her doctor’s wishes and barely makes it to the office before collapsing, then decides it’s a good idea to get behind the wheel, which seems inadvisable even for someone whose visions just told her she’s the savior of mankind. The threat of watching Mulder die obviously has her rattled. “I have to find our son,” she tells him over the phone. “You need him, and I need you.” She’s barely on the road before she crashes, bringing her one attempt at having any agency at all in this scenario to a violent halt.

Miller and Einstein witness the crash and make themselves useful by returning Scully to the hospital, where Mr. Y’s goon finds her. (Why kill Scully? If he’s out to stop CSM’s plan, why not go straight to CSM?) He smothers and strangles her as she struggles in vain beneath him, an especially upsetting visual given what we’re about to learn. Scully’s consistent helplessness in this episode is an unfortunate complement to the reveal that ends it.

Mulder, who definitely did not drive back to D.C. below the speed limit, comes up from behind and garottes the guy to save the day, and she and Mulder share a moment in the hospital hallway. She reasons that the Smoking Man didn’t send the goon because he “won’t harm” her — but of course, he already has — and suggests that she’s figured out the source of her visions: William. “I don’t know how,” she admits, “but I know that he’s guiding me. And you.” That idea, at least, is a promising one. It also gives the pair that requisite procedural excuse to get back to business as usual: They don’t have to look for William because William will find them.

But first, Skinner and Mulder have to get into a confrontation. Mulder isn’t pleased that his boss was so little help while Scully was in danger; Skinner probably isn’t pleased that he’s in possession of information that will change his agents’ lives. The final scene of the hour takes us back to Skinner’s conversation with CSM, who reveals that his interest in William — and in Scully — is more sinister than any of them knew. It dates back to season 7’s “En Ami” (written by the Smoking Man himself, William B. Davis), in which CSM lured Scully on a road trip with the false promise of a cure for cancer.

We flash to that episode’s stomach-turning low point: CSM pulling up to a house, with Scully asleep in the passenger seat, and slipping on a pair of leather gloves. She woke up the next morning in pajamas that weren’t hers and accused CSM of drugging her, which he denied. Interestingly, something’s been changed: In the original episode, CSM says he carried her alone, but here the dialogue has been tweaked to include a housekeeper who apparently helped. Why add a witness? Will that “housekeeper” turn out to be Erika Price? Or is this shift meant to tip us off that CSM is manipulating the truth again? Even the tag at the end of the opening credits is a reminder to trust no one, as “I want to believe” fades to read “I want to lie.”

But the suggestion on its own is disturbing enough, and it’s the kiss of death for an episode that suffered from a clunky script but at least felt more in line with the original series’ themes, playing down those touchy chemtrail conspiracy theories and playing up the disdain for powerful manipulators. The first two parts of “My Struggle” are an admittedly low bar to clear, but before the final twist, I preferred this hour, which finds Mulder and Scully’s relationship in a better place and makes a better showcase for David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson’s 25-year history. And yet there’s no escaping that ending. Scully was raped (by “science”?) and she still doesn’t know it, and Mulder might be his son’s half-brother. It’s enough to make you wish the aliens would just come back and end the world already.

EW.com

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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:04

'X-Files' Season 11 Premiere - Recap With Spoilers

By Charlie Ridgely - January 3, 2018

The new season begins with the Cigarette Smoking Man talking about his history with the U.S. government, and reveals that his real name is Carl Gerhardt Bush. He explains that he's seen what goes on behind the scenes and that people wouldn't understand the truth. Bush confirms that he is indeed the father to both Mulder and Jeffrey Spender. He then says that he's going to leave his mark on history and prove to his sons that he was right all along.

Old footage from the moon landing zooms out to reveal a movie set, and a young Cigarette Smoking Man was behind the staging of the event.

Scully, sitting at a computer, thinks back to the night when she looked up into the beam of light coming from the UFO. Suddenly, Scully is on the ground with Mulder and a paramedic standing over her. She's taken in for treatment for a seizure. Both Mulder and Skinner follow to the ambulance. The doctor says Scully has extremely abnormal activity in her brain. They all look at her brain activity charts and Skinner observes that there is a code hidden within her brainwaves, saying, "Find him."

Mulder goes into Scully's room to see how she's doing. Skinner is trying to convince that the signal in Scully's brain is telling them to find William, though Mulder doesn't really believe him. Mulder tells Skinner to go look for answers, but he's going to stay at Scully's side.

A lot is happening in Scully's brain. She thinks about the entire virus outbreak that happened and suddenly wakes up, speaking Mulder's name. She tells him he has to find the smoking man and talks about the Spartan virus that spreads across the world. It doesn't seem like the Spartan Virus as actually happened, and Mulder assures Scully that he's not dying and that there is now plague. Scully then says that the Smoking Man is alive and that he's in Spartanburg, South Carolina. She tells Mulder to find the Smoking Man and stop him before he's killed. It's clear that Mulder doesn't entirely believe her.

Jeffrey Spender is in a parking garage when he's chased down by a man in a car. The man keeps telling Jeffrey that he "only wants the boy." Spender escapes, worried.

Scully is trying to convince the doctor that her visions are real, and the doctor says that there is a chance her visions could have actually been brought on by something real. She wants to leave to try and find the smoking man but Mulder makes her stay put. He will track down the man. As he exits the hospital, Mulder gets multiple messages from Spender. Scully lies in bed, having more visions of the virus. One of the visions shows Mulder in a car accident.

Mulder listens to a message from Spender and he's told that someone is coming for his son, William. The Smoking Man is listening to the conversation and he says that Mulder will soon be coming after him. He's talking to Reyes, who stands by his side and lights his cigarette. A mysterious driver takes off down the road, trailing Mulder, and the Smoking Man warns that he is not to be found.

COMMERCIAL BREAK.

Mulder is driving down the road, trying to make sense of Scully's visions. He realizes that he's being followed. Meanwhile, the Smoking Man talks to Reyes of his plans to get rid of Mulder.

A car chase breaks out between Mulder and the mystery driver, which ends with the latter being hit at an intersection. He takes back off after Mulder, but the X-Files agent was hidden in an alley. Scully has more visions over her son and she wakes up to see Spender standing at her bed. He warns Scully that someone is coming for her son and she asks him to break his promise and tell her where he's hidden. He gives her the name Van de Camp; the last name of the couple who adopted her son. Scully then tries to leave the hospital.

The Smoking Man is trying to figure out who is going after Mulder and Scully's son, and he admits that the boy is his weakness.

Mulder reaches South Carolina by following the other driver and thinks that Scully's visions might have actually been right. Scully then calls him and talks about Spender's visit. She's escaped the hospital and tells Mulder he needs to find William. More visions come to Scully, along with a massive headache, and she drops to her knees.

COMMERCIAL BREAK

Scully is unconscious on the floor of Mulder's office. The Smoking Man then tells Reyes that the people he's killing are just about cleaning out the mess, and he hints at a secret bond between he and William. He then says that he worries for Scully but that he needs to be sure to find William first. He and Reyes tease that they're going to try and stop Mulder at any cost.

Mulder follows the driver to the driveway of a mansion and peers inside to see a man smoking a cigarette. He sneaks around the property until he finds a way inside. When he gets to the parlor, he finds that the man smoking the cigarette is a different one than we were expecting. Erika Prince is standing in the room as well.

Skinner goes to the office but Scully is nowhere to be found. Her phone however, was left behind. Scully drives away but she's having trouble seeing things. Skinner gets in his car where Reyes is waiting for him. The Smoking Man joins them in the front seat. Scully's visions get the best of her and she gets into a terrible car accident.

COMMERCIAL BREAK

Bystanders help Scully out of their car. Meanwhile, Mulder questions the man in the parlor who tells him that the Smoking Man was there not long ago. Neither party seem to know where he is now. The man explains that he was a part of the syndicate with Mulder's father. He then introduces Erika as his "associate." She interrupts and says that the Smoking Man is looking to exterminate humanity.

The Smoking Man is trying to offer Skinner a deal. He pulls the virus out of his pocket and explains what's happening to Skinner. At the same time, Erika explains that same plan to Mulder, calling it the end of history. She tells Mulder that he needs to kill the Smoking man, even though that means he may never see his son again. The Smoking Man offers Skinner immunity from the virus if he can locate William. Erika explains that the Syndicate used to want to save humanity but the Smoking Man flipped on them once the aliens arrived. The Smoking Man spins a different story for Skinner, saying the aliens brought the seeds of humanity's destruction. He says that the world is in its last stage of survival, and a select few already have the blood needed to survive the end. Erika and the man reveal to Mulder that, if they can stop the Smoking Man, they can begin colonizing space. Mulder doesn't believe them. They say that only a select few can go, just like Smoking Man says only a select few can survive on Earth.

Mulder is convinced that Scully can still save humanity. In the parking garage, the Smoking Man and Reyes were ready to leave but Skinner told them that he wasn't finished yet.

COMMERCIAL BREAK

Mulder speeds down the road, calling Skinner. He doesn't answer because the Smoking Man is in the car. Skinner asks why they want the boy so bad.

Scully is in the hospital recovering when two FBI agents show up. Both Miller and Einstein are there to see her. They tell the doctors they are the ones who found Scully and that they brought her in because of the medical band on her wrist. The doctor then calls Mulder to tell him.

