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11x03 - Plus One

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11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Mon 18 Sep - 4:44








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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Fri 15 Dec - 15:02

Episode 3, “Plus One,” follows “a spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgangers, lead Mulder and Scully to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game. Guest-starring Karin Konoval (Season Four’s “Home”).” The episode was written by Chris Carter. New to The X-Files for this episode is director Kevin Hooks, whose recent directing credits include Nat Geo’s Genius, Marvel’s The Punisher, and Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Tue 2 Jan - 15:20

The X-Files - Episode 11.03 - Plus One - Promotional Photos & Press Release

Posted by SpoilerTV at January 02, 2018



MULDER AND SCULLY ARE SEEING DOUBLE ON AN ALL-NEW "THE X-FILES" WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, ON FOX

Episode Written by Chris Carter and Directed by Kevin Hooks; Karin Konoval Guest-Stars

A spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgangers, lead Mulder and Scully to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game in the all-new "Plus One" episode of THE X-FILES airing Wednesday, Jan. 17 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. (XF-1103) (TV-14 D, L, S, V)

Cast: David Duchovny as Fox Mulder; Gillian Anderson as Dana Scully; Mitch Pileggi as Walter Skinner

Guest Cast: Karin Konoval as Little Judy Poundstone and Little Chucky Poundstone, Benjamin Wilkinson as Dean Cavalier, Jared Ager-Foster as Arkie Seavers, Lossen Chambers as Nurse Peggy Easton, Alison Araya as Nurse Vickie Easton, Denise Dowse as Dr. Babsi Russel

Source: FOX



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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Tue 2 Jan - 20:04

"Plus One" Promotional Photos

   By Roi Ollson & Keva Andersen
   On January 02, 2018



Chris Carter's second episode of Season 11 is "Plus One", and it's sure to get fans excited. Take a look at the photos below to see what Chris has in store for us.

A spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgängers, lead Mulder and Scully to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game. This episode guest stars Karin Konoval and is written by Chris Carter. Kevin Hooks directs.



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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 11 Jan - 5:00




The X-Files 11x03 Promo "Plus One" (HD)

TV Promos
Publicado em 10 de jan de 2018

The X-Files 11x03 "Plus One" Season 11 Episode 3 Promo - A spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgangers, lead Mulder and Scully to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game in the all-new “Plus One” episode of THE X-FILES airing Wednesday, January 17th on FOX. Subscribe to tvpromosdb on Youtube for more The X-Files season 11 promos in HD!

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Tue 16 Jan - 4:20

‘The X-Files’ Season 11, Episode 3: Mulder, Scully Investigate Deaths Involving Doppelgangers

By Christian Saclao On 01/15/18 AT 11:10 PM

Mulder and Scully investigate a string of unusual deaths in this week’s episode of “The X-Files.”

According to the synopsis for Season 11, episode 3 of the Fox series, Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) look into a spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgangers.

In the trailer for the episode, Dr. Babsi Russel (Denise Dowse) confirms to Mulder and Scully that the victims “all saw their doubles” prior to their deaths. The promo clip also teases the final moments of two of the victims. One is seen about to be attacked by his double using a katana, while the other is seen hitting a tree with his car after his doppelganger suddenly shows up and takes the wheel from him.

Mulder and Scully’s investigation leads them to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game. In the trailer, one of the twins tells the partners that people can protect themselves from their doubles “telepathically.”




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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 6:44

The X-Files season 11 episode 3 live stream: Watch online

by Sarah Crocker
1 hour ago
Follow @superduperspock

Doppelgängers and possibly evil twins spell trouble for Mulder and Scully in the latest season 11 episode of The X-Files, “Plus One.”

This week, it looks like we’re getting back to the old “monster of the week” formula for The X-Files. At least, it’s hard to see how creepy doppelgängers and psychic twins will be tied to baddies like Erika Price or the Cigarette Smoking Man.

It also looks like we’ll encounter at least a few brief moments of gore. In the promo for “Plus One,” a man faces off with his evil twin, brandishing a katana. Stills from the episode show that the man meets a grisly but (hopefully) quick end. Plus, his carpet is totally ruined.



How are Mulder and Scully going to solve this one? With psychic phenomena in the mix, it’s always a tense situation for the pair. It doesn’t help that Scully is apparently having a hard time dealing with a possibly unstable reality. Or could it be that she has her own doppelgänger serving steely looks and potential murder?

Doppelgänger mysteries

Here’s the synopsis for “Plus One”, courtesy of TV Guide:

A spate of deaths, in which the victims were plagued by their own doppelgangers, lead Mulder and Scully to a pair of twins playing a dangerous game.

Who are these twins? One one hand, it could be that they are overtly malicious. However, given the history of psychic and doppelgänger-type episodes in The X-Files, they might also be misguided doofuses.
There are plenty of those to be found in Mulder and Scully’s wake when all is said and done. We’ll have to wait until “Plus One” airs to tell for sure.

Here is when and where you can watch “Plus One”:

Date: Wednesday, Jan. 17
Start time: 8 p.m. ET
Episode: “Plus One”
TV Channel: FOX
Live Stream: Stream 1 | Stream 2

Hopefully, Scully can maintain her sanity. In the best case scenario, we might even hope that she pairs up with her mystery twin for some Scully-squared investigating power. That’s probably far too silly for the tone of “Plus One,” but we can always hope. If nothing else, there’s bound to be some intriguing psychic phenomena on view.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 18:18

The X-Files Review: Mulder and Scully Finally Stop Fighting the Future

(Episode 11.03)

By Dom Sinacola  |  January 17, 2018  |  9:00pm

Photo: Shane Harvey/FOX



In “Plus One,” instead of offering her a beer, Mulder (David Duchovny) assures Scully (Gillian Anderson) that she’s still “got it going on,” that there is still “scoot in [her] boot.” In a small, modestly furnished hotel room, functionally and irrevocably alone except for each other, Mulder and Scully finally talk about what the future holds for them—what it means to have aged into a world that has seemingly left them behind, Mulder now 56 and Scully almost 54 (though arguably in better shape than they were 20 years ago, if the Hard Boiled gunfights and car chases of the previous two episodes mean anything). Scully asks Mulder to hold her; he quickly obliges and together they broach, for what appears to be the first time, what it might mean if they retire from the FBI, if they find romantic partners outside of their duo, if their work on the X-Files ultimately proves, after all these decades, to not have been worth that time.

Last week, Erik Adams wrote about Andrea Natella’s thisman.org as a way to interpret this season of The X-Files, and the ideas he presents are undeniable given my past criticisms. The egregious retconning, the mind-boggling lurches in tone, even the aforementioned, physics-defying gunkata: If this whole season is a dream “gifted” to Scully by her son, William—though I’m not sure why William would try to convince his mom that Cigarette Smoking Man is his real father—as a way for her to live out the rest of her life, in some sort of cerebral parallel dimension, with Mulder, doing their “work” and growing old together, then all the clues are there, in varying shades of obvious.

Perhaps all this subtextual exploration of the zeitgeist—especially the expectations and roles of an aging woman in both the professional and domestic spheres, as Scully first asks Mulder if he thinks of her as “old,” and, by extension, not desirable, and, by further extension, not fertile—feels like too much coming from the pen of Chris Carter, who wrote “Plus One” and is a guy who typically writes characters as if they’re agender Victorian poets. Still, the ongoing symbol of the double, of twins and alternate versions of oneself—like Computer Langley in “This,” or the entire plot of the season premiere—becomes impossible to avoid with “Plus One,” as Mulder and Scully investigate a rash of killings in which the victims seem to be defeated by their own doppelgängers. This means we’re party to a scene in which Mulder beats himself up, à la Jet Li’s The One (directed, it’s worth mentioning probably, by X-Files mainstay James Wong), as well as one of those standout guest performances this show always seems to nail, this time care of Karin Konoval playing twins Little Judy and Little Chucky Poundstone like they’re active members of Carnivale’s traveling 1930s sideshow. A sleazy lawyer type (Benjamin Wilkinson) cuts off his own head with a samurai sword, an auto-beheading on par with Noel Kahn falling neck-first on a medieval axe in the last season of Pretty Little Liars. In other words, “Plus One” was a pretty good episode.

Whether the season can exist, in the end, as an overarching conceptual piece will of course depend on how much one trusts Carter not to blow it, but regardless, the ideas this episode raises about the trajectory of The X-Files are exciting. At its most functional, “Plus One” transcends the long-abandoned “will they or won’t they” between Mulder and Scully (they will, twice in this episode) by examining the nuts and bolts of rebooting the show at all, questioning inevitability, expectation, fan service and change in the context of a foundational network drama that can no longer survive solely on that reputation. Should Mulder and Scully be together, or is their bond one born of tragedy and trauma, their reunion in Season 10 the unfortunate result of their shared existential loneliness reaching a terminus of sorts? Have the X-Files destroyed better lives they could have lived?

“Real” or not, Season 11 of The X-Files envisions Mulder and Scully constantly on the edge of whatever reality is supposed to be—between the lives they want and the lives they have, between belief and skepticism, between the limits of the physical body and the breadth of our imaginations. I still think Carter is gonna blow this, but in this liminal space is, I think, where I want this show to be, embracing the future rather than fighting it.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 18:23







youreadarkwizard:

From @thexfilesfox Instagram story, 01/17/18

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 19:12

January 17, 2018 9:00 pm

The X-Files Recap: The Hangman’s Curse

By Brian Tallerico



Plus One
Season 11  
Episode 3
Editor's Rating  4 stars  

Chris Carter returns to pen this week’s episode, “Plus One,” an hour that works mostly as a standalone thriller but is far more effective for anyone who has a history with Dana Scully and Fox Mulder. In a sense, this is the most old-fashioned X-Files episode since the reboot as it featured the two leads in their most common roles — Mulder the believer vs. Scully the skeptic — and it plays off their still-palpable romantic chemistry. It also brings back a character actor from the heyday of the show, a performer who starred in two of the most beloved episodes ever: “Home” and “Clyde Bruckman’s Final Repose.” And then Carter went a step further by giving her multiple roles.

The actress in question is Karin Konoval, who appears here as both Judy and Chucky Poundstone, telepathically connected twins who play a deadly game of Hangman. First, we meet one of our poor victims of the week: Arkie Seavers, a young man just having a good time at a concert when he sees his doppelgänger. He flees the concert, only to have his “other” grab the wheel and drive him into a tree. Bring on the X-Files!

Fox Mulder gets the Seavers case and discovers that a number of people have tried to kill themselves after claiming they saw someone who looked exactly like them. Is it the rare (and true) phenomenon known as a “suicide cluster,” or is it something more supernaturally sinister? Of course, Scully thinks Arkie is lying, but Mulder is more inclined to believe. And anyone who’s ever seen an X-Files knows that Arkie is doomed.

Before the young man dies, Mulder and Scully meet a patient with split personality disorder named Judy Poundstone. Her room is filled with games of hangman, which she claims she plays with her brother, Chucky, who lives across town. Mulder charms Judy a bit, and that charm may very well be the reason he survives the episode.

Mulder and Scully check into the St. Rachel Motel in a suite, but Mulder takes the couch. He comes to her in the middle of the night to reveal Arkie’s death, and the investigation sends him off to find the irascible Chucky. Unfortunately, he scenes between Mulder and Chucky are the ones that don’t quite work. They’re a bit too laden with Carter’s clunky dialogue and Konoval isn’t quite as believable in the second part of the dual role. There’s a goofiness that doesn’t quite click, even though both actors are clearly having a good time.

Better are the scenes between Judy and Scully, including the first one in which we meet “Demon Judy,” one of her evil alter egos who literally “flings dookie” at Scully. In what first seems like a throwaway line from the nurses, we learn that both of the Poundstone parents hung themselves — later we’ll see hangman drawings of “Mom” and “Dad,” implying that their kids did them in à la Arkie Seavers. Scully tries to get more information out of Judy, but is tormented by this new nemesis, and she takes that torment with her when Judy suggests that she’s over the hill and “all dried up.” As Judy says, “Nothing hurts like the truth.”

Back at the motel, Scully drops a pretty cool meta-reference to the role that you probably know Konoval best for, even if you didn’t realize it. Scully mentions that having “dookie” thrown at you makes you want to “gather the other apes and make war against your enemy.” Konoval played Maurice the Orangutan in all three of the recent Planet of the Apes films, including last year’s excellent War for the Planet of the Apes. This scene also includes a bit of thematic development when Scully and Mulder discuss the truth behind ghosts: Are they scientifically explainable phenomenon or visitors from the other side? We know on which side these characters fall, but it’s wonderful to see them slip back into a pattern of supernatural debate. Scully also expresses vulnerability by asking Mulder if she’s old. Of course not, he says. She’s still got some “scoot in her boot.” And Mulder tells her to “knock three times” if she needs him.

After a couple of scenes with Chucky and Judy, it’s time to kill the wonderfully-named Dean Cavalier, the attorney for the now-deceased Arkie Seavers. First, Dean sees his double and goes to tell our heroes. That leads to another conversation about evil and the devil as concepts instead of realities. There’s a thread in this episode about how much we believe in things that we know aren’t really true — like ghosts, the devil, or the magic pills that the nurses at Judy’s clinic take just in case they work. Scully herself still sleeps with her back to the door in case the devil comes in the night. We all have superstitions, even the most skeptical among us.

Dean winds up cutting off his own head, which is quite a feat, and any fan of The X-Files knows that the threat will eventually get to Mulder and Scully in the final act, but not before an excellent scene between Anderson and Duchovny in their hotel bed. Scully reveals that the case is getting under her skin, and she asks Mulder what will happen to them when they’re older. These two actors have such wonderful chemistry and an easy rapport, this scene feels like it easily could have come from the original series. It’s one of the best of the new season so far. There’s even a bit of that Chris Carter mouthpiece dialogue — about the President bringing down the FBI in a world that’s going to hell — buried in their emotionally-driven exchange. When people speak of the best TV duos in history, Mulder and Scully often make the list, and this scene once again shows us why.

And then, the action. Mulder sees his double in the bathroom and freaks out in an appropriate manner. (Although I’m not sure telling Scully to “put a dimmer on that afterglow” is quite appropriate.) As Mulder races to confront Chucky and Scully goes to stop Judy, we discover that the twins are fighting each other. They can’t decide which agent to hang, which makes for a weird twist if you really think about it. What if Mulder and Scully were just a little less sexy? Or perhaps this is Carter’s way of revealing how much he thinks of his leads and characters: Don’t worry Scully, you still got it, at least enough to interest a homicidal, telepathic twin.

In their disagreement, the twins basically “hang” each other, making for something of a lackluster ending to an episode that wrote itself into a corner. However, the epilogue is strong as Scully plays cool like she doesn’t need Mulder and then changes her mind, only to find him in the doorway already. He’s always the believer.

Other Notes

• “Plus One” is tightly-packed in terms of narrative and locations, which is a credit to director Kevin Hooks for moving it along so smoothly. He’s a veteran of quality TV with credits that include everything from St. Elsewhere to LOST.

• Karin Konoval played Madame Zelma in “Clyde Bruckman” and Mrs. Peacock in “Home.” She also appeared in two episodes of Millennium (“Weeds” and “Through a Glass Darkly”). It’s great to see her back in the fold for the revival.

• A note about last week’s recap. A reader pointed out that the Lone Gunmen died in “Jump the Shark” and not “The Truth,” to which the answer is only … of course they did! I was so focused on figuring out the tombstone Easter eggs that I must have confused their last appearance (they appear as ghosts in “The Truth”) with their demise. Sincere apologies to Langly.

• In season 11, The X-Files seems to be recognizing its own shelf life and mortality more than ever. All three episodes so far have played with the show’s own past, either through direct reference or even meta-casting, and it’s starting to feel like Carter knows this is really the final lap. (Anderson swears she won’t return for another season, and Carter said he won’t do it without her.) Let’s see if that keeps up and if he truly brings the saga of Mulder and Scully to a satisfying conclusion.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 19:23

The X-Files recap: 'Plus One'

Mulder and Scully face their doubles…and themselves

Kelly Connolly@_kellyQ
Posted on January 17, 2018 at 9:00pm EST


Shane Harvey/FOX

type: TV Show
genre: Drama, Mystery, Sci-fi
performer: Gillian Anderson, David Duchovny
author: Chris Carter
broadcaster: Fox
seasons: 11
Current Status: In Season
tvpgr: TV-14

We gave it a B

Tracking the story of Mulder and Scully is like studying pointillism, like the scene in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off when Cameron Frye has a crisis of identity in front of a Seurat. Every episode of The X-Files is its own self-contained dot, consistent within itself but completely distinct — and often wildly different — from the dot next to it: tragedy followed by adventure followed by horror followed by farce.

This is usually a strength, and not just in a something-for-everyone sense. If you step far enough back, Mulder and Scully are made vibrant by how many contradictions they’re capable of holding. In his recent exploration of just what is going on between these two, my colleague Darren Franich cited the haziness of their relationship timeline as part of the pair’s “strange, paradoxical power”; leading up to this season, the show’s tonal elasticity was one of series creator Chris Carter’s favorite talking points. At its best, The X-Files is a reminder that we are elastic people.

But that doesn’t make those little dots of paint any less confusing in close-up, especially when one of them is trying to be pivotal but comes after the dot it feels like it’s pivoting toward. (I’m done with this analogy now.) Last week, Mulder and Scully were comfortably cohabitating and ribbing each other about handcuffs. This week, Scully makes a show about sharing a motel room. In an episode about doppelgängers, it’s tempting to think of this Mulder and Scully as slightly parallel to the ones we saw last week, or the ones we’ll see next week. The Mulder and Scully who talk about their future in “Plus One” are not their dark doubles, but that doesn’t mean they’ve never steered themselves into a tree.

We open on concertgoer Arkie Seavers crowd-surfing to a punk rock rendition of a David Duchovny song (!) when he spots his menacing double in the crowd and speeds off in his truck. His double appears in the passenger seat and grabs the wheel, sending the truck careening into a tree, and though Arkie flies through the windshield, he survives. As it turns out, Arkie isn’t the only local to be beset by visions of a doppelgänger, but he is the only one on record who’s still alive, so Mulder and Scully pay him a visit. His very enthusiastic lawyer insists that despite Arkie’s history of DUIs, alcohol isn’t the only force at work here.

Issues of blame get even more muddled when Scully and Mulder visit a doctor at the psychiatric hospital who treated multiple patients, all of whom are now dead, who claimed to see their doubles. The doctor says none of those patients had previously been treated for psychiatric problems — though, she adds, they weren’t exactly “upstanding citizens” either. For some reason, it’s the medical professionals in this episode who do the most work to reinforce negative and statistically false stereotypes of mental illness. On The X-Files, science has become a dark doppelgänger of itself.

While at the hospital, Mulder and Scully stumble upon a patient whose walls are lined with games of hangman, which is symbolic and therefore worth checking out. (Toward the end of the hour, Mulder will yell, “You’re under arrest! Put the pencil down!” On The X-Files, the paranormal has become an MFA class.) Naturally, one of those stick men hangs from a gallows that bears Arkie’s name. It was drawn by a woman with schizophrenia named Judy who claims to play hangman telepathically with her twin brother Chucky. Both characters are played by Karin Konoval, already infamous in the world of this show as Mrs. Peacock, the incestuous amputee mother kept under a bed in season 4’s “Home.” The X-Files is no stranger to reusing Vancouver-based actors, but in this story Konoval’s return plays into the idea that there’s nothing under the sun Mulder and Scully haven’t already faced, including themselves. It all comes back around.

Take the motel. In an encounter that would have made a lot more sense in the early years of this show — but hey, isn’t this why they broke up? For the fun tropes? — Mulder and Scully get to a local motel to find that there’s only one room at the inn. Mulder takes the room without a second thought; Scully looks amused that he would dare, which would have made sense before last week’s domesticity but feels pretty rich now. She banishes Mulder to a pull-out couch that is inexplicably behind a closed door, just to combine the tension of sharing a suite with the excitement of adjoining rooms.

(Of note: Mulder and Scully get to the motel at 11:21 p.m., a recurring motif since Mulder called Scully at the end of the pilot. The name of the establishment? St. Rachel Motel — as in, the Old Testament Matriarch whose greatest struggle was infertility until she was rewarded for her faith in the form of two sons, one of whom is best remembered for his amazing technicolor coat, the other of whom killed her in childbirth. Before Rachel married Jacob, her father tricked him into marrying her sister Leah first. Appearances can be deceiving, even, apparently, in bed.) (Next: Panic! At the motel)

Scully is barely asleep before Mulder pops up at the side of her bed in a disorienting jump scare — for a second, before he spoke, I wondered if he might not be himself — to tell her that Arkie was found hanged in his cell. The trustee who found him is Judy’s brother Chucky, a crude caricature of masculinity who asks Mulder if he’s “tapping” that “tasty little redhead” he works with. If Chucky’s lewdness is meant to overcompensate for the fact that he’s being played by a woman, it’s not necessary. Konoval is too talented to need cheap tricks. But the script still seems too amused by her role for its own good; Mulder will later describe Chucky as the “queerest little man,” playing on the double meaning of an adjective not everyone in the LGBTQ community has reclaimed all for the sake of an ain’t-we-clever wink at the fact that he’s played by a woman.

Most of Mulder and Scully’s encounters with the twins are stagnant in the plot department; they’re just torture by way of pop psychology, like a less entertaining version of the season 6 Christmas episode in which Ghost Ed Asner and Ghost Lily Tomlin tried to psychoanalyze the partners to push them into a murder-suicide pact. (It all comes back around.) Even when something finally happens in the case — Arkie’s lawyer, Dean, starts seeing his double — Mulder and Scully mostly take it as an opportunity to encourage Dean to search his feelings. “Just know that it can’t haunt you if you don’t let it,” Scully advises sagely.