As Einstein and Miller leave, a mysterious man brushes by them and heads into Scully's room. It's the driver that was chasing Mulder. He draws the curtain close in her room and puts a pillow on her face, trying to suffocate her. Scully fights back but the man grabs a hold of her throat. Just when she's about to stop breathing, Mulder enters and kills the man. He realizes that there are two different sides of the truth that they are trapped between. Mulder tells Scully that he knew the man that tried to kill her and she tells him that she's aware he wasn't sent by the Smoking Man. She knows that the Smoking Man would never hurt her.

Mulder then says that Scully's visions are correct and she says that they're being sent to her by William. She also assures Mulder that the Smoking Man won't act until he has William. The plan is to wait and continue working on the truth in the X-Files until William can come and find them. Skinner then arrives and tells Mulder that he never got his call. When the two confront one another Skinner wants to drop the conversation and Mulder says that he smells like smoke.

Flashback to the car and the Smoking Man is explaining why he wants to save Scully. It goes all the way back to the very beginning of her time with the X-Files. He reveals that he impregnated her with alien DNA to create the first superhuman the world has ever seen. Mulder isn't the father of William, the Smoking Man is.

William is seen, shaking with an incredible amount of pain.

THE END.


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:12

‘The X-Files’ Review: Season 11 Premiere Features Some Dangerous Retconning and One Truly Disturbing Twist

As nice as it is to see Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny together on screen, the mythology-heavy premiere is a narrative mess.

Liz Shannon Miller
Jan 3, 2018 9:00 pm
@lizlet


Robert Falconer/FOX

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for “The X-Files” Season 11, Episode 1, “My Struggle III.”]

Previously, on “The X-Files”…

FBI Agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson), after many years away, returned to the basement to investigate the strange and unexplained. At the end of Season 10, a global epidemic called the Spartan Virus had begun to dismantle human civilization as we know it, with Scully scrambling to find a cure to save Mulder — only to find herself blinded by the light of an alien spaceship…

This Week’s Dossier

While at the end of “My Struggle II,” it’s Mulder who’s on the brink of death, “My Struggle III” flips the switch and resets the clock, as Scully is consumed by visions of the events of the previous episode. They may be predictions of what’s to come, or they might be writer/director Chris Carter attempting to retcon his way out of the narrative hole dug by Season 10.

Either way, Mulder’s healthy but Scully proceeds to go in and out of the hospital a whole bunch, receiving both good visitors (our old pal Jeffrey Spender, looking a lot better than the last time we saw him, not to mention Season 10’s Miller and Einstein) and bad visitors (a guy who attempts to smother her in her sleep, who Mulder basically flat-out murders with a scalpel).

Mulder makes some new friends, too: two new conspiracy wonks (played by AC Peterson and Barbara Hershey) who reveal that Cigarette Smoking Man’s ultimate goal is the extinction of the human race (via the aforementioned except not really aforementioned Spartan virus). The aliens aren’t interested in invading Earth anymore, by the way, as we’ve done such a good job of trashing it.

So: Conspiracies abound, Cigarette Smoking Man is scheming like crazy, and Mulder and Scully will return to investigating the weird next week — unaware that CSM has just unloaded a massive secret on Assistant Director Skinner: Scully’s son William, long ago given up for adoption, is actually CSM’s secret science baby.



Wait, Explain It to Me Like I’m Five

Everything that happened in “My Struggle II” basically didn’t happen… or, at least, it hasn’t happened yet. Scully has weird visions of her son and keeps collapsing. Mulder drives a fancy car real fast. Smoking Man is definitely Mulder and Spender’s father, and he also claims to be the father of Scully’s son through “science.” And “The X-Files” once again demonstrated its massive blind spot for the issue of consent, especially when it comes to Scully.

Ultra-Nerd Facts

Sometimes, it seems like CCC has absolutely no memory whatsoever of the previous 208 episodes of “The X-Files”… and then he throws us a curveball like resurrecting a question we never really wanted answered: What happened between Scully and Cigarette Smoking Man during their ill-fated road trip in the Season 7 episode “En Ami”?

Honestly, we were happy living in ignorant bliss on this one, because as recapped by the end of “My Struggle III,” there’s no ducking around it: Scully was violated without her knowledge by Cigarette Smoking Man in Season 7, to a degree that may well deserve the label of “rape.”

More than once over the course of the show’s run, Scully’s autonomy over her body has been stripped away: She was abducted multiple times (by both the government and many serial killers), had her ova harvested against her will, and apparently she’s now infused with full-on alien DNA; all of which speak to the fact that working on the X-Files is a pretty sucky gig, but especially for Scully.

This latest development might be a step too far; certainly we’re quite concerned with how this will all get wrapped up (or not at all) when “My Struggle IV,” the Season 11 finale, airs. It has always been a troubling aspect of the show, the fact that one of sci-fi TV’s most iconic female characters is often victimized in this way, but we also know that when it comes to “The X-Files,” especially when Chris Carter is in control, the actual truth is rarely a certain thing.



In the meantime, onto what really matters…

Makeout Watch

Why yes, it’s another episode of “The X-Files” where Mulder and Scully maintain something of a platonic distance (though there is some nice bedside handholding), and it’s easy to feel disquieted by the questioning of  William’s paternity. But the fact that Mulder and Scully still believe that William is their mutual son is evidence that they have, in fact, been to Pound Town at least once (and that’s not the only proof, when you consider the many indicators we’ve enjoyed over the years, from dropped references in dialogue to the way they wouldn’t stop making out during the Season 9 finale).

It’s still not totally clear what the state of their relationship is, at least in to relation to years past, but whatever is coming for them in Season 11, at least they’re starting things off on something resembling the same page, unified by their decades-old bond.

“I’m not going to ask you if you just said what I think you just said, because I know it’s what you just said.” (Most Awkward Quote)

Let’s just take this opportunity to say that “The X-Files” has, in the past, shown itself to have an elegant touch with voice-over. That tradition does not carry over here, as “My Struggle III” is bogged down by Mulder’s meaningless ramblings, nearly to the point of self-parody.



“Dear Diary: Today my heart lept when Agent Scully suggested ‘spontaneous human combustion.'” (Best Quote)

Perhaps the best quote of the night came during that quick flashback to the Spender family watching the (faked) moon landing; “That’s how heroes are made,” Cigarette Smoking Man grumbles to his family.

Final Report

On some level, “My Struggle III” is a stronger season premiere than Season 10’s “My Struggle I.” It at least has some forward momentum, and there are fewer deadly dull Powerpoint presentations. It’s still pretty talky, though, and some of these story decisions are almost painful. What exactly was Spender doing there, exactly? Did anyone but the most loyal of fans remember that Spender even existed? And why would Scully, a medical doctor, do something as dumb as get behind the wheel of a car while clearly ill? And we could go on.

So it could have been worse, but there really weren’t any redeeming aspects to the episode in the long run. William B. Davis still knows how to sell his laidback sense of evil, but while he might be the most iconic of all “X-Files” villains, the impact of Carl Gerhardt Busch Spender — or whatever his name might be — has basically fizzled out at this point.

What’s left behind is subpar storytelling with none of the show’s original charm; if Fox hadn’t supplied additional episodes to critics a few weeks ago, we’d be very, very worried about what Season 11 has in store. And even while future weeks promise case-file fun, “My Struggle III’s” most disturbing twist has us concerned that the ultimate endgame for the season will continue to damage this one-time critically acclaimed series’ legacy.

Grade: C-


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:15

X-Files Season 11 Premiere- How COULD You, Chris Carter?

Posted by Mary Anne Butler January 3, 2018

Just when I thought I couldn’t be more angry and upset as an X-Files fan after season 10, we get tonight’s season 11 premiere. Chris Carter, the series creator who both wrote and directed tonight’s episode has always said he’s the worst at dealing with his own series’ mythos, and it REALLY showed.

Obviously, I’ll be talking about the episode, so if you haven’t seen it and don’t want spoilers, find something else to read.


Gillian Anderson as Agent Scully in the same position I was in while watching tonight’s episode.

“My Struggle III” was not good as an episode of tv. As an episode of X-Files? Even worse. Undoing every bit of character development built over so many episodes and YEARS with dialog and motivations that would NEVER CROSS THESE CHARACTER’S MINDS. It’s like everyone working on this revisit, this revival season, have no idea what their source material is. X-Files was never THIS melodramatic; minus one or two scenes over a vast list of strong episodic material.

Do you guys remember how there was that big stink about there being NO WOMEN in the X-Files season 11 writer’s room? Remember how even Gillian Anderson (who plays Agent Scully) commented on how disappointed she was by this? Anderson wrote and directed an episode of the series in its 7th season, it’s one of my personal favorites, so it stands to reason she understands what the landscape would be in the writer’s room for the show. It was only AFTER the public outcry that FOX admitted that “oh yeah, we’ve got two women directing this season”, but still no writers. I’m not saying women NEED to be included because they’re women, but you’re telling me there weren’t at least one or two highly qualified female writers who know the mythos inside and out?

If tonight’s episode is ANY indication of what’s in store for season 11….I’m not sure I’ll be able to continue. I’m all for shaking things up, for coming at a ‘remake’ with your own vision and not doing exactly what came before….but not like this.

With so much rich history to pull from, if you REALLY want to rewrite these major plot points, maybe NOT go to CSM raping Scully to impregnate her as a plot device?

No, really. To quote a previous X-Files episode, “THIS CANNOT BE HAPPENING.”

Admittedly, CSM is not meant to be liked. He’s done some truly horrible things to the people in his life (like Cassandra) and to the human race at large (depending on when in the series mythos you’re looking), but to now say he’s a rapist? Are you KIDDING? And even worse than that…you’ve put that deplorable act with Scully as the recipient?

CSM is NOT that guy. He’s just not, and I cannot in good faith believe you’ve got the best reasoning for this, Carter. We KNOW how that episode went on the lake, you even called back to it with the flashbacks in tonight’s episode. She was undressed. She woke up in a bed, not in the clothes she fell asleep in. To do this to that character, after everything else she went through during the series and movies, it’s unforgivable.

My only hope at this point is that CSM is lying. We know he’s lied before and often and well. To do away with that beautiful story of Scully coming to Mulder to ask his help in getting pregnant way back when, to say “that isn’t the case”, just….heartbreaking.

Carter has taken some leaps (of course, it’s the frakking X-Files, it’s not meant to follow convention) in the series history, but he has NEVER been so disingenuous with his characters.

The only positive thing I can say about tonight’s shit show of an episode is that I would totally watch a young CSM spinoff series.

The X-Files airs on FOX on Wednesday nights.

(Last Updated January 3, 2018 11:44 pm )


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:22



‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Debut Recap ‘My Struggle III’: Find Him

By NerdcoreMovement • January 4, 2018

In the recap for ‘The X-Files’ season 11 debut, Scully reveals an apocalyptic vision as she tries to convince Mulder that they have to find their son…

By Damon Martin — Editor/Lead Writer

‘The X-Files’ is back for season 11 in what might just be the last 10 episodes of the long running series.

Gillian Anderson has said that season 11 would be her last ride as Agent Dana Scully and ‘X-Files’ creator Chris Carter has stated that he can’t imagine doing a show without her. That means this 10 episode run might be the last that we ever get of ‘The X-Files’ and the show is off to a running start so far.

Following a cliffhanger that ended season 10 last year, ‘The X-Files’ picks up with a big twist to start season 11, unmaking a great deal of what unfolded at the end of the previous set of episodes.

Still, the set up for what could happen now in potentially the final season of ‘The X-Files’ is rather intriguing, especially considering the way that Carter continues to unravel past plots and make new creative choices for the series that won’t necessarily be applauded by some long time fans of the show.

For Carter, the key is making the show he always envisioned and there’s something commendable about a creator sticking to what he wanted for the show no matter how many people might complain about his choices.

One of those was the big twist at the end of the debut episode for season 11 so with that said, let’s recap the latest ‘The X-Files’ titled ‘My Struggle III’….

Apocalypse Now



At the end of last season of ‘The X-Files’, Scully was rushing to find her son William in hopes that his stem cells could be used to save Mulder from a deadly alien virus called ‘the Spartan virus’ that was being unleashed upon the world in a planned Armageddon. Scully was immune thanks to her own DNA being spliced with an alien when she was impregnated with William but she was on a mission to save Mulder when an alien ship arrived over a bridge and a light came shining down on them just before the series faded to black.

As the latest episode of ‘The X-Files’ picks up with Scully laying on the office floor with blood coming from her face as Mulder rushes her to the hospital. When Scully finally awakens, she reveals that the apocalyptic scene from the season 10 finale was actually just a vision in her own head. It was a premonition of sorts and Scully believes that all of the events that were unfolding will actually take place including the alien virus being unleashed to wipe out the majority of the human population — Mulder being among them.

The doctor at the hospital remarks how Scully’s brain is on fire with so much activity and Assistant FBI Director William Skinner remarks how the patterns on her MRI are reading like Morse code. In fact, Skinner decodes the message to read “find him”, which he believes refers to Mulder and Scully’s son William.

As much as Scully wants to convince Mulder that her vision of the future is true, he’s more concerned about her well being. Still, Scully continues ranting about the visions including the fact that the Cigarette Smoking Man is still very much alive and pulling the strings behind this planned apocalypse and he’s currently staying in South Carolina.

Mulder is skeptical at best, especially after watching his father die in an explosion years ago, but still he promises to look into everything to try and figure out what’s happening to Scully.

Meanwhile, Jeffrey Spender reappears for the first time since the original series finale — along with a new face — and he’s run down by a car in his apartment complex before narrowly making his escape. The assailant trapped outside a locked door shouts at Jeffrey to tell him where William is at and this will all be over. Spender doesn’t tell him anything but instead calls his half-brother Mulder to share this information with him instead.

When Mulder gets the message, the Cigarette Smoking Man is monitoring the call, which leads to him making a hasty exit while his son jumps in his car to search for answers.

Alien Autopsy



The episode actually begins with a run through history courtesy of the Cigarette Smoking Man, who actually reveals his real identity after all this time — his name is Carl Gerhardt Bush.

A past episode from ‘The X-Files’ featured a similar Forrest Gump like travel through history featuring the Cigarette Smoking Man but this one ends with a younger version directing a choreographed moon landing, proving that Neil Armstrong never actually landed anywhere except a sound stage in Hollywood.

During the speech, the Cigarette Smoking Man also confirms that both Mulder and Jeffrey Spender are his sons, although judging by what he’s done to each of them, he’s not exactly going for Father of the Year any time soon.

This all leads to the Cigarette Smoking Man explaining his plans to Monica Reyes, who remains by his side for some unexplainable reason, but two very important things are revealed here. First, the Cigarette Smoking Man admits that he could never hurt Scully but Mulder is going to get in the way of his plans and has to die. Second, the Cigarette Smoking Man is desperate to find William as well while admitting that the boy is his weak spot. More on that later.

With the intercepted call from Spender to Mulder, the Cigarette Smoking Man packs up his belongings and hits the road with Reyes as to avoid an encounter with his son, who will more than likely arrive at any moment.

As for Mulder, he leaves the hospital after getting the voicemail from Spender but along the way he notices that he’s being trailed by another car. He find a way to lose his tail in a car crash but the person chasing after him quickly shakes off the accident and gets back on his trail. Unfortunately the person hunting for Mulder can’t find him because he’s actually tailing the bad guy now.

Mulder follows the goon through three states overnight until they finally arrive in South Carolina — the exact site where Scully claimed the Cigarette Smoking Man was alive and well.

When Mulder finally makes his way inside the mansion where the man he’s been following stopped, he encounters a surprise. Rather than finding the Cigarette Smoking Man, Mulder instead runs into somebody known as ‘Mr. Y’ along with his associate Erika Price.

Mr. Y proceeds to tell Mulder that the Cigarette Smoking Man is very much alive and was at this residence not that long ago but he made his escape. He then tells Mulder that he was part of the Syndicate — the shadowy group of powerful men tasked with the planned apocalypse of the world thanks to the alien invaders about to take over the planet.

At the same time this conversation is happening, the Cigarette Smoking Man reappears in Washington D.C. where he takes Skinner hostage along with Monica Reyes where he makes a proposal to the assistant director for the FBI.

The Cigarette Smoking Man and Mr. Y offered varied versions of the same story that led to this planned apocalypse. Cigarette Smoking Man sticks to his story that the aliens arrived and releasing this deadly virus is the way to wipe out the majority of humanity with only a few survivors left in the aftermath when our new overlords arrive to rule the planet. Mr. Y says that the Syndicate was tasked with saving humanity until the Cigarette Smoking Man flipped on them after the aliens arrived.

According to Mr. Y, the aliens showed up but had no real interest in taking over the planet because we’ve already tapped most of the natural resources and there’s really not much left for them to conquer. But the Cigarette Smoking Man still managed to harvest the deadly virus from the alien in an effort to carry out his plot of Armageddon.

Mr. Y then tells Mulder that they have a different agenda — they want him to kill the Cigarette Smoking Man and while the virus may still be released, they plan on launching space colonization and he will be given a spot so long as he carries out their orders.

As for the Cigarette Smoking Man, he offers Skinner a vaccine to the alien virus so long as he agrees to help them find William. Skinner seems disgusted to even be in the same vicinity as the Cigarette Smoking Man yet he’s not getting out of the car just yet. What he finds out next changes everything.

I Am Your Father



Back at the hospital, Scully wakes up from another hazy dream state with all sorts of visions dancing through her head but this time she’s greeted by Jeffrey Spender, who has come to warn her that someone is looking for William. It seems Jeffrey was tasked with placing William into an adopted home where he would be far away from his parents and thus out of danger.

Scully begs him to tell her where William is at but he will only reveal one thing — the name of the people who adopted him — Van De Camp.

Spender makes a quick exit and Scully isn’t far behind as she insists on leaving the hospital to go search for her son. Unfortunately, Scully’s trip is cut short after she begins experiencing visions again in the car and she ends up in a crash. Thankfully, agents Miller and Einstein happened to be nearby and they saw the crash before bringing Scully back to the hospital.

She’s not any safer there, however, as the goon who originally led Mulder back to that mansion in South Carolina has returned and he’s been tasked with killing Scully. The man almost succeeds but Mulder shows up just in time to slit his throat and keep Scully alive.