Rather than listen, Dean goes home and dumps all of his guns and ammo in his driveway. (In the words of Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s Jake Peralta: Cool cool cool, our country is broken.) He’s midway through gathering up all of the ties that could possibly strangle him when he remembers that he’s the type of guy who collects samurai swords, and nothing good can ever come of a white man in a suit owning that many samurai swords. Dean is done in by his very dramatic, sword-wielding double (I laughed at his pose; I’m not sure I was supposed to), but there’s an element of his death that feels self-inflicted, if for no other reason than the fact that no one needs that many swords. To a certain extent, Dean hanged himself, as Arkie did when he got behind the wheel as a repeat DUI offender. Neither man is entirely responsible for his death, but neither man is innocent either.

This is Mulder and Scully’s big debate of the hour — is evil an idea inside us or a literal entity outside us? — and it seems the answer is “both.” Scully is having a hard time shaking off this case, maybe because the superstitions it taps into are especially Catholic: “I have to admit I still sleep with my back to the door just in case the Devil comes in the night.” She comes to Mulder in the night (the devil at his back, just as he’s already been the devil at hers twice) and asks him to hold her. She’s in a motel named after a woman whose husband got in bed with someone he thought was her but wasn’t. The signs are all there.

And yet she’s definitely Scully, and he’s definitely Mulder; their dark doubles don’t even speak. All the signs to the contrary play as a kind of challenge: Can we, like Scully, keep our fears at bay and trust who these characters are? Scully’s already seen her double once by now, but she’s convinced she’ll be fine if she just stays calm. Paranoia-as-X-File is not new territory for this show, and Scully’s ability to rise above it is characteristically what saves them both (in season 7’s “X-Cops,” a creature that masqueraded as its victims’ worst fears couldn’t touch her). “We can only hang ourselves if we panic,” she tells Mulder.

But Mulder and Scully can hang themselves in other ways. While spooning, Scully asks Mulder if they’ll still spend time together after they retire; he jokes about pushing her wheelchair with his. That’s not what she means. Mulder tries again: “I’ll always be around, Scully, offering bulletproof theories of genius that you fail to assail with your inadequate rationality.” That’s not what she means either. They’re talking around their issues again. It’s hard to make sense of the idea that either one of them could pretend at this point that they don’t know how to be together outside the office — they only just returned to the FBI after going on the run and then living together for over a decade. But what’s refreshing is that Scully recognizes their avoidance and refuses to let them keep talking in circles. (On her own, she protects herself by avoiding her fears; with Mulder she confronts them.) (Next: It rains sleeping bags)

The conversation gets more muddled. Judy pushed Scully’s buttons the last time she visited, taunting, “Past your childbearing years. You’re all dried up. Not even half a woman.” Every woman’s worst fear, you see, like Rachel, is to be old and childless. It’s a stereotype that diminishes Scully’s sense of her own worth, and even if it is in line with how much she fought to have kids in the original series, this feels like a discussion Mulder and Scully are only having now because they weren’t on our screens 15 years ago. The question of whether she — or he  — might want more kids is one they both would have dealt with before they reached their 50s. They’re talking around the real issue again, the one it would be more interesting to see them tackle head on: Scully’s struggle to accept that her decision to give up William took away Mulder’s one shot at being a father.

Instead, Mulder clings to the idea that there might be a double of a one-time opportunity (never mind that all doubles in this episode are dark; never mind that giving birth a second time killed Rachel). He asks Scully what’s stopping her from trying for more children. “Besides the fact that the first time was a miracle?” she asks, leaving out the daughter she had before William, Emily — the little girl born from the eggs that were harvested during Scully’s abduction, whom Scully met and lost one very sad Christmas in season 5. “And besides the fact that I don’t have anyone to have one with even if I could?” Scully continues, like she didn’t live with Mulder all those years. This is what Mulder complained about last week: rewriting history to make them both feel better about decisions they made long ago. This is pointillism again, and I’ve gotten too close.

And for all of the haziness of the timeline, the scene is still a standout at its most human level, especially when Mulder and Scully stop talking about the ways they’ve hanged themselves and start talking about those dark outside forces. “Sometimes I think the world is going to hell,” Scully says, “and we’re the only two people who can save it.” That sums them up. As The X-Files does at its best, Scully boils down the current political state to the most personal level: “What if we lose our jobs?” And then she turns to Mulder and promises they’ll think of something, and even her doppelgänger watching in the corner can’t spoil what obviously happens next: the closest this show has ever come to not talking in circles around Mulder and Scully in bed. Finally.

But Mulder isn’t as good at being logical about his paranoia as Scully is. He spots his double in the bathroom mirror and panics, ignoring Scully’s attempts to calm him down. (It’s 2018 and Scully is under a sheet asking Mulder to come back to bed.) “Put a dimmer on that afterglow, Scully,” he tells her — a great line — before speeding off to Chucky’s house. As for Scully, she heads to the hospital to confront Judy, stopping first to pop one of the bread pills Judy claimed to take for protection. Even given how much this case has gotten under Scully’s skin, it’s a stretch to think she’d go that far. I prefer her next reaction: spotting her double in the back seat and looking casually inconvenienced, like she did in her apocalyptic dream when she drove on the sidewalk and other people dared to be there.

Mulder fights his double at Chucky’s house in a dizzying brawl that feels like trying to keep track of a ball under a series of cups. But the fight that matters is happening between the siblings, who’ve gone from arguing over Mulder and Scully’s names to scribbling each other’s. By the time Mulder reaches Chucky and Scully reaches Judy, the twins have choked to death, destroying themselves by destroying each other.

Mulder and Scully are saved because they do the opposite. (Note that how similar their names are buys them time: Chucky and Judy each have “UL” on their pages but can’t agree on what letter to write next. Mulder and Scully are closer to one person than two; they’re already each other’s good doubles.) In a pitch-perfect ending, Scully rejects Mulder’s offer to get in a couple more hours of not-sleep; he retreats behind his inexplicable door and tells her to call if she needs anything. She probably won’t, she says — then opens the door to find Mulder waiting patiently just behind it. In their lives, the improbable is a guarantee.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 19:28



THE X-FILES “Plus One” Was One for the Shippers

Posted by Kyle Anderson on January 17, 2018

The following contains MAJOR SPOILERS for The X-Files episode 11.3, “Plus One.” We encourage you not to read the below until you’ve seen the episode. Because, after all folks, the truth is out there…and in here.

With the recent confirmation from Gillian Anderson that the current season of The X-Files is the last time she’ll playing Dana Scully, this more or less means the show is going to be done forever too. Through that lens, “Plus One” comes into much sharper focus, finally bringing to a head something a certain subset of X-Philes have been wondering about for a very long time: will Mulder and Scully just become a couple already?! Creator Chris Carter delivered easily his best episode as writer in the rebooted series with a story that answers that question and gives us a creepy horror story to boot.



After the continuity-shattering abomination that was “My Struggle III,” it’s especially funny that Carter scored a solid base hit with another story that more or less messes with people’s perception. This time, however, he focuses on his main characters–who, let’s remember, are the reason people kept watching the show in the first place–and had them discuss getting older and finally coming to some kind of terms with their relationship beyond work and friendship. I mean, sure it was revealed that William is their child (pre-“My Struggle III,” of course) and that they at least attempted to have some kind of something, but it was this episode that finally showed they’re willing to say what the hell.



In that sense, the title “Plus One” is especially apt. Even when a romantic relationship has been hinted at, it’s mostly been shown off screen, mostly unrelated to the case at hand. Here, we get Scully wondering about whether she’s passed her prime, and she sort of sees Mulder as the inevitable choice she never wanted to make. Let’s be honest, unrelated to David Duchovny’s attractiveness, Mulder is not a catch. He’s…kind of the worst. And he’s obviously very in to the idea of them getting together, but Scully–rightly–has known that despite their connection and fondness for one another, he’s almost too close to be a romantic partner. Even after they sleep together in this episode, she’s like “Nah, I’m good,” only to reconsider. It’s an example of the show answering questions and not answering them at the same time.



As for the rest of the episode, the ghost-murder plot is an effectively creepy one. People are haunted by their doppelgangers who eventually kill them. It makes for a very intense first act, one reminiscent of some of the best monster-of-the-week episodes in the original series. When the plot starts to come in to focus, we have an even weirder “explanation,” involving fraternal twins (both played by Karin Konoval, who memorably portrayed Mother Peacock in the infamous season four episode “Home”) who psychically play hangman with each other using the names of people they hate. This creates the ghostly doppelganger, which sort of replicates the twins and their weird invisible doppelgangers. It’s honestly a very weird premise, but it’s the kind of thing a show like The X-Files can pull off nicely, and it largely does here.



Ultimately, “Plus One” managed to be an episode about relationships while not skimping on the weird horror stuff. And it was full of humor: poop is flung at Scully’s head, and a lawyer who owned roughly a million firearms was killed by his ghost doppelganger with a samurai sword of his. I mean, it’s nuts. But, it’s the truth in our main characters that made the episode succeed, and as we ramp down to the final end of The X-Files, its character matters most.

Images: Fox TV


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Wed 17 Jan - 19:34

‘The X-Files’ Review: ‘Plus One’ Features Silly Plotting but Solid Character Work (Plus a Surprise for Longtime Fans)

As Season 11 continues, the bond between Mulder and Scully gains new scope.

Liz Shannon Miller
1 hour ago
@lizlet


Shane Harvey/FOX

[Editor’s note: Spoilers follow for “The X-Files” Season 11, Episode 3, “Plus One.”]

Previously, on “The X-Files”…


Mulder and Scully are FBI agents who investigate weird crimes. Sometimes those are stand-alone adventures. Also, they’ve been partners, off and on, professionally and personally, for 25 years now, though their exact relationship status has often been a bit nebulous.

This Week’s Dossier


After we see a young man spot his own double while driving drunk, it’s clear something weird is going on in a small rural Virginian community — confirmed by the fact that this is just one in a series of many other instances, where mysterious deaths are connected to the victims having seen their doubles beforehand. So it’s a good thing that Mulder and Scully, paranormal investigators, are on the case!

The partners figure out relatively quickly that at the core of the mystery are two very eccentric twins who like to play telepathic hangman — with the names they spell out correlating to deaths. Where do the twins get their powers? Who knows, but there’s a cool death where a sword-obsessed lawyer gets skewered by his own katana before eventually, the twins turn on each other, leading to their own demises.

Oh, and at some point Mulder and Scully do see their own doubles when the twins decide to target them, but all that really results from that is Mulder having a quick fistfight with his double self and Scully getting so spooked that she chooses to pay Mulder a nighttime visit, which results in the pair having an honest conversation about their relationship and then going to Pound Town. TWICE.



Wait, Explain It to Me Like I’m Five


Two crazy twins were terrorizing an entire community before eventually driving each other to their own deaths. Oh, and Mulder and Scully went to Pound Town. TWICE.

POUND TOWN


You’ll have to forgive us if we seem just a bit gleeful over this, because for years we’ve been waiting for affirmation of the fact that Mulder and Scully’s relationship exists outside of the definition of “platonic,” to the point of them actually, every once in a while, having sex. For 10 goddamn seasons, we’ve put up with forehead kisses and vague affirmations and lingering looks and yeah, there was some making out in the Season 9 finale and “I Want to Believe” but look, it’s been a long time coming, this day, and you will not take this moment away, you simply will not. We’re not even going to dwell on the fact that we never actually saw anything physical happen, because we now live in a world where an episode written by Chris Carter included undeniable evidence of the fact that Mulder and Scully have not only been to Pound Town before, but have been there multiple times.

It’s a good day, is what we’re saying. As long as we don’t think too hard about everything else that happened in the episode.

Nostalgia Alert!


This is the second Carter-written episode of the season so far, and it’s certainly better than “My Struggle III.” But, to be honest, that’s not saying much, especially given the memories it evokes of the seventh season episode “Fight Club,” also written by Carter, which not only featured twins who are at the center of strange events but some equally sloppy plotting. If “The X-Files” wants to remind us of older episodes, episodes like “Fight Club” are definitely not the ones to reference.



But It’s Not 1993 Anymore


Ha, did you think we were done talking about Mulder and Scully’s relationship? Don’t be silly, because there’s another component that’s worth celebrating — the fact that Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny got a chance to play a real and sincere scene about their characters’ past, present, and future, which is theoretically even more intimate than the actual journey to Pound Town. (It does, of course, help that they did the scene while lying together in bed.)

“I’m not going to ask you if you just said what I think you just said, because I know it’s what you just said.” (Most Awkward Quote)


“My sister’s a miserable slut and a damn cheater on top of it.”
— Chuckie

Sometimes, as a consumer of pop culture, you find yourself watching a storyline or character and realize that the writer of the episode got a real kick out of it — even if it leaves you completely cold. For this reviewer, at least, this was the case with the tale of Chuckie and Judy, two over-the-top weirdoes whose innate weirdness was just off-putting. (Though shout-out to Karin Konoval, making her third guest starring appearance on the series, for crazy levels of commitment.)

Let’s also use this section to say that every reference to the word “dookie” (dooky? really not sure about the spelling there) was relatively silly. And not in a good way.



“Dear Diary: Today my heart leapt when Agent Scully suggested ‘spontaneous human combustion.'” (Best Quote)


“You still got it going on… still got some scoot in your boot.”
— Mulder

Even outside their scene in bed together, Mulder and Scully were pretty cute in this episode, and Duchovny definitely had fun with this line.

Final Report


Narrative-wise, this case file was replete with clunky dialogue, bad exposition, and just an overall lack of sense, capped off by a truly anti-climatic climax that was resolved far too easily. So, there’s no way to grade this episode any higher, unfortunately.

However, the character work done at least gives us hope for future episodes, as it seems to indicate that Carter and the writers are thinking about Mulder and Scully not just as crime-solving avatars, but as people with decades of history between them. We’ve said it many times — Mulder and Scully are “The X-Files” — and watching them united in the struggle to find the truth is what’s kept their journey compelling all this time.

Grade: C+



IndieWire

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by Gato on Thu 18 Jan - 0:26

Estoy deseando verlo. En España esperamos todavía 1 semana.
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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 2:58



Plus One might just be the most 'shippy episode ever made of The X-Files

Alyse Wax
@alysewax
Jan 17, 2018

SPOILER WARNING! This is a recap of The X-Files' "Plus One," so the spoilers are out there

I have to get this out of the way: Mulder and Scully slept together!!! Like, blatantly, no other way to interpret the situation. "Put a dimmer on your afterglow." Yes, I am a die-hard 'shipper, and Mulder and Scully were ridiculously cute this week.

I had a lot to say about this week's episode, so I am going to break it down for you into smaller, bite-sized bits.

The Gist

Mulder and Scully go investigate a case in which a young man claims that his doppelganger tried to kill him. A dozen similar reports have come out of the same area, but all with the successful "suicides" of the other victims. Mulder and Scully discover a pair of twins, Chucky and Judy, have been playing a psychic, telepathic game of hangman in which the "subject" of each game is mysteriously killed by their doppelganger, their evil twin, who is unseen to everyone but the victim.


Shane Harvey/FOX
 
The Analysis

I had a hard time seeing past the Mulder/Scully relationship stuff to examine the plot. I really liked the plot overall, but it felt like it was a little thin. There was so much time spent on Scully's hang-ups, and cute interactions between her and Mulder, that I feel there was more backstory we could have had about Judy and Chucky. They were fascinating, and there was a lot left to be said about their background. For example, in Mulder's final scene at Chucky's house, the camera pans pointedly to hangman games with "Mom" and "Dad" as the answer. I assume that this means they killed their parents. Were their parents their first victims? Was there any reason behind their death? Abuse, neglect, scientific experiments? Or was it just because they could?

There was a lot of focus on Scully's preoccupation with age and kids. Now, this could just be leading back to her desire to find William. But it feels like maybe they are setting up for Scully to get pregnant again. On the one hand, then there would finally be a true Mully heir, but if Gillian Anderson is never going to play Scully again, I just can't have that "cliffhanger."

I feel like there was a lot of Mulder and Scully's relationship that happened during the break between the original series and revival series. While I appreciate that Chris Carter and company always focus on the case, with the relationship stuff as background fodder (that's how I was tricked into becoming a 'shipper!), it has left a lot of loose ends. In Season 10, I got the sense that Scully broke up with Mulder because he was getting too paranoid, too manic, too Mulder, to the point where he was on medication. Maybe Scully broke up with him because he wouldn't take his medication. Whatever happened, in tonight's episode it really felt like Scully was fighting with herself over her relationship with Mulder. She wants to be back with him, can't imagine her life without him, but the logical side of her doesn't want to fall back down that rabbit hole.


Shane Harvey/FOX
 
The Obsessive Recap (complete with snarky asides!)

Mulder presents a new case to Scully, that of Arkie Seavers. Arkie leaves a punk show when he sees his doppelganger hanging out at the back of the club. He drives away in a panic and starts to calm down when he sees himself in the passenger seat -- and his double grabs the wheel. The car slams into a tree, sending Arkie through the windshield. The reason that this case has piqued Mulder's interest is that there have been others in the area who commited suicide after seeing their double. With at least a dozen victims, Scully sees the urgency in the case, though she suspects it might be a rare form of schizophrenia, possibly with a mass hysteria edge. They head out, "back to their bread and butter."

At the prison, Arkie yields nothing useful, other than he has a half-dozen DUIs on his record. Next the agents stop at the local mental hospital and speak to a doctor who treated a few of the patients. Those that she saw had trouble with the law, but no one had a history of diagnosed mental illness. It's like there was an outbreak of non-conforming schizophrenia. Mulder takes interest in Judy, a patient they are told has a more traditional form of schizophrenia, with a dab of split personality. Judy instantly takes a liking to Mulder (who wouldn't?) and Mulder notices that the walls of her room are papered with games of hangman. Judy plays telepathically with her brother, Chucky. Mulder notices that the answer to one of the hangman games is Arkie. Judy doesn't know an Arkie, but "she" might, pointing to an empty chair in the corner of the room.

So here is where it starts to get all cutesy and 'shippy. The agents go check into a motel, but they only have one room available, a suite. Two rooms and a fold-out couch. Where in the world is there a motel that has a suite? Anyway, Scully doesn't agree until she hears there are two beds. Mulder insists he is "just trying to get some shut eye." Scully is glad to hear it. Naturally, Scully gets the bed. She is having a hard time sleeping, and rolls over to find Mulder standing creepily over her bed, staring. It gets even creepier when Mulder asks her if that bed is "nice and comfy," finishing off with a wink. Many a fan have certainly dreamed of a similar event in their own bedroom, but there is something unsettling about actually seeing it. Maybe it is the wink. Anyway, Scully urges him to go back to bed. "I wish I could," Mulder says. Arkie has just been found dead. So at least Mulder had a reason to be a creeper.

At the prison, Arkie has been hanged by his belt in his cell. His hands are cuffed behind his back, and the audience knows his doppelganger was in the cell with him. His attorney, Dean Cavalier, is apoplectic. Scully thinks it is a coincidence; Mulder isn't so sure.

The agents split up. Mulder goes to visit Judy's twin brother, Chucky, a hoarder who should probably be committed like his sister. Chucky works at the prison, and he remembers Mulder, with that "tasty redhead." Mulder avoids the question of whether or not he is "tapping that" and moves into the house, where Chucky has a collection of hangman games, just like Judy. Mulder finds the Arkie game and asks him about it. Chucky says he likes the name Arkie. He then starts talking to "him," standing behind Mulder. No one is there.

Scully heads back to the hospital to visit Judy, but she is the other Judy, "Demon Judy" today. Scully takes an authoritarian tone with Judy, who screams that her brother is the devil's dimwitted disciple and that Arkie just killed himself. Scully is surprised -- how did Judy know that? Scully tells her she wants the killing to stop. Judy ignores her and starts baiting her about her partner, asking what he sees in her. "One taste of Judy and he'd forget you exist!" she exclaims. Judy then attacks Scully's vanity -- something I didn't realize she had. She accuses Scully of being all dried up, past her childbearing years, and therefore half a woman. Scully insists that Judy can't hurt her, but it is unclear if she is saying that for Judy's benefit, or her own.


Shane Harvey/FOX
 
Back at the motel, Mulder and Scully compare notes. Mulder thinks evil is in the air; Scully says it is mental illness. They debate for a few moments, then Scully finally comes out with it: "Do you think of me as old?" Mulder smiles and asks where this is coming from. "A woman thinks about these things," she offers. He assures her she still has it going on, there is still some "scoot in your boot." She playfully pushes him out of the room, but Scully still seems troubled.

This didn't sit well with me, but it was for a strange, selfish reason. This humanizes Scully. The X-Files premiered when I was 12-years-old. Scully was perfection to me, something that I hadn't really seen on TV up to that point. She was a strong, beautiful, brilliant woman who could easily hold her ground with men, and she never relied on flirting with them to get their attention. I think this is a very good image of womanhood for a pre-teen to have, but I held onto that image of her my entire life. I have never seen this vulnerable, flawed side of her.

Anyway, back to the show. Mulder goes back to visit Chucky, but he meets the "other" Chucky, the pleasant one. Mulder thinks this is an act and needles Chucky until the Chucky he met yesterday comes out. That Chucky slams the door in Mulder's face. Meanwhile, Scully is with nice Judy, who has no recollection of seeing Scully the night before. Scully wants to speak to the evil Judy, and Judy directs her to the empty chair. Scully gets tough with her, accuses Judy of having some kind of power to influence people's lives. "You mean their deaths," Judy fills in. She offers Scully some pills to protect her, and Scully asks her not to play hangman with her brother anymore. A good idea, since Chucky has initiated another game with his sister, this one named for Arkie's attorney, Dean. Before she leaves, Scully asks the nurses about the pills, and they tell her Judy just stuffs the capsules with bread; there is nothing more than that in them. They still take them though, just in case. Scully considers this, then pockets the pills instead of throwing them away.