Mulder then confirms much of what Scully saw in her visions was true including the Cigarette Smoking Man being alive and his planned Armageddon with the Spartan virus. They both still have questions about this would be assassin but Scully assures Mulder that the Cigarette Smoking Man wasn’t responsible for sending him here. She knows that he would never hurt her but Scully is convinced that he’s also hunting for William.

That leads Scully to reveal that she believes William is the one sending her these apocalyptic visions in an attempt to warn his parents about what’s coming for them.

Back in Skinner’s car, the Cigarette Smoking Man then unveils the second part of his story about why he’s so interested in William and would never lay a hand on Scully.

The story stretches back to ‘The X-Files’ season 7 when the Cigarette Smoking Man abducted Scully and drugged her under the guise that he would offer her the cure for cancer. It’s here where the Cigarette Smoking Man reveals to Skinner that it was during that trip that he impregnated Scully with the alien-science that he had concocted in an effort to create the first person with super human abilities.

In his mind, the Cigarette Smoking Man is William’s father just like he’s father to both Mulder and Spender as well. The shocking revelation shakes Skinner, who is never seen giving his answer to the Cigarette Smoking Man about his deal but it certainly seems like he accepted the offer.

Back at the hospital, Mulder is infuriated that Skinner didn’t do more to protect Scully and after smelling smoke on him, he believes that his long time boss is now in coordination with the Cigarette Smoking Man on his conspiracy to wipe out humanity.

Still while they are waiting to find William, Scully tells her partner that there’s nothing more they can do but to continue to work the X-Files while continuing to look for clues that will stop this orchestrated Armageddon. In other words, ‘The X-Files’ will largely go back to business as usual for the next six or seven episodes until the story involving William, the Cigarette Smoking Man and the Syndicate wraps up towards the end of the season.

‘The X-Files’ returns with a brand new episode next Wednesday night at 8pm ET on FOX.


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:28

There’s a Secret Message Hidden at the End of ‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Premiere

Listen closely at the end of “The X-Files” Season 11 premiere and you might hear some alien-sounding voices that are actually hiding a secret

Phil Hornshaw and Phil Owen | Last Updated: January 3, 2018 @ 11:38 PM


Fox

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the premiere episode of “The X-Files” Season 11.)

“The X-Files” has always been steeped in secret alien abductions, government conspiracies and mysterious secrets. The premiere episode of Season 11, “My Struggle III,” is full of references to the show’s lore and its main villain, the Smoking Man.

But in addition to a big retcon of the events at the end of Season 10, a number of twists and turns along the way, and a ton of new information about the decades-long conspiracies the show is known for, there’s another secret hidden in the episode.

At the close of the premiere, there’s a shot of a young man, presumably William, the son of Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson). William is obviously struggling, and as the music rises, it’s possible to hear what sound like strange, squeaky alien voices cutting through the other sounds. While the sounds themselves come off as the creepy, alien influence acting on William, it turns out they’re actually hiding a message.

If you reverse the sound of the voices and slow it down, it turns out that the alien speech is actually a digitally distorted human voice. We had trouble making it out, but Reddit user JordinGoff posted their results on YouTube, along with an interpretation that sounds pretty accurate based on our own manipulations of the audio.

According to JordinGoff, the message is: “If this is the end, it’s been a wild, wild adventure with some of the finest people I know and the greatest fans that we could’ve hoped for. Here’s to you. The truth is out there, 2018.”

Presumably the message comes from “The X-Files” creator Chris Carter, although the voice is distorted, which makes it tough to tell (although if you lower the pitch by about 50 percent, the message winds up sounding a lot more like Carter). With 9 original seasons and a two-season revival in the bag, it makes sense that Carter would take a chance to thank the fans that helped make it all possible.


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:34

X-Files Season 11 Premiere Review: A Messy Start Leads to Better Episodes

By Kevin Yeoman 10 hours ago



FOX and The X-Files continue to ride the TV revival wave, with the latter finding it hard to recreate that old mid-‘90s television magic at the onset of season 11 — or its second revival season, if you will. When the series first announced its return for a six-episode event back in 2015 the news was met with equal parts anticipation and trepidation. And while it only scored one truly successful episode out of those six (Darin Morgan’s ‘Mulder and Scully Meet The Were-Monster’), FOX and Chris Carter seemed interested in continuing the search for the Truth that was presumably still out there.

The continuation of a not entirely successful outing already bearing the divisive moniker “revival” — a term too often treated with undeserved blanketed derision — puts The X-Files in a tricky place, one where the show’s fan base, presumably comprised of staunch true believers whose devotion to the subject matter is rivaled only by Fox Mulder himself, were essentially converted into skeptics. That’s normally the job of Gillian Anderson’s Dana Scully, as the actress’ insistence season 11 is the end of the road for both her and her FBI counterpart casts a shadow over these next 10 episodes.

The skepticism ultimately works in the favor of The X-Files; it sets an appropriately lower bar following season 10, one that, as Carter recently stated, was still shaking off the cobwebs of being decommissioned for over a decade. Unfortunately, with ‘My Struggle III’, the season 11 premiere suggests Carter and Co. are still taking a broom to the dusty corners of their series. The new season’s first outing is a clumsy affair that, in terms of quality, feels like a true continuation of the season 10 finale, ‘My Struggle II.’ There is almost no improvement over how ungainly the two “mythology” episodes from last season were, as part three struggles to strike a balance between making sense of the labyrinthine machinations of the plot, the importance of Mulder and Scully’s son William, and what role the Cigarette Smoking Man plays in the whole thing.



The episode assumes the shape and form of an X-Files season premiere, but struggles to deliver a totally convincing product. All the necessary parts are there — the aforementioned Anderson, David Duchovny, Mitch Pileggi, William B. Davis, and even Annabeth Gish pops up as Agent Monica Reyes. But the manner in which the plot unfolds is so janky, the overwhelming sensation is that the production has merely aproximate the tried and true X-Files formula, but still comes up short.

Much of the fault lies in the execution of the hour. The ideas are all sound — or at least sound enough the seem like the stuff The X-Files is made of — but they’re presented in such a hurried and inelegant fashion you have to wonder if Carter inadvertently cleared the cobwebs of a different show entirely. There are so many twists, turns, and surprise reveals in the first hour that every time the series seems to be saying, “But wait, there’s more,” it comes across more like, “Just kidding; we have no idea what’s going on, either.” It’s not outside The X-Files’ wheelhouse to deliberately obfuscate the truth or attempt to confound its audience with mind-blowing revelations, but the manner in which those efforts are carried out in ‘My Struggle III’ undermine whatever thrill the purported revelations might have elicited.

Duchovny and Anderson both seem a little bored but are otherwise present. That might have something to do with Scully being in and out of consciousness and plagued with strange visions of her son, while Mulder becomes a character in a Dashiell Hammett novel, complete with hard-boiled voiceover as he evades the burly men tailing him as he tracks down the Cigarette Smoking Man. His efforts find him chasing the wrong people after a run-in with the mysterious Erika Price played by Barbara Hershey, who sets up one of several lengthy monologues during the hour that’s intended to explain what the hell is going on, but really only muddies the water further.



Thankfully, whatever slack ‘My Struggle III’ struggles with early on is largely picked up by Pileggi and Davies, who both go full bore with the kind of commitment the series could not have done without. A great deal of the heavy lifting falls on Davis as he’s tasked with explaining the somewhat modified mythology of the series moving forward and also addressing the seemingly Quixotic quest for the Truth in the time of fake news.

The bombshell delivered by the Cigarette Smoking Man at the end of the gives The X-Files the kind of “ick” factor it hasn’t had in years, and also, on a personal level, complicates things for Mulder and Scully’s relationship and roles as parents. But the threat of a contagion wiping out most of humankind and the thought of the undying CSM being William’s father does little to assuage concerns about the show’s quality. Thankfully, though, FOX sent out additional episodes to critics, and the season does improve considerably as it goes along. Whether or not ‘My Struggle IV’ can count itself among those improved episodes remains to be seen, but even though The X-Files stumbles out of the gate in season 11, it seems there’s still some life left in Mulder and Scully’s search for the Truth after all.

The X-Files continues next Wednesday with ‘This’ @8pm on FOX.


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:38

How The X-Files Finally Resolved That Huge Season 10 Cliffhanger

By Laura Hurley
10 hours ago



Warning: gigantic spoilers ahead for "My Struggle III," the Season 11 premiere of The X-Files on Fox.

Season 10 of The X-Files ended on such a crazy cliffhanger that fans would have been seriously out of luck if the stars never aligned for Season 11 to happen. Fortunately, all the pieces fell into place, and the eleventh season just premiered on Fox to pay off on the Season 10 cliffhanger, which had left Mulder on the verge of death, the population of the world falling desperately sick, Scully racing to figure out how to save everybody, and a spaceship hovering overhead just as Scully declared that Mulder needed stem cells from William in order to survive. "My Struggle III" was tasked with paying off on that ending, and it did so in a way that few of us probably predicted.

As it turns out, most of the Season 10 finale didn't actually happen. Instead, it happened in precognitive visions shared between the long-lost William and Scully. The X-Files creator Chris Carter spoke to CinemaBlend about all things X, and he explained just how much of the Season 10 finale didn't happen:

So everything after the phone call in Mulder's office that Scully takes at the beginning of the season finale last year is in her head.