When Scully and Mulder return to the motel, they find Dean waiting for them, and he is freaking out. While at lunch he saw his doppelganger and it sent him into a panic. Scully advises him that his paranoia is making it worse, and while Mulder agrees with her assessment, warns Dean to take precautions. They tell him to stay home, lock the doors, and call the police if he has another panic attack (because I am sure the police really want to be bothered with that).

Dean goes home and frantically starts piling tools, guns, belts in his driveway... anything that can be used as a weapon. Then he realizes he has a bigger problem: the five display cases of swords in his living room.

Meanwhile, Judy is just one letter off from spelling Dean.

Dean starts gathering up his swords, but cuts himself on one. After cleaning up, he returns to the living room and finds his doppelganger standing there, wielding the sword.


Shane Harvey/FOX
 
Scully wakes and, once again, finds Mulder standing over her bed. She begs him to stop scaring her like that. "I'd like to quit," he says. It's not quite as creepy this time around. Dean's body has been found, and the agents go to the crime scene. They debate the physical possibilities of a person being able to decapitate themselves, as Dean's head is lying several feet away from his body. The two spend very little time at this crime scene. As Scully is about to get in the car, she sees her own doppelganger staring at her from the crowd of onlookers.

Back to bed. Scully wakes suddenly, and is actually surprised to see Mulder is not standing over her. So she goes to him. Sorry, it's going to get real 'shippy here. Scully stands over Mulder, just as he did, and admits she can't sleep. Something about this case is getting under her skin. "Can you hold me?" she asks. A beat, then Mulder pulls back the blanket and invites her into bed. They spoon, Mulder holding her very close. Scully is still worried about what happens when they get old and retire. "Are we going to spend time together?" Mulder assures her he'll always be around. She finally gets at what she really means: "What if you meet someone? Someone younger, who wants to have kids?" The kids talk. Mulder asks her the same, and she points out that she is "at the end of that journey." Scully admits she would have liked to have one more, and Mulder asks what's stopping her. "Besides the fact that the first one was a miracle and I don't have anyone to have one with, even if I could?" This is frustrating because her -- for lack of a better term -- life partner is literally holding her. Why would she think that Mulder wouldn't want to father another child with her (he doesn't know that William is CSM's biological kid).

Anyway, Scully changes the subject and says the world is going to hell and she and Mulder are the only ones who can stop it. Mulder takes this chance for a dig at the current administration: "The world is going to hell and the president is working to bring down the FBI with it." So that leads Scully to another concern: What if they lose their jobs? "Then what would we do?" Mulder asks innocently. Scully rolls over to face Mulder. "We'll think of something," she says, a slight, mischievous smile on her face. We see nothing else, as the camera pans off of them... to evil Scully, watching from a doorway.

The twins are playing a new round of hangman. There is a U already in place, and there is an L right next to it, but the clever placement of the camera obscures the other slots, so it is unclear if they are spelling Mulder or Scully.

When we return to Mulder and Scully, she is asleep (on the opposite side), he is awake. He goes for some water in the bathroom, then smiles proudly at himself in the mirror. The smile disappears as he sees his doppelganger step out of the shadows. In a panic, Mulder runs back to the bedroom, yelling for Scully to get dressed. Half asleep, she urges him to come back to bed. "They're coming after me!" Scully is awake now and sits up, the blanket slipping off her shoulder enough to see that she is naked beneath those blankets (and a million fans swoon). She admits she has seen her double, but while she handles it rationally, Mulder is panicked. "Put a dimmer on that afterglow and get yourself to the hospital!" He bolts. How chivalrous.

The twins have continued their game, but both have different victims in mind. Judy wants to spell out Scully, while Chucky wants to spell out Mulder. Mulder arrives at Chucky's house, but Chucky hardly notices him, he is so absorbed in the game -- and argument -- with his sister. Mulder sees his doppelganger and starts brawling with it. Scully, slightly slower than Mulder, sees her reflection in the car window and it gives her pause. She takes the handful of Judy's magic bread pills and gets in the car. As she drives, she sees her evil twin in the backseat. Scully speaks to it rationally, and it disappears.

Now, it could be that the way to deal with these manifestations was with calmness and rationality. Or it could be that Chucky and Judy turned on one another. They gave up their game with the agents and instead turn to each other. By the time Scully gets to the hospital, she finds Judy dead in her locked room. When Mulder climbs out from under an overturned bookshelf, he finds Chucky dead and his doppelganger gone.


Shane Harvey/FOX

Back at the motel, Scully is packing up. Mulder comes in and suggests they get a "couple hours in before checkout." She looks at him dubiously, and he quickly informs her that he only meant some shut-eye. "Glad to hear that, Mulder." An awkward pause, then Mulder says he should hit the hay. "But if you need anything, just call." Scully can't imagine that she will. Mulder leaves like a chastised puppy, trying not to look hurt or disappointed. Scully zips her bag and stares at the door. "But then again, it's not out of the realm of extreme possibility." She opens the door and finds Mulder leaning against the door frame, waiting. He smiles when he sees her.

And swoon!



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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 3:09



Exclusive: The X-Files director Kevin Hooks and 'Demon Judy' break down 'Plus One'

Tara Bennett
@TaraDBennett
Jan 17, 2018

SPOILER WARNING! This week's episode of The X-Files, "Plus One," discussed at length below.

Wait?! Did MSR (Mulder/Scully Romance) fans just see in "Plus One" what they've been hoping to see since the FBI agents lip-locked at the end of Season 8? Damn right they did, and all of that relationship goodness was mashed inside a classic-style X-File involving super creepy, Hangman-playing twins, Judy and Chuck.

In case you didn't catch it, the tour de force performance of both 'Little Judy' and cranky Chuck were both played by actress Karin Konoval. And surprise, this dual role is actually Konoval's third separate appearance on The X-Files. In 1995, she played Madame Zelma in "Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose," and returned a year later to play the twisted matriarch, Mrs. Peacock, in the uber-dark episode, "Home."

"Plus One" represents not only Konoval's triumphant return to the series, but it also marks veteran director Kevin Hooks' first time directing for The X-Files. He's directed over 50 seminal TV series, from 24 to Lost, but The X-Files always eluded him until now.

To get the dish on everything going on in this episode, we talked to Konoval and Hooks about bringing creator Chris Carter's story to the screen.

Let's step into the wayback machine first off, and let me ask you how it was you came to guest star in two classic episodes of The X-Files more than 20-years ago?

Karin Konoval: I think it was a single audition for the fortune teller on "Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose," but with Mrs. Peacock, there was an audition and then there was three callbacks after that before it finally happened.

"Home" still gives people nightmares. How did it impact you?

KK: What an amazing role, Mrs. Peacock. I know it was a very frightening episode for many people. It was also very frightening for me to shoot because I'm very claustrophobic and, of course, they had to build a coffin box that exactly fit my body. I had to be under the actual bed there. Phave said, "What do you think it is that scared people so much?' I've always said, you'd have to ask people individually what scared them, but for myself, I know that I was so scared under that bed that when they pull Mrs. Peacock out and I'm hollering, that was actually Karin just hollering and expressing all the fear and panic I felt under the bed. (Laughs)



In the years between, you have been a very busy character actress, including stunning work as Maurice the orangutan in the new Planet of the Apes movies. But when you hear that The X-Files is coming back, did you have any idea you might be asked to come back and play again?

KK: After "Home," Glen Morgan, who wrote that episode, cast me in a feature film, and I worked with him for the first time. He's just one of the finest gentlemen you could hope to meet, as is Chris Carter. I did a feature with Glenn, and then he cast me in two of his TV series, Tower Prep and Intruders. I so enjoyed being with him and the crews who work with him, and the team he surrounds himself with is just such joy. It was when we were in the middle of Intruders he said, "What else would you like to play?" I half jokingly said, 'I've always wanted to play a man on screen.' I think he stuck that in the back pocket of his brain somewhere, and we left it at that. I'm not someone who goes chasing jobs down. As the interesting work shows up, I do it. I heard The X-Files was back and all of a sudden, this past summer, it came up that there was a role that they really were interested in me for. I was sent eight pages of sides from the script with a scene for each [character]: Nice Judy, Nasty Judy, Nice Chucky, and Nasty Chucky. It wasn't like an audition, per se, but Chris wanted to know that I could convincingly transition from a female to a male.

What a great challenge!

KK: It was a wonderful gift to me as an actress. I spent a couple of days working by myself at home with these eight pages of script and the four characters, and I found each of them and dressed them and figured out how to do fast, quick makeup changes, and then did this test tape audition with my agent. We sent that in. I had such fun doing that. Really, by the time we sent that tape off, I knew I'd landed each of the characters in my gut, and then Chris was in agreement with that, I guess.

How much of the twins changed from that audition to the episode?

KK: What was so wonderful is that Chris and his whole team, is that it all originated from what I did in my test tape for them. Actually, even the wonderful SFX artist, Bill Terezakis, went one step further for my test tape; I had pulled my hair back, and tried to disappear it. Bill decided to just let my hair be. I was like, 'Not even a wig?' And he was like, "You don't need a wig." The makeup is actually very minimal and allows me, the actor, to do my full thing. The hair job to glue my big hair back was considerable, and then there's the mustache, the sideburns, and a little dusting of five o'clock shadow. Bill crafted these more masculine earlobes for me, because my earlobes are very delicate and feminine. It's literally the smallest bit of prosthetic, and then the eyebrows are just drawn on, otherwise, I'm not wearing makeup as Chucky. That's just me.


 
Was there any backstory that Chris provided you, or did you create one, because I could have watched a whole episode about how those two came to be.

KK: No, actually. I start with the script. I learn the script cold, word for word. Chris' scripts are so beautiful, and there's no gratuitous words. Everything you need to know is in there. As I learned for the test tape, the four scenes, for Judy-Judy and Chucky-Chucky, those began to give me something. I went looking for where do each of the lead come from physically? I had to find their physicality, just like I had to find Mrs. Peacock's physicality, or Maurice's, as the more extreme character. I actually determined for myself that it felt to me like, nice Judy led from her left shoulder, sort of sideways into the world, and all just very scared of everything, especially the other side of herself. Then Nasty Judy like she just leads from the chest, like, "You want me, you know you want me," and this changed the physicality that way. Then nice Chucky's just like, "Everything's fine by me, whatever," so it felt like a stomach lead. Nice Chucky's just sort of relaxed in his body. Then Nasty Chucky felt like taking Nice Chucky, but shooting with a knife or a laser from the left side of my forehead, so Nasty Chucky's just in your face, like, "This is what you want? What do you want?" And each of those physicality's created a voice.

Did any other layers form in the shooting of it?

KK: As we were filming, I decided to make one of them right-handed and one of them left-handed. With Chucky, you saw the disaster at his house, so I thought I'm going to make him right-handed, because I'm left-handed. If I write right-handed, it's a bit more of a scrawl. So then I made Judy left-handed because it would be a cleaner script.

How was it working against GIllian and David?

KK: We just had a great time. I can say that doing the scenes between Chucky and Mulder, David Duchovny is an extremely funny man. He's got a twinkle deep in his eye. So much was shot in very tight close-up, so I could see that twinkle in his eye coming many a time, and I thought, "I'm not going to crack up. I am not going to crack up!" The rhythm of those Chucky-Mulder scenes was just a delight to play.

And now you can say you have three classic X-Files episodes on your resume!

KK: What a beautiful gift, hey? It's a gift for Chris to write this and let me do this. Kevin (Hooks) was just so tremendous throughout and so appreciative. These are wonderful, wonderful people, and Glen carried this in his mind and passed this on to Chris. This is really beautiful stuff.






Kevin, you've directed just about every modern classic TV series of the last three decades except The X-Files. When you heard it was coming back, did you make it a priority to direct one?

Kevin Hooks: Yes, I was probably one of the few handful of directors in Hollywood who had not directed an episode of The X-Files, so there was a yearning on my part. I feel like I had missed something very significant and when it came back, I was really excited about that. I didn't know that I would get a chance to do it, but I was excited that it was back. And then, Chris reached out to me and asked if I'd be interested in doing the show. I thought it's not every day that you get the creator of the show to call you on the phone and ask you to be a part of it. So I said, "Absolutely!" and we went up to Vancouver.

As is often the case with The X-Files scripts, they move around in the production order or they change a lot. Was "Plus One" always the episode you were assigned to direct?

KH: Actually, the episode that Chris and I talked about was slightly different. I think originally, there was a racial component in the script that he wanted to tell, and I guess during the course of development of this season, that idea went by the wayside. So, honestly, when I got to Vancouver and got the "Plus One" script, that was the first time that I realized that the idea that he and I had discussed earlier in the summer had been scrapped or delayed, or what have you.

Surprise! So what about "Plus One" grabbed you creatively?

KH: Yes, they caught me by surprise but what I immediately responded to with "Plus One" was that it felt like classic The X-Files. Everybody who read it in pre production, and in all the meetings, that's what people were saying about the script. I was really excited about that. Then, in terms of the things that really got me excited, I was hot to address the doppelganger of it all, from a technical and emotional standpoint. That was something that was going to be a unique challenge and one I hadn't faced before.

Then, secondarily, when I met Karin Konoval, I was absolutely thrilled. Her performance is just nothing short of amazing in this episode. I was really excited to work with her. When she told me her experience on the Planet of the Apes movies, and she started to discuss the physicality of these different characters, I really got excited because I realized that she was going to bring even more to these roles than I could ever have anticipated. I thought the first time we met with her, "Oh this is going to be a lot of fun."

Doppelganger stories have been around a long time, but we're in a post Orphan Black world now, which really raised the bar in terms of multiple performances and blocking those portrayals in a kinetic way. What was your goal in using that trope in this episode?

KH: I did a lot of research and our visual effects supervisor was really instrumental in helping us understand the technicalities of it because it's something that I hadn't done before. I think the key to it was that we wanted to make sure that we could move the camera. We really tried to create and design shots that had both characters, or the same actor in the same shot ,and also be able to move the camera. Traditionally, you see split screens and the audience is way out in front of that. Over the shoulders, across doubles to the actor and then back. We've seen that before. I did look at a lot of Orphan Black sequences to just see how they handled it. I thought they did such a magnificent job and it really was very helpful in terms of how I wanted to approach these sequences.



David mentioned how much he enjoyed this episode. How did you work with him in terms of making it fun for him. He certainly fights himself, which is very cool and something that he hadn't done before.

KH: Like any show that you go to where you have not worked, in this case David and Gillian, you want to create a sense of trust that is going to give them a comfort level and an ability to accept the input that you're giving them. So, over all, that was my goal. Fortunately, a lot of the doppelganger stuff, particularly David's fight, was later in the shooting schedule. He really had some time to get to know me a little bit and understand what my thoughts were and what I was trying to do. He really was enthusiastic about trying to get what we wanted to do and to really make it fun for the audience.

That really was trust, not only of the doppelganger sequences with him, but also as it related to the intimacy of the story between he and Gillian. It was paramount that trust be established and that, at the same time, they understood that I did not want to get in the way. I wanted to have them feel free to offer their experience of the last ten years because that's really what the show is all about. They know a lot more about it than I do. It was really about trust and establishing that.

So let's talk about the Mulder and Scully of it all, as the episode gives us these wonderful intimate sequences that this fandom has literally been waiting to even partially see for the entirety of this series. They are together, for real, in a bed with what Mulder calls "afterglow"! How did you approach how much to show?

KH: It's interesting because sometimes the most intimate of scenes turn out to be the most mechanical and technical scenes that you can do. We had the doppelganger scenes, which I think everybody can see how technical that is. But the irony of it is that the scene in the bed with them was about as technical as it could be. It was all about what you could see, or couldn't see, and the body language was extremely important in terms of how they responded to each other, and how they touched each other, and where Mulder's hand was when he touched Scully. What we wanted to do, obviously, was preserve the surprise and the reveal for the next scene which is a very quick cut of Mulder waking up and getting out of bed to go to the bathroom and that's the scene you realize "Aha! I see what's happened here." It turned out to be quite a technical scene. It's funny how that worked out.

I'm sure that David and Gillian had their own thoughts about their characters, so did they have a lot of say about what felt comfortable and what was the best way to express that?

KH: Right. That's the interesting thing about coming into a long-running show like The X-Files, which is that everyone involved in it has so much to offer. I wanted to make sure that I exhausted as much of that as I possibly could and really give myself every opportunity to be successful in these relationships. Even though the reality is, yeah, there was a lot of dialogue about that, there was even more dialogue about how to deal with the fact that these characters were 20-some-odd years older than when we left them. They are older people and we have some very delicate dialogue about children and the desire to have more children in that scene, so there was a lot of input from David and Gillian in terms of what both of them, particularly Scully, would be feeling in that moment. It was really a revelation, for me, to watch them work with Chris from a script standpoint in that scene, and to find a happy medium in terms of what that scene was going to be and how it turned out.

Do you have a favorite scene from the episode?

KH: Ultimately, I probably would have to say that it was the scene in the bedroom with the two of them because that was the scene that was really grounded in the mythology of the series. Those scenes are the most fun to do because they're the most challenging. As I said, there's so much subtext and so much information that is stored up to prepare for a scene like that that it's always a real pleasure to have those kinds of moments in the episode.


SYFY WIRE

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 3:15

The X-Files 11.3 Review – ‘Plus One’

January 17, 2018 | Posted by Wednesday Lee Friday



6.5 The 411 Rating

Tonight’s episode, Plus One is a standard monster-of-the-week episode. It’s not about a wedding, as the name sort of implies. That should have been amazing. But I found myself getting sidetracked by Scully’s ageist laments and Mulder’s surprising response. Who are these people? What is Chris Carter trying to tell us about them with this nonsense? Is he just setting us up for a series finale where we never see Mulder or Scully again? I’m not sure; but I don’t love it. Spoilers abound for Plus One.

We begin E3 with a rocking club scene and a dude named Arkie—who looks like what would happen if DJ Qualls and Evan Peters combined their DNA. Arkie is having a swell time until he sees his doppelganger. He follows, leading to a scene where his speeding, unseatbelted person lands on the hood of his destroyed car. Shockingly, Arkie lives.



When Arkie tells Mulder and Scully what happened, we’re treated to the usual X-Files rundown of what might be causing this latest crazy thing. Is Arkie lying? Is it a rare form of schizophrenia? What about mass hysteria? It seems like many people have had this happen in recent months, and all but Arkie are dead now. A doc suggests that they might have become mentally ill where they weren’t before. Really? The investigation introduces us to “Little” Judy, a psyche-ward inmate who claims to play telepathic hangman with her twin brother. Riiiight. But wait, she does. Chucky, Judy’s twin, may be even more eccentric and off-putting.

When our favorite FBI agents show up to rent rooms for the night, we’re treated to the overplayed awkwardness about how they couldn’t possibly share a room. Surprise surprise, they end up sharing a room. Mulder wakes Scully when Arkie dies, and she seems uncomfortable to see Mulder in the room. Days later, Arkie’s lawyer has a similar problem. He was, as Simon Pegg would say, decaffeinated. Seems that all the victims of this phenom are criminals, or criminal adjacent. When Mulder wakes Scully to tell her about this death, we see that he’s sleeveless and super friggin’ buff. Maybe that’s inappropriate for me to point out—but you know Mulder would be fine about women ogling his physique.



There’s some humor to be had this week. Scully getting poo flung at her by a smarty-pants “Demon Judy” was amusing, if disgusting. Mulder quipping “No Sugar, Sherlock” was funny to me, mainly because saying “sugar” instead of [expletive] is ridiculous. Dean the lawyer trying to rid his home of weapons seemed smart—until we saw his enormous collection of katanas. Scully’s explanation for why people think they see ghosts was also delightful, if debatable on a few counts. I enjoyed that the lawyers last name was “Cavalier.” What criminal lawyer isn’t, right?

Around the halfway point of Plus One, Scully and Mulder agree that the siblings are affecting their insane personalities, and are lying about most things—if not everything. It’s hinted at that the twins used their malevolent telepathy powers to kill their parents. The evil game of hangman they play is causing the spate of doppelganger murders, though we’re not exactly sure how it all works. The twins play the game, and the person whose name is the answer is the one who dies. That must mean Chucky is picking them, or do they take turns? Either way, we see a new hangman board that tells us either Scully or Mulder (the game suddenly switches to last names even though Judy was introduced to the team as “Dana” and “Fox”—which must mean Chucky is choosing them as victims).

By the end of the ep, it’s all wrapped up pretty neatly. The nefarious twins use their powers to kill each other. That’s a little sad, as I sort of enjoyed their childish name calling. Judy didn’t seem like a “miserable slut” to me. As expected, neither Mulder nor Scully is injured by their own dopppels, though they both had occasion to see them and be afraid. No word from Skinner, Mr. Y, Barbara Hershey, Miller and Einstein, or anyone else aside from the mains this week. We did get to meet two hilarious nurses and some claptrap about ‘pills’ made out of smooshed bread. This claptrap never actually goes anywhere though, which I found annoying. If they’re going to tell us that the nurses ate the bread pills made by a patient, they really have to follow that up.



When Dana speaks to Demon Judy, we’re startled to see how upset Scully is at being called “old.” Ladies, once you hit 40, you’re not a young chick anymore. That’s not a bad thing, it’s just a fact. One would think someone as science-minded as Scully would know that, and wouldn’t get all sad about this realization. I half expected her to start googling makeup tips for older women. She laments not having more children, and worries aloud about how she would feel if Mulder met a younger woman who wanted to have kids. He says she could do the same thing. There’s so much wrong with this, I barely know where to begin.