According to Chris Carter, everything except for about the first five minutes of the Season 10 finale was all in Scully's head and hadn't actually happened yet. The good news for everybody on the show is that the world isn't basically ending yet, the population of the planet isn't already actively being drastically reduced, and Mulder isn't yet circling the drain; the bad news is that the Cigarette-Smoking Man still has plans in place to make all these horrors happen, and there's only a select few people that he cares about actually saving.

The Season 11 premiere revealed that Scully and William are at least guaranteed to survive, although Cancer Man's attachment to them is decidedly creepy. He explained his real connection to Scully and his role in the conception of William in the very same episode in which Monica Reyes accused him of being in love with Scully. It seemed that Old Smokey had given up trying to reach out and save Mulder after all these years, although obviously we should take anything and everything he says with a grain of salt. He hasn't managed to survive for the past quarter of a decade by sticking to one story or dying for his beliefs.

In some ways, "My Struggle III" feels like a reset of Season 10's "My Struggle II," but Chris Carter went on in our chat to explain the real reason why the episode went in such a bold direction:

It was all the way I had planned it. There are four episodes that bookend each of the two series, what we're calling Season 10 and Season 11, and I call them the "My Struggle" series. The first episode in last season was Mulder's struggle and the last episode was Scully's struggle. The first episode this time is the Cigarette-Smoking Man's struggle and the last episode this season will be William's struggle. Those are all of a piece, so I imagined even though I didn't know for sure we would come back this season. I had to imagine how we would come back and there is connective tissue between the series finale last time and the series opener this time. There are shots that I did where we go deep into Scully's eye at the beginning of the series finale last time and then we're pulling out of her eye. This idea that we are in Scully's head was built in to that episode. While it feels like a reset, it is part of an ongoing larger story.

The big mythology episodes of the two revival seasons are a set that deal with the struggles of four main characters, so "My Struggle III" was not a reset so much as a bridge between Scully's ordeals and the Cigarette-Smoking Man's. We've seen three parts of the whole "My Struggle" series so far; everything will undoubtedly come together with the fourth and final part. In the meantime, the way the Season 11 premiere played out means that The X-Files will be able to jump right into some good old-fashioned Monster of the Week episodes without spending episodes on the cleanup of a worldwide contagion.

For more of what Chris Carter had to say about "My Struggle III," check out his comments on that devastating twist about Scully and William courtesy of the Cigarette-Smoking Man. Be sure to take a look at our picks for episodes to rewatch for Season 11, and don't forget to tune in to Fox on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET for new episodes of The X-Files. If you're still in the market for shows to watch on the other nights of the week, swing by our midseason TV premiere guide.


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 4:44



3 Jan 2018

The X-Files: "My Struggle III" Review

William, It Was Really Nothing.

By Matt Fowler

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.

The X-Files is back on FOX for a slightly longer season than its brief run back in 2016 - but also a sharper, steeper climb.

This new season faces a few obstacles that Season 10 didn't. Not only does it not come with the "It's back!" hoopla from before, but that particular splash, after being off the air for a decade, received mixed reactions. "Hit or miss" seemed to be the resounding takeaway from those six revival episodes. Now the buzz has muted a bit and Season 11's got more to prove.

The other hurdle to leap here is the series' new slog against relevance - which may turn out to be its most lethal battle to date. "My Struggle III," the first of this season's two major mythology episodes (the other will be the season finale), like Season 10's bookends, was a muddled, mixed-up race against time that dropped Mulder and Scully into the third act of some dire plot with little grasp onto save for clunky dialogue and overwrought speeches. On top of this, this premiere was also a wipe-clean of "My Struggle II," clumsily erasing the Spartan Virus outbreak (and UFO cliffhanger) in lieu of an "It was all a dream!" cop out.

With the Season 10 finale now acting as only a warning of what could occur, Scully spent most of the time in the hospital tormented by brain transmissions from her hidden son William (she actually made her way out of the ER at one point...only to land right back in it after a car crash) while Mulder drove. And drove. And inner monologued. A lot. In fact, a ton of "My Struggle III" felt like a terrible audio/radio play. Those scenes of Mulder driving intercut with CSM (or C.G.B. - Carl Gerhart Bush?) and Reyes' lofty "the times we live in" chatter was a snore and a chore.

Die hard Files fanatics may not care that the show's core mythos has devolved into nonsense but overall it's worth it to take note of just how unremarkable the series' key conspiracy elements feel here at the outset of 2018. CSM, during one of creator Chris Carter's noble "here's what I think of the world today" speech dumps, claimed that his plot to kill most of humanity wouldn't even make a ripple if it got out because of "fake news" and the rampant trend of not requiring proof or evidence for individual beliefs.

So with that, here's a question: How intriguing is a mass government cover-up of aliens on TV these days? What used to fuel The X-Files' fire now feels fairly quaint. The opening moments of "My Struggle III" - involving a through-the-years CSM looking back at all the nefarious stings he'd pulled - seemed somewhat precious. How much shock is there in learning that JFK's death was a clandestine plot or that the moon landing was faked? There are people these days who believe the freakin' world is flat because of a video they saw once. So while Smoking Man's words may have been intended to speak to The X-Files' possible relevance in today's world, it mostly shined a spotlight on how the show's core dangers, and overarching implications, don't measure up anymore.

Yes, the strangest truth of all is that the show that basically invented the modern procedural (case/monster-of-the-week mixed with serialized background noise/mythology) has now lost its serialized mojo. Not helping matters too is the way these modern X-Files seasons are doled out to us. These abridged seasons don't really allow for the pacing that X-Files-style serialization requires, so we get all the mythology shoved into bookends, which is an immediate disservice. The show would be better suited, if utilizing 5 to 10 episode bursts, with an all-standalone format. It could be that there was a very specific time and place for the larger conspiracy stories X-Files was telling and today's TV climate just isn't it. That's not to say there isn't room for Mulder and Scully - their dynamic, deep affection and care - as an investigative team, but "My Struggle III" sure made a strong case for the Syndicate well running dry.

We got new villains, in Barbara Hershey's Erika Price and some new sinister smoking man played by AC Peterson (these two competing evildoers want to send the 1% into space, you see), and the bizarre unnecessary revelation that William is Cancer Man's son and not Mulder's - creepily now making him Mulder's brother - but it all came off as a rushed, overdone mess.

The Verdict

X-Files' Season 11 premiere had all the hallmarks of fierce Files lore - vast conspiracies, shadowy smoking figures, silent assassins, big reveals - but it all came off as 10 pounds of "truth" in a five-pound bag. Clumsy, harried, and hacky,

Mediocre

In X-Files' Season 11 premiere, Mulder raced to stop a Syndicate conspiracy while Scully landed in the hospital...twice

3 Jan 2018

5.5


IGN


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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 10:35

The X-Files Returns With a… What the Hell Was That?

By Nick Mangione 01.04.2018 :: 11:00AM EST


Gillian Anderson (Cr: Robert Falconer/FOX)

After just over a year, it’s here: The 11th and possibly final season of The X-Files premiered last night with the third part of the “My Struggle” series of alien mythology episodes. It was… well, it was better than the previous two from Season 10, so we’ll give them that. By centering the action around Mulder and Scully, and the affection they clearly have for one another, “My Struggle III” delivered a more focused mythology episode that was easier to get sucked into. Even as the rest of the episode made it impossible to tell just what was going on. If you’re still watching X-Files for the Mulder-Scully shipping (and honestly, if you aren’t at least a little here for that why are you still watching?), this episode had a lot for you. Though they mostly behave like old friends toward each other, the love, affection and yes, the tension is all still there. Scully spends most of the episode in a hospital, so there’s a lot of hand-holding and David Duchovny worrying that should set fan’s hearts aflutter.

Let’s start with the good stuff. The show opens strong. We get an extended monologue from the Cigarette Smoking Man who speaks of the grand alien conspiracy and goes over his role in history’s most important events. Including faking the moon landing. It gets you in the mood for some real conspiracy theory craziness. We even learn his real name. Carl Gerhard Busch Spender. Guess he really wasn’t lying about that C.G.B. thing. Not that it really matters much that we know his name. I’m still going to call him Smoking Man. It just sounds better than calling him “Carl.” The speech does a great job of getting us ready for another season of The X-Files. As for what else it does well… Well, aside from the aforementioned Mulder-Scully shipping, there’s not much else. Almost the best thing I can say about it is that mythology episodes turned garbage even before the series ended its original run. And this one is a little better than garbage. So it’s not like it’s ruining a classic legacy or anything.


David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson (Cr: Robert Falconer/FOX)

Here’s the real frustrating thing. OK, one of the real frustrating things. Remember the end of Season 10? The finale wasn’t great, but that ending made some big promises. Mulder was dying, Scully was trying to save him and a UFO showed up, bathing Scully in a strange light. Man, where was the show going to go from there? It turns out nowhere. That was all just a dream. Or a vision of the future. None of it happened. Chris Carter says that was the plan all along, and foreshadowed in last season’s finale. OK, that doesn’t make it any less lame. So instead of having to answer any of the questions last season set up, we get Scully unconscious in a hospital, sending a message in Morse code to Mulder via… patterns in her brain activity. Sure, why not? The message reads, “Find Him.” Skinner immediately knows she’s telling Mulder to find their son, but Mulder refuses to leave Scully’s side. Look, this is very sweet and all, but these characters sure spend most of this episode refusing to do anything interesting.