I have no problem with Scully and Mulder having more sex, which they did this week. But I do take issue with all the pains she takes to keep things professional and appropriate, only to pop over in the middle of the night to ask him to hold her. While I appreciate that they have a long and nuanced relationship—that seems perilously close to a mind-game to me. Either be appropriate and professional, or admit that you’re not adhering to those standards. This somewhere-in-the-middle line is uncomfortable, even though we all know a sexual harassment claim between these two is highly unlikely.



Why does Scully even care that she’s getting old? Given how they talk about it, her main concerns seem to be physical attractiveness and her ability to procreate. She knows perfectly well that older women do have babies. At the same time, Mulder speaks as if he doesn’t know the difference between an older man having a kid with a young woman, versus the opposite. It is much less likely that Scully could get pregnant at her age. Not impossible, but not a “just do it” thing. So all of that came across as mishandled and a little dishonest all around. Even though I enjoyed the rest of the episode, I’m taking off two whole points for that. We’ve spent far too much time with these characters to be cool with seeing them treated like this.



After Chuck and Judy die, and we affirm that Dana and Fox are safe, we see two old hangman puzzles confirming that Chuck and Judy did use their powers to kill their parents. I could do with a prequel ep telling us why. That sounds a lot more interesting than siblings squabbling over who has a crush on who. Still, they were fun is not especially deep.

Good news! Next week, according to the previews, is the black comedy episode. It’s supposed to be the stand-out gem of the season, according to critics well-connected enough to get the episodes early. I’m super stoked!

See you’s next week!

6.5
The final score: review Average
The 411

Strong, intelligent female leads are a rarity on TV—but Dana Scully has always been one of the best. Maybe that's why I found it off-putting to hear her whining about getting older, lamenting not having more kids, and hopping into bed with you-know-who.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 3:22

The X-Files Season 11 Episode 3 Review: Plus One

Modwild Carissa Pavlica at January 17, 2018 9:00 pm. Updated at January 17, 2018 9:20 pm.

This is the episode in which Karin Konoval returns.

Konoval is one of the most well-known actresses from The X-Files universe having played the mother under the bed on "Home."

On The X-Files Season 11 Episode 3, she plays a dual role as telepathic twins who have made a life for themselves playing hangman. Their game rules are a bit more unconventional than most other boys and girls.



This was a tough one to figure out. Was it serious, goofy, somewhere in the middle?

Who doesn't love a doppelganger theory? When Mulder proposed they needed to check that out, it never would have dawned on me we were on our way to telepathic twins who dabbled in the oddest game of hangman I've ever seen.

Scully's scientific skepticism was on full power as she determined immediately the entire town was undergoing a mass phenomena, even after the doctor they visited admitted that while it was her final conclusion, she only went there for lack of any other diagnosis.



In a mental facility, they came upon Little Judy who may or may not have been a former actress. She could have been a former hangman champion for all I knew, but she damn well was telepathic and a mass murderer -- both of people and the game of hangman.

Yes, people! It got on my last nerve Chucky and Judy didn't know how to play hangman. Who is still drawing arms and legs on a game when all the slots under the hung man are already taken? What kind of mad world were they living in????

Surely, I just. I know, don't call you Shirley.



Konoval made a much greater impression as the kooky telepathic twins than she did under the bed on "Home," but something tells me she'll still always be remembered for her earlier role.

At least she had roles into which she could sink her teeth with Judy and Chucky. And she even got to have crushes on those enigmatic agents, Scully and Mulder! What a great chance to do it all over again, right?

Konoval's coup de grace was angrily switching up the game as the twins fought over the agents and then each other. When a monster of the week can be one person as two, you know you're watching magic!

Scientific Scully was full of laughs as she determined it was possible that it was in the realm of possibilities that Dean the Attorney could have swung around like a skilled ninja and lopped off his own head spraying blood all over the walls.



For Scully, anything is possible as long as she doesn't have to admit there is something supernatural going on.

Judy: What are you, 40s? You're all dried up. Not even half a woman.
Scully: You can't hurt me, Judy.
Judy: Nothin' hurts like the truth.

Scully was feelin' the pain of Judy, her sexual adversary's jabs, too.

There is no time like the middle of a murder investigation to consider you might be right reaching the end of your sexual peak. Maybe the men don't think too much of you anymore and you're all washed up.

Why Judy, of all people, would be the person who brought those feelings out in Scully is a conundrum in itself, but a bigger question is why Scully and Mulder are still slinking around who they are to each other.

It was just on The X-Files Season 11 Episode 2 they were thick as thieves, snuggling on the couch and so in sync it appeared they couldn't get any closer.

Suddenly, Scully can't imagine sleeping in the same bed with Mulder and is asking questions like "what happens when we're older?" She was asking without being straight about it if they would be in their lives for the foreseeable future and long after.



Even odder, their talk about meeting others and Scully not having more children because she wasn't able and didn't have anyone to have them with if she could (huh?) was strangely misplaced, as if perhaps this episode should have aired before the other.

Now that I think about it, isn't that a given since they're out of the X-Files after the stuff that went down with Skinner? Are they even allowed in the office at this point or aren't the black ops people after them anymore?

No. They are not. On "This" they were bemusing the fact they no longer had access to the X-Files and had to get them secretly from Skinner. The episodes are out order. Le friggin' sigh.

Oh well, Scully and Mulder wound up in bed and from the lack of clothing, we can assume they got frisky and not overly warm. Scully later used her phrase about the realm of possibilities and wanting to spend a few more hours in the sack with Mulder, so this must have been our re-introduction to their romance.

It's a bit confusing, to be sure, but if you watch The X-Files online, you know there is rarely a time these things don't come off as at least a little confusing, right?

The hangman killers were a fun twist on the usual cases of the week, and despite the fact I wondered why nobody in the hospital noticed the names of the town's dead hanging all over Judy's walls, they must have gotten away with a lot of murders starting out with their mom and dad who knows when.

Even seeing Scully's and Mulder's doppelgangers gave the Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny something a little different to do rather than playing their usual characters.

If only it wasn't out of order, it would have been a lot less confusing overall. Because going from "This" to "Plus One" was a dramatic difference in the couple's relationship and yes, I noticed.

What did you think? Did you enjoy Karin Konoval's performance as the twins? What about the goofy take on the small town murders?

Drop me a line in the comments and let's chat.

Plus One Review
Editor Rating: 3.5 / 5.0


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 3:28

‘The X-Files’ Season 11, Episode 3: 18 things we learned in ‘Plus One’


Mulder and Scully (David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson) have some heart-to-heart conversations in the "Plus One" episode. Fox

By Caitlin O'Conner
Published: January 17, 2018

The X-Files delights in keeping viewers on their toes, asking dozens of questions and only half-answering half … only to turn around a few episodes (or seasons) later and challenge those same notions. Herewith is a list of things we learned in Season 11, Episode 3, "Plus One," a wild monster of the week episode with equal amounts horror (beheading!) and humor (flung dookie!).

·       Mulder and Scully are, in Mulder's words, "back to our bread and butter" investigating a phenom in Virginia wherein people see a doppleganger before killing themselves.

·       They meet a mentally ill woman named Judy who says she plays hangman telepathically with her brother.

·      Despite Scully saying "our home" in the last episode, Mulder and Scully don't want to share a hotel room. And when they have to, Mulder sleeps on the pullout.

·       The woman's brother, a hoarder/jail employee named Chucky, asks Mulder if he's "tapping that feisty little redhead." He doesn't answer.

·       The other twin asks Scully, "what does he see in you, your handsome partner?"


Scully doesn’t believe in ghosts.

·       Scully believes in "psychic transference." And even says so. Ghosts, not so much.
M: "I wouldn't rule out ghosts."
S: "Except that they don't exist."

·       Scully believes evil is a concept, not a literal thing … just like the devil. Mulder is disappointed in Catholic Dana Catherine Scully. But admits she sleeps with her back to the door … in case the devil comes in the night.

·       Scully also believes "it's not beyond the realm of extreme possibility" for a man to cut off his own head.

·       Brought on by the twin Judy, Scully has a minor crisis about aging and having children.

·       Mulder reassures: "You've still got it goin' on. Still got some scoot in your boot."

·        “Can you hold me?” Scully asks Mulder when freaked out. OF COURSE HE CAN.

·       Scully thinks they're getting old. Mulder knows they're already old — "What's gonna happen … when we're old?" "What do you mean when?" — other than when it comes to having kids. #Men, amirite?

·       Scully is afraid Mulder is going to meet someone younger who wants to have kids. Scully knows she's not going to have any more, but admits she would have liked to have had another one. Mulder has clearly forgotten all of the obstacles to this.

·       "Sometimes I think the world is going to hell and we're the only ones who can save it." "The world is going to hell. And the president working to bring down the FBI along with it."


Mulder knows what happens.

·       Things happen. Yeah. THINGS. You know exactly what I mean. Sex. Mulder even says “afterglow.”

·       Both Mulder and Scully see their doubles.

·       Mulder thinks they can get a couple hours in — of shut eye. Scully is "glad to hear that."

·       Buuuut being together is not out of the realm of extreme possibility. And she goes to meet him.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 3:45




Scully & Mulder Disagree Over Ghosts Being Real | Season 11 Ep. 3 | THE X-FILES

The X-Files
Publicado em 17 de jan de 2018

All of the talk about the paranormal has Scully rattled about getting older.

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 7:10

The X-Files Season 11: 10 Things We Learned From Plus One

The X-Files takes a peek at its own reflection.



The strong start to season eleven of The X-Files continued with its third episode, Plus One. Featuring a look into murderous doppelgangers, though it wasn't quite classic X-Files, it had enough moments calling back to the heyday of the show to represent a reasonable facsimile. Curiously, however, what was learned from the episode was more in what it wasn't, than what it was.

The first outright standalone episode (or Monster of the Week, if you prefer) of the season, Plus One stepped away entirely from the mythology of the show. In fact, Mulder knowingly referred to it as going back to his and Scully's "bread and butter" — though whether you agree with that or not likely depends on how you feel about the show's alien conspiracy mythology. Still, by not focusing on conspiracies, aliens, and corrupt governments, we learned once again that The X-Files was always much more than that.

Sometimes, all you need is a refresher course.

Ultimately, Plus One was an odd tale of psychic siblings on the surface, while deeper down, it was an examination of the show itself, the relationship between Mulder and Scully, and even a bit of a treatise on the nature of good versus evil. While it struggled at times to find its tone, it was a mostly fulfilling outing — so let's take a look at what we learned from it.

10. Karin Konoval Gets Her Place In X-Files History


FOX

Karin Konoval may not be a household name, but she is now the answer to an obscure trivia question: name an actress who has portrayed multiple characters on The X-Files. In a single episode.