Scully wakes up and again tells Mulder to find William, but he decides to go after Cigarette Smoking Man instead. Smoking Man knows this and monologues some more before leaving, allowing Mulder to walk in on two other members of a different conspiracy. Also, Scully leaves the hospital, goes through Mulder’s files and tries to tell him about her visions before having another seizure and ending up back in the hospital. Really not her best episode. What follows is a whole bunch of exposition. I realize the X-Files revival doesn’t have the highest budget, but surely there has to be a better way to deliver this information than having two groups of people standing around, talking. Basically, it comes down to this. Smoking Man wants to release an alien virus that will kill everyone who doesn’t have Alien DNA (which includes Scully and William, but not Mulder). Cigarette Smoking Man corners Agent Skinner in his car, telling him to kill Mulder. The people that Mulder runs into are in on a different conspiracy. They want to colonize space and send an elite group of people up so they’ll survive Smoking Man’s virus. So now we have two factions of evil conspirators. Great. Hey, if there’s one good thing to say about all this exposition, at least it’s getting it out of the way so we can get to the good stuff next week.


William B. Davis (Cr: Robert Falconer/FOX)

Then we get to the biggest reveal of the show, and one that pissed off a lot of fans when it happened. Cigarette Smoking Man reveals that Mulder isn’t actually Willaim’s father. He is. Scientifically. Remember back in Season Seven when Scully woke up in different clothes and accused Smoking Man of drugging her? Yeah, turns out he did. And while she was unconscious, he impregnated her with alien-human baby William. Scientifically. Yeah, no. No no no no no. No. Noooooooooooo. I’m so glad the rest of the season is just standard Case File of the Week stuff because I hate this story so much. Those always have been the better episodes anyway. God, how is the show still this tone deaf? It’s always had problems with how it treats Scully, and instead of taking the opportunity to listen to its fans and learn from its mistakes, it just keeps digging itself deeper and deeper holes. Scully is one of the most iconic women in sci-fi. Hell, she’s one of the best characters in sci-fi. She deserves better than a gross rape storyline like this. No matter how “scientific” it is.


Annabeth Gish and Mitch Pileggi (Cr: Robert Falconer/FOX)

At least the episode ends decently. A mysterious assassin tries to smother Scully in her hospital bed, but Mulder shows up just in time to cut the guy’s throat with a scalpel. Scully makes a full recovery and suggests they keep looking for the truth in the X-Files. This puts all the garbage mythology away for the season and allows the rest of the episodes (aside from the finale) to be cool monster-of-the-week style stories. That’s where this show has always been at its best. Despite the terrible twist at the end, I’m genuinely looking forward to Mulder and Scully getting back to what they do best. We only have a few more episodes of them, and with the 11th season focusing on single, standalone case files, we can enjoy the final season. It gives the show the chance to go out as the engrossing, scary sci-fi series we’ve always loved. Until the season finale, anyway. After this episode, I’m really not looking forward to that.


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Download the new season

Post by Sabine on Thu 4 Jan - 12:13

Do we get a download link for the people outside the US that aren't so lucky to get to see season 11 anytime soon. Pretty please with a cherry on top???
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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 17:10

Why Everyone is Flipping Out Over Last Night’s X-FILES!

Posted by Blair Marnell on January 4, 2018

Warning: There are massive spoilers ahead from last night’s season premiere of The X-Files!

Remember two years ago when Fox brought back The X-Files for a six-episode run and left us on a cliffhanger that seemed to put Mulder on death’s door while the world fell to a deadly illness? Well, forget about it, because it was all a dream! Or maybe parts of it were a dream or some kind of vision of the future? But if you thought fans were pissed about that, well, the firestorm is just getting started. Today’s Nerdist News is diving into the Scully intel that changes everything we thought we knew about her son, William.

Join host and conspiracy crusher, Jessica Chobot, as she unpacks the loaded revelation that William is not the love child of Mulder and Scully. Instead, the Cigarette-Smoking Man secretly used science to impregnate Scully with alien DNA some time during the seventh season. Oh, and CSM may have used his own DNA as well. If so, that would make him William’s real father.



According to series creator Chris Carter, this was always the plan for Scully’s child, even if they never got around to dealing with it on the original series. So far, the response from fans has been less than positive. One of the more endearing parts of the previous season was the way that Mulder and Scully shared their grief over missing their son’s life. Now, that burden is Scully’s alone. And we’re thinking that this is one mystery that would have been better left out of the show.

What do you think about the paternity of Scully’s son and the season 10 cliffhanger? Declassify your thoughts in the comment section below!




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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Thu 4 Jan - 17:36



[TV Review] ‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Premiere: “My Struggle III”

   by Daniel Kurland
   January 3, 2018

“The X-Files” returns to pick up the pieces from last year’s finale, but it only creates a sloppier mess that undermines its audience. But hang in there.

   “Scully and her child have a bond beyond you; beyond science.”

The X-Files’ 11th season comes in at an uphill battle. Last year’s 10th season return might have been a decent enough revival of the series, but it in many ways felt like a trial run or practice for this season. It’s safe to say that many ­X-Files fans were ecstatic over the announcement of the show’s return last year, but the end product burned a lot of this goodwill. I’m a tremendous X-Files fans and one of the largest apologists over seasons eight and nine, but last season was largely a misfire, with a lot of this blame falling squarely on the series’ creator, Chris Carter. Carter gets credit for bringing back much of the show’s core team for its return, but Carter’s episodes are far and away the worst of the truncated season ten. In fact, “My Struggle II” is certainly one of the worst X-Files episodes of all time and a severe failure on all fronts. It’s an enraging piece of television that carelessly eliminates most of the Earth’s population in a very manipulative fashion. It’s very easy to watch that finale and then never have any interest in more X-Files ever again. It’s a dangerous, damaging conclusion to the series. “My Struggle III” is even worse.

The X-Files made a lot of waves for their transparency regarding their season 11 plans. Not only would the season have a larger episode order, but it would also shift the mythology back to Mulder and Scully’s child, William. That all sounds promising in theory, but the premiere faces the lofty task of not only kicking this season off on the right foot, but to also correct the many mistakes of “My Struggle II.” I was so, so ready to give Chris Carter the benefit of the doubt here. I was genuinely hopeful that he might be able to turn things around, but “My Struggle III” is a pretty colossal slap in the face to both the fans that are new to the show’s “return” and those that have been around since its start in the ’90s. But hey, at least the phrase “alien DNA” comes up a whole lot less.

The first thing to address here is how the show can possibly answer to the outrageous decisions that it makes in “My Struggle II,” which include Mulder waiting at death’s door. Carter’s solution here is to simply say that it never even happened in the first place. All of that nonsense in season ten’s finale is actually just a vision that Scully experiences while she has a seizure! I truly don’t know what to make of that rationale, but it’s the most absurd sort of backpedaling that’s even worse than the whole “it was all a dream” angle. There was literally no way the show could return from the colossal events of “My Struggle II.” Carter had another series called Millennium that orchestrates a viral apocalypse that Carter cops out on by simply reducing the too-high number of casualties. That’s insulting, but it’s still better than this. What’s worse is that the whole thing puts Scully in another situation of helplessness, whereas she was at least the force of action in her hopeless seizure-narrative.

Furthermore, Scully’s brain activity plays Morse Code with Mulder and Skinner and tells them to find William? Excuse me? Is that kind of thing even possible and if it were, how would Scully know how to activate portions of her brain in this way? It’s pretty ridiculous, whether it’s accurate or not, but it points the show back in the same direction that the false narrative of “My Struggle II” ends on, which is to find Mulder and Scully’s lost child. What’s also strange here is that Skinner has to be the voice of reason while Mulder is deeply skeptical and hesitant to try to locate their offspring. It feels like a manufactured obstacle because as difficult as giving away William was, Mulder would be all for this idea, especially since Scully’s health is its main concern! Once more, Carter seems to prove that his judgment towards these characters is lapsing and no one seems to be able to stop him since this is his show after all. All of his worst habits are on display here, including Mulder’s stilted purple prose over many minutes of him simply driving his car. I’m sorry because this might be nitpicking, but just examine a piece of Mulder’s non-stop monologues:

“I was running only on adrenaline and Scully’s premonitions, but was it hope I should be feeling, or fear that Scully’s right and that a man that I had come to despise, my own father, was alive? And if he were, he had become mad with power.”

And it’s all like this. At one point in this premiere the Cigarette Smoking Man tells Reyes, “I’m just cleaning up the mess that they made,” and it feels eerily appropriate here, yet this episode doesn’t really clean up much at all.

Things take another turn for the worse when Scully comes out of her coma and explains that her vision is actual a glimpse of the future. This means that all the missteps in “My Struggle II” are actually the roadmap for this season’s mythology episodes. However, now Scully knows what to do and can hopefully prevent the apocalypse, but this all comes to pass because Scully is suddenly clairvoyant for absolutely no reason at all. It’s maddening. Some sloppy excuse tries to be used in an attempt to justify this, but it still doesn’t make a lot of sense. Scully’s condition gets even worse when her debilitating seizures also appear to psychically link her to William. It’s a whole lot more flash with little substance as Scully gets to scream and be the victim. These two conflate into the same thing and it’s revealed that William is sending her these visions of the future to warn them. This ends up being a somewhat decent answer, but it has to jump through so many horrible hoops to reach this point.

It cannot be stressed enough how terrible the treatment of Scully is in this episode. She is continually ignored and treated like garbage, only to arise from one coma and end up in another life-threatening situation when she has another seizure while she’s driving. Then someone tries to suffocate her with a pillow until Mulder is able to step in and save her life. It’s brutal to the point of being sadistic and I genuinely don’t understand it. Is Carter bitter about the ways in which Gillian Anderson has (rightfully) criticized the show about its lack of diversity and is just taking it out on her here?

If “My Struggle” is about Mulder’s struggle and “My Struggle II” is about Scully’s struggle, then “My Struggle III” is about the Cigarette Smoking Man’s struggle. This once more should be a strong idea in theory, but the struggle of Carl Gerhard Bush (yes, that’s the Cigarette Smoking Man’s true name and what the CGB in CGB Spender stands for) is rather disappointing. There are still plenty of heightened moments like the reveal that Cigarette Smoking Man is responsible for events like the faking of the moon landing, which might feel a little gratuitous, but the show has gone to much crazier places. These cute little winks at conspiracies throughout history being a result of CSM’s agenda almost play like the episode’s highlights due to the bonkers decisions that are made elsewhere.

Monica Reyes continues to be BFFs with the Cigarette Smoking Man for no real reason other than to frustrate the audience. Yes, last season she explained that she plans to take down the Syndicate from within, but until that happens (and if it happens), she’s going to great lengths to be the worst here. Where’s Doggett when you need him?

It’s fine if the Cigarette Smoking Man needs some kind of younger lackey, but why is it Reyes of all people? There are all sorts of other characters that would nicely fit in this role. Reyes also insinuates that Cigarette Smoking Man is in love with Scully and acts almost like she’s jealous that he doesn’t think of her the same way. What?

This behavior actually connects back to an episode from 17 years ago, season seven’s “En Ami,” where Scully goes on a road trip with Smoking Man since he tells her he has the cure for the cancer. During their “adventure” together, at one point Scully becomes suspicious over a situation where she thinks the Cigarette Smoking Man has drugged her, changed her clothes, and placed her in a bed. Carter retcons CSM’s explanation in the most horrible way possible and turns “En Ami” into a hell of a creepier episode. Apparently CSM “impregnated Scully with science” after he drugged her so he’s able to create this “super child” in the first place. So in case it’s unclear, Mulder is not William’s father and it’s actually some weird lovechild that CSM generated between himself and Scully.

William is Smoking Man’s kid and what the fucking fuck!?

It’s one final way to knock Scully down and it becomes even more offensive in response to everything that’s been coming to light post-Weinstein’s downfall. I can’t imagine any fans liking this development, so why even go there? To make audiences hate the Cigarette Smoking Man even more and believe that he’s truly evil? The audience already feels that way without Scully needing to get raped in the process. “En Ami” was also written by William B. Davis and I’m extremely curious of his take on this pivot to what Carter retroactively does to his episode (or if this somehow was his original intent, too).

It’s interesting to note that the credit’s typical “Truth Is Out There” title card says, “I Want to Believe,” but then pointedly follows it with, “I Want To Lie.” Mulder and company are so disillusioned from what they used to believe that the thought of some false alternative is deeply appealing. It’s no coincidence that the show’s cold open features a number of images of Trump and lumps him in with the Cigarette Smoking Man’s diatribe. The idea of believing in a fantasy because real life is just too upsetting and insane is a feeling that many people have been feeling over the past year and The X-Files continues to try to pull from the current times—for both better and worse—with its narrative. The last season did this to a large degree too, but it didn’t have Trump to wrap into its conspiracies.

On that note, Mulder comes up against some new Syndicate goons (Mr. Y and Barbara Hershey’s Erika Price) that actually want him to take down CSM because they don’t agree with his human genocide plan. They explain that they still want to protect the planet, which were the original intentions of the Syndicate. There’s a flashback here that helps fill in a few details and shows the Syndicate making their original deal with the aliens. Price and Mr. Y want to stop Smoking Man from bringing forth “The Fourth Turning” as he culls the herd of the planet and builds a new group with immunity. Their plan instead looks at the colonization of space—something that’s apparently not far off—with them still executing the same plan of culling a select few to start over off of Earth.

Curiously, CSM and Reyes try to recruit Skinner to join their cause and help them find William. The concept behind Mulder and Skinner both needing to make unlikely alliances to achieve the greater good isn’t bad in theory, but “My Struggle III” doesn’t do the proper legwork when it comes to Skinner’s business. Not to mention, this whole approach where dangerous people are on the hunt for William is essentially the same story engine from the show’s eighth season. Skinner and Mulder are both skeptical to their directives. They both point out the absurdity of these plotlines, but it doesn’t change the fact that these are still the directions that this season chooses to bank on.

Furthermore, why would Skinner agree to Smoking Man’s plan!? So Skinner’s someone that’s not to be trusted this season, too? There’s no explanation for anyone’s actions in this episode! And “You smell like smoke!”? Come on! What sort of emotional explosion is that?

There are other moments in this premiere that hint at something exciting, but only manage to muddle the situation. For instance, I’m all for bringing Jeffrey Spender back into the fold. I’ve always been a fan of the character and Chris Owens’ performance, but it doesn’t exactly make a lot of sense. Additionally, Agents Miller and Einstein of “X-Files: The Next Generation” get an obligatory cameo that’s more contrived than necessary. They conveniently are present to help save Scully’s life and then exit immediately afterwards.

This seriously might be the worst, most insulting mythology episode that the series has ever done. This is not an encouraging return to this universe and it would be all too easy for someone to check out this premiere, write off the entire season as trash, and not tune in again. I’ve been extremely hard on this episode, but don’t do that.
As someone that’s seen the first five episodes of this season, understand that this episode is not at all representative of the season’s quality. There are some incredible, inspired monster of the week episodes that lie ahead, with one even by Chris Carter, no less. It’s just crazy that during this show’s prime, some viewers would only tune in for the mythology installments and write off the others. Now it’s the complete reverse. The mythos entries are the ones that need to be avoided (at least so far) and it’s the random episodes that effectively illustrate where the show’s magic and strength still lies.

Don’t worry though guys, as Mulder’s voiceover tells us, “a drum beats in his heart” so everything’s obviously going to be just fine.

“The X-Files’” 11th season will continue Wednesdays at 9pm (ET) on FOX.






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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Fri 5 Jan - 3:58

THE X-FILES Review: “My Struggle III”

January 4, 2018



Often I think I’ve seen the worst of the worst when it comes to television shows. Then a wonderful series like The X-Files is defiled with the pure idiocy that is “My Struggle III.” It’s not just that this episode is bad, makes no sense, has no causation or narrative structure, and retcons the X-Files mythos in offensively misogynistic ways. All of that would be bad enough. What makes this truly egregious is that it is

X-Files and hence could be great and should be great with even the most minimal effort. Instead we get lazy hack nonsense that my thirteen-year-old fanfiction fever dreams put to shame. I legitimately can’t fathom why these actors keep signing on for this nonsense. There is literally nothing in this episode that is good or even neutral. The whole thing is bad. The “plot” is bad; the structure is bad; the characterizations are bad; the dialogue is bad; the twist is actively disgusting, especially in our current climate of exposing the sexual harassment that women in every industry face every day simply by trying to exist. I want to ask the heavens who thought this was a good idea but it’s definitely Chris Carter who thought this was a good idea. Fun story! Carter, responsible for creating one of the most iconic science fiction texts in pop culture history, actually does not like and knows nothing about science fiction. He heard a Hollywood nutjob telling a story about government conspiracies and aliens at a party in the early ‘90s and thought it would make a great TV show. I feel like the longer this goes on the more he exposes how dumb he is about sci-fi and how actively misogynistic he is. It’s easy to forgive X-Files a lot of its weird treatment of women because the bulk of it was a mainstream ‘90s series. The treatment of women has gotten worse as the world has become more cognizant of problems with gendered representation which means newer X-Files has already aged worse than the originals.



As with the previous season, this show’s mytharc doesn’t seem to understand that the cultural context of conspiracy theories has changed dramatically since this show’s inception. Conspiracy theories used to be an expression of distrust in the military industrial complex. They were the liberal expression of individuality and the power of the people. If just-plain-folks can uncover the big shady plans of the government then just-plain-folks can take back power. Conspiracy theories used to be weird hippie-dippy nonsense. Now they are an ultra-politicized arm of the fascist propaganda machine of the right-wing. You can’t just keep using conspiracies in this story in the same way because they mean something completely different now. In addition, the sudden inclusion of terms like “fake news” and clips of Trump, Putin, and various other dictators and right wing media figures is jarring and absurd considering that the previous season of this show ran in early 2016 and presumably no time has passed narratively between now and then. The world is changing too fast around X-Files and it’s too slow and stodgy to keep up. What was once a cutting-edge progressive show is now backwards and painful.

Not only is X-Files now hopelessly out of touch with politics and the zeitgeist but this episode is also actually stupid. Characters make enormous leaps in their logic and presumptions which read as an attempt to create urgency and increase the pace without the writers actually doing any intellectual work. The neurologist immediately decides that Scully’s visions are some kind of messages put in her head by the government, which would be all right in the context of this show except she pulls it out of thin air like that’s a common cause your average neurologist would presume. Somehow Scully’s brain is flashing Morse code messages in the CT scan which would probably actually just kill you. Somehow Scully is “impregnated” years before she actually became pregnant, and a whole host of other things. Literally nothing in this episode makes sense or logically follows. Even the fact that Scully is having seizures at all is hysterical. It’s like they heard the complaints about the previous season ending on a very stupid world-ending cliffhanger and tried to walk it back. It’s possibly the first time this show has realized that it’s painted itself into a corner but sudden magical seizures in the main female character who is having them solely because of her magical son is just the limit. They’ve tried to martyr Strong Female Archetype Scully for the sake of humanity. Now that I think about it, it’s in the classic fan fiction hurt/comfort genre. Scully is super-sick, only her sickness can save the world, and only Mulder can save her. The thing is, even the worst of the old usenet melodramas had more coherent plots than this. They had to or they’d get ripped apart by readers.



Thankfully, there are ten episodes this season and I’m given to believe that the next eight are standalone Monster of the Week episodes. The mytharc in this series died like literally 20 years ago so I wish they’d just stop even pretending anyone cares about this part of this story. It’s impossible to fix at this point so just stop. Give me monsters and shut up about conspiracies.



Season 11, Episode 1 (S11E01)
The X-Files airs on FOX on Wednesdays at 8PM



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Re: 11x01 - My Struggle III

Post by jade1013 on Fri 5 Jan - 4:11

TV REVIEW: ‘The X-Files’ – ‘My Struggle III’

'The truth still lies in the X-Files'

Hunter Heilman | January 4, 2018

WARNING: Spoilers for “The X-Files” ahead.


Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) awaking from one of her visions. Photo courtesy of Robert Falconer/FOX.

I’ll be honest, I hated the finale to the last season of “The X-Files,” for what was a decent season overall. My biggest fear after the finale of the mini-series that was season 10 of the iconic show was that we were to leave one of the greatest shows of all time on a horrendously plotted cliffhanger that did no one any favors whatsoever. And with that, my first thought when I think of Season 10 of “The X-Files” is of its horrid low with its ending, not it’s sometimes great highs, with episodes like “Mulder and Scully Meet the Were-Monster” that hit so well into our nostalgia bones. The plain and simple truth of the matter is that “The X-Files” is a show much more enjoyable when actually dealing with individual cases within the X-Files, not the grand mythology that creator Chris Carter always wants to shove at us. The “Monster-of-the-Week” episodes are the iconic ones that I remember as a fan of “The X-Files,” and that’s all I really ask for in Season 11 is more of them, and less convoluted mythology episodes.

Too bad “My Struggle III” is one of the dreaded mythology episodes. Though, it’s not as poor as it could’ve been.

Starting off with a monologue from the Cigarette Smoking Man [CSM] (William B. Davis) about the state of the world we live in and the secrets he holds within him, “The X-Files” catches us up to speed with the world since we last left the show nearly two years ago. It does a decent job in stating how far the world has come since the events of “My Struggle II” (even though the episode picks up immediately where the last one left off, nearly two years earlier).


Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully reuniting after her seizure that put her into a coma. Photo courtesy of Robert Falconer/FOX.

After the opening credits, we finally learn what happened to Agent Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) after she looked directly into the light of the alien spacecraft on the 14th Street Bridge at the end of last season. We learn that Scully suffered a seizure and that the events of “My Struggle II” were all a vision from Scully of what could happen in the future. While I really hate the idea of the “It was all a dream!” trope, and while it does seem like a cop-out here, I have no issue wiping “My Struggle II” from the slate and starting over. As it was so clumsily written that I’ll accept a re-write, even if it also comes in a clumsy manner.

After an MRI shows Scully to be emitting a morse code signal saying “Find him,” Fox Mulder (David Duchovny) knows she is talking about William, their missing son, that seems to be the key to everything surrounding the mythology these past two seasons. When Scully awakes, she tells Mulder of her visions, and warns him that Mulder will die without seeking out the CSM and ending it once and for all, preventing the spread of the spread of the fatal pathogen.

Later, Scully is visited by Jeffrey Spender (Chris Owens), Mulder’s brother, whom they entrusted William with in the original series. He tells them that he’s being followed by someone who wants William and came to warn her. When Scully asks Spender to reveal William’s location, he refuses to break his promise he made her to never tell anyone of William’s location. Though, after pleading, he says he can reveal who the adoptive parents are, yet is interrupted by hospital staff before he can.


Scully having suffered yet another seizure from her visions after leaving the hospital. Photo courtesy of Sergei Bashlakov/FOX

Next, we return to the CSM with Monica Reyes (Annabeth Gish), revealed to be in alliance with him last season. They begin speaking of Mulder and Scully’s plans, to which Reyes implies that they might realize William to be the weakness in CSM’s armor. Here, we get an update to our world when CSM states that however airtight his plans of human extinction might be, they would simply be dismissed as “fake news” in our day and age. Scandal over substance, etc.

At this point in the episode, I’m pleased with how they turned around the sins of “My Struggle II,” but I myself and struggling to keep up with everything going on at once and why it’s particularly important. After 11 seasons, there’s only so much “The X-Files” can do with its mythology before it becomes batshit crazy, and not even the good kind of batshit. It’s already convoluted, but it always finds a way to redeem itself, which it seems to be doing at the exact same time as it’s pressing more into its convoluted nature.

This being said, the episode does pick up a bit from here and while I can’t ever say that it does anything spectacular, it’s enough to keep me interested in this season.


Mulder approaching the house of the Cigarette Smoking Man (William B. Davis) Photo courtesy of Robert Falconer/FOX

As Mulder makes his way down to the CSM, he soon finds upon arrival that he has left his home and members of the Syndicate, a group nearly wiped out in the original series, are in his place, propositioning Mulder to kill CSM on their behalf, to continue in their plan of alien colonization. When the group explains their intention is to throw CSM off, rather than playing the obvious move of killing him themselves, Mulder sees through it as a way for them to implement their own plan of alien colonization without risk of failure. Mulder storms out of the proposition refuting the idea that he can save them, but that he knows someone who could, and that they know her too.

It sounds like a clusterfuck, and it kind of is, but there’s a sort of playfulness to the second half of the episode that I like about it. It’s silly and out there in the way that “The X-Files” should be. Is it perfect? No, but there’s enough fun here to go around.

All the while, Walter Skinner (Mitch Pileggi) has been cornered in a parking garage by Reyes and CSM, who begin to explain their plan of human cleansing. He explains his plan excludes Scully and William, as they are immune to such a disease, and he attempts to bring Skinner to his side to lure more allies away from the X-Files and into his pocket. Here, we get to see a more fiery Skinner that we got in the original series, hardlining his stance against CSM in a way we didn’t get in Season 10.

Scully, having exited the hospital and behind the wheel of a car, suffers another vision and involves herself in a car accident, landing herself back in the hospital when Agents Einstein (Lauren Ambrose) and Miller (Robbie Amell) find her after her accident. Later that night, Scully is visited in her room by a member of the Syndicate, who wastes no time in attempting to smother her in her sleep, only to be thwarted by Mulder, who has traveled back from South Carolina in record time somehow, slitting the assailant’s throat.


Mulder confronting Walter Skinner (Mitch Pileggi) about his whereabouts after Scully’s attack. Photo courtesy of Robert Falconer/FOX

Recovering from the attack, Mulder and Scully share a tender moment, which leads into the one thing I wanted from this episode: a lead in to more “Monster-of-the-Week” episodes, saying that until they can find William and CSM, all they can do is their work, and that even outside of their search, the “truth still lies in the X-Files.” Damn right it does. This is the content I signed up for. I might not have gotten it in this episode, but dammit it’s coming.

Skinner soon walks in after his confrontation with CSM, Mulder questions him on his whereabouts, telling him he smells like smoke, leading to a confrontation that in turn leads to a flashback to the car, where CSM reveals to Skinner that Mulder is not William’s father, but he is. That 17 years prior in episode “En Ami,” when Scully was drugged by CSM, he in turn, whether by force or science, impregnated Scully.

This twist goes two ways for me, on one hand, it’s a good way to shake up the series in a way that I didn’t see coming. On the other hand, it’s scummy and disturbing. Granted, we aren’t supposed to think anything less of CSM, but it certainly does give him an extra layer of grossness we never got before. The fact that Scully gave birth to Mulder’s half-brother all this time is a disturbing revelation, but one that I’m interested to see how it unfolds going forward. It took 41 minutes to get to the real dark meat of the episode, but it came.

“My Struggle III” was a mixed bag for me to say the least. It has good elements about it, but even in damage control mode, it’s still a mess that makes me like the mythology episodes even less than I already do. I’m absolutely stoked for the upcoming “Monster-of-the-Week” episodes, and this season premiere is the obvious hurdle we had to cross to get to such episodes. I commend Carter for correcting his awful mistake with “My Struggle II,” but I need him to lean in more to really flesh out what he wants “The X-Files” to be in what appears to be its final season. Until then, bring us the monsters dammit.

My Struggle III: 3/5


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