The X-Files is well-renowned for recycling actors. Prior to portraying the murderous Agent Krycek on the show, actor Nicholas Lea appeared in the first season episode Genderbender in a small role as "Michael" — a young man on the wrong side of an encounter with an alien looking to experience life on Earth. Nor is Lea (or Konoval) an isolated case. In season ten, the show brought back Alex Diakun, which marked his fourth appearance on the show in four separate roles.

Despite that milestone, Konoval may in fact be the first woman to portray three separate roles on the series. And she is definitely the first woman to portray three roles in a single episode. Konoval plays the telepathic schizophrenic 'Little Judy,' and her more sinister alter-ego. She also plays Chucky, Judy's brother (and if you really want to get technical, she also plays his doppelganger).

It's a heck of a performance, and if Chucky seems a little "odd" at first, it's likely because he's being portrayed by the same woman you watched moments earlier wearing a gown playing hangman in a psychiatric hospital.

It's a heck of a turn from Konoval, who also appeared as Madame Zelma in Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose and Mrs. Peacock in Home.

9. Suicide Clusters Are An Actual Phenomenon


FOX

The basis of Plus One is the idea that doppelgangers are killing people, and making it look like suicides. Most of the deaths appear to be hangings, and many of them seem nearly impossible for the victim to have carried out themselves. During the course of their investigation, Mulder and Scully examine the case as the pair are wont to do: Mulder looks to the paranormal (ghosts! he says, while Scully claims there are no such thing) while Scully returns to her traditional role as skeptic.

We'll get back to this blast-from-the-past characterization later, but for now, let's focus on an explanation Scully brings up early in the episode: suicide clusters. Suicide clusters are, apparently, an actual phenomenon, though not a supernatural one. Essentially copy-cat suicides, they've been more and more under the microscope in the modern age, as a result of how closely people are connected online. Think cases where cyberbully has led young boys and girls to suicide, and how suggestible young people can be. See the problem?

That said, suicide clusters are not a modern phenomenon — in the month following the death of Marilyn Monroe in 1962, the suicide rate rose as much as twelve percent.

Of course, this being The X-Files, something as "mundane" as suicide clusters would never be the answer, but that's still crazy to think about.

8. In A Time Of Crisis, The Most Skeptical Of Us Still Turn To Faith


FOX

Dana Scully, as X-Files fans well know, was raised as a Catholic. While she's turned to science in terms of her career, over the years, she has had several crises of faith. And each time she has always found some sign or meaning that perhaps a higher power was out there.

Still, Scully is a scientist. A medical doctor. She goes back to those roots in Plus One, but an interesting twist happens: Scully, upon seeing her own doppelganger — and really, her own mortality — is not above trying a little faith, blind faith really. During the episode, she resorts to taking placebo bread pills in the hopes of warding off her murderous doppelganger. What's even more interesting (and well-constructed by those in charge of this week's episode) is that they may have worked, though we're never really sure.

Scully rationalizes her glimpse of Other-Scully, essentially talking herself out of seeing her evil twin. Or was it the pills she took earlier? Either way, Scully's choice to take the pills (in fact, her choice to keep them in the first place after she nearly discarded them) is a nice twist. And a sign that modern-day Scully is more than just a skeptic.

7. The Series Is Now As Much From Scully's Perspective As Mulder's


FOX

One of the more interesting aspects of the revived X-Files has been how the show has changed focus, albeit subtly. Perhaps not even consciously. In the original run, Dana Scully was a scientist/medical doctor assigned to debunk Fox Mulder's work on The X-Files.

It's all laid out in the pilot. Scully soon saw the importance of his work, and joined his search for the truth — while remaining a healthy skeptic. It made the character compelling. Yet despite her obvious importance to the show, the series was more often than not Mulder's story. Not that Scully wasn't half that, but rather, the truth was witnessed through Mulder's eyes. Think back to the first X-Files movie. Mulder sees a massive alien craft lift out of Antarctic ice, while Scully passes out. Through the years Mulder chased after his sister. Mulder struggled with the death of his dad, the loss of his mother, and the reality that the Smoking Man was his real father.

Scully's losses mostly came as subplots.

Not so now. Since the show returned, Scully has been front and center. There's a lot more equality in terms of perspective, and that's a good thing. We've dealt with Scully's yearning for her lost son, and in Plus One, we discover her uncertainty about the future. "What happens when we get old?" she asks Mulder. She worries that he'll find someone else, that they won't spend time together.

It's the most poignant scene of the episode, and it's important, because now, we're seeing things more from Scully's side.

6. The Show Very Much Wants The "Will They Or Won't They" Feeling Back


FOX

Sam and Diane. David and Maddie. Ross and Rachel.

"Will they or won't they" pairings have always been a television gold mine. While The X-Files was never designed with that in mind, the undeniable chemistry between Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny changed the course of the series after just a few seasons. It divided the fanbase, helping popularize the terms ship (as in relationship) and shipper (as is relationshipper, or a supporter of a Mulder/Scully relationship). Those terms are still used today when fans of any number of shows say they "ship" one set of characters or another.

The whole "will they or won't they" angle got stronger as the show went on, at least until season seven, when the question was answered, sort of. It also drew in an entire army of fans more interested in the relationship than the paranormal, a rather unintended (but welcome, no doubt, to those watching the ratings at FOX) consequence.

How does that relate to anything we learned in Plus One? Because in Plus One, the show is desperately trying to get that "will they or won't they" feeling back. Mulder starts the episode sleeping on the couch when the agents share a hotel room. There are nods to past transgressions, but nothing is discussed outright, just hinted at. The pair clearly love each other, but the subject is danced around.

5. But Lightning Simply Doesn't Strike Twice


FOX

No matter how hard they try, 1013 is simply not going to be able to get that "will they or won't they" feeling back.

Because they did. We know they did, and that doesn't rely on who William's biological father is.

Look, a nostalgia trip can be fun. It's why we love Stranger Things. It's why we can't wait for the next Star Wars film, no matter how questionable some of the writing has been for every episode since The Empire Strikes Back. It's why The X-Files revival worked in the first place. We want to go back to a better time (for once, nostalgia isn't a lie, as the 90s pretty much were a better time).

But since we know that Mulder and Scully were together at one point, there's really no need. And any attempt just seems silly in the end. You can't get that feeling back. That ship has sailed. The suspense is all gone. Scully even closed the door on it (actually, opened the door on it) when, at the end of Plus One, she decided the join Mulder for a "nap," after saying to herself that it was "within the realm of possibility" that she might need something from him.

Okay, if we're being honest, it was fun trying. Just don't do it every week.

4. Balancing Serious Drama With Comedic Elements Is A Tricky Task


FOX

If there's a drawback to Plus One, it's tone. No, not if. There is a drawback, and that was it.

Plus One starts off quite dark, with an alarming cold open that we'll discuss shortly. It quickly turns bloody... and then, when we're introduced to the antagonists of the episode, Judith and Chucky, it gets a bit... silly. Silly, where things should have been spooky. Call it "Season 7 Disease." Season 7 of The X-Files was perhaps the low point of the series, and that includes the seasons that were light on Mulder. The show, listening to critics who claimed it could be funnier than most comedies, started producing more and more light-hearted episodes.

The end result was a sunny mess, with episodes like Fight Club (which also tackled doppelgangers), that probably never should have been produced.

Plus One is far from that, but Little Judy (Judith, in the persona of a young child) and Chucky, her telepathically linked brother, come off more odd and quirky than dark and sinister. And that's a shame. It's still a killer performance by Karin Konoval (you may not even realize she's playing Chucky at first), and it's more about how the scenes are written and shot. The X-Files was always at its best when it was dark. In Plus One, a little too much is brought out of the shadows.

In short, it prevents a good episode from being great.

3. Cold Opens Remain One Of The X-Files Strengths


FOX

Plus One starts out at a punk show (perhaps a nod to X-Files writer/producer Glen Morgan, a punk rock fan). There, we meet Arkie Seavers. Arkie is having the time of his life. He manages to get up on stage. Stage dives, crowd surfs — then sees his own sinister doppelganger watching him. He bails out, follows this vision of himself out the door (which eerily closes on its own).

Next thing we know, Arkie is in his car heading home. He's had one too many, and he panics when a police car drives up on him, but the cruiser rolls past — false alarm. Then Arkie looks beside him, and it's like looking in a mirror. The other Arkie attacks, forces the car off the road, where it crashes into a tree.

Cut to the opening credits, which are modified again this week to show "The truth is out there" twice (a nod to this week's theme).

In any case, this cold open (or teaser if you prefer) was another good one, following up on This from last week, which was also stellar. One of The X-Files greatest strengths is getting you hooked early. It doesn't always stick the landing, but once you're sucked in, it's hard to look away.

2. Sometimes You Can Go Home Again


FOX

As much as The X-Files won't be able to get back the "will they or won't they" feel, with Plus One, the show proved that sometimes, you can go home again. In returning Dana Scully to her skeptical roots — partway, at least — the series turned back the clock. It did so without warning. Without explanation. Scully, who has come to believe in aliens and government conspiracies over the years, just suddenly went back to dismissing the paranormal.

And somehow, it worked. It didn't feel like going backwards. It felt as if the balance was back in the show. Having Scully keep Mulder honest was always kind of the point, after all. Instead of allowing him to leap from A to Z, she would at least keep him jumping from A to C, forcing him to flesh out his theories. It's why we love her (well, part of it anyway).

In Plus One, when Scully rationally explained how a man with his hands cuffed could possibly hang himself from the bars of his jail cell — that was good ol' skeptical Scully. We missed her.

If the show keeps this up for the remainder of the season, it'll be just fine. Yes, Scully needs to be a believer at times, but a reluctant believer, one who needs to see all the evidence and eliminate every other possible explanation.

Twice.

After all, there's nothing wrong with a little healthy skepticism, even on The X-Files.

1. We Learn As Much About The Show Itself As We Do About Its Characters


FOX

Plus One taught us that Mulder doesn't see himself with anyone but Scully. It's subtle, but it's there if you read between the lines a little. It taught us that Scully fears for her future, that she's unsure of what's to come. What to do when she gets old. She worries about the transition to her golden years, where she'll be retired. She no doubt worries she'll be bored, and alone. And that she sleeps with her back to the door, just in case some evil might be lurking.

Those are common fears, that crop up more and more the older you get. We learn a lot about the agents in Plus One, especially about Scully. Yet we learn even more about the show itself. We learn that it can still be creepy. That it's willing to walk back some of the mistakes of the past. That it's still able to cobble together a creative and creepy story. Even that it's still struggling with tone, and whether it should take itself seriously or not.

Were this season as short as the last, it might be a bit worrisome. But with a full ten episodes for season eleven, it feels as if the show is right back on track. This little detour to the "bread and butter" of The X-Files was pleasing overall. Not perfect, but creepy enough, and unique enough, to keep us coming back for more.

Feel free to leave your comments on the episode below — and tell us if you sleep with your back to the door.


WhatCulture.com

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 7:25

The X-Files: Plus One – the evil that exists in all of us

by Susan Leighton
1 minute ago
Follow @SusanontheLedge

Are doppelgangers real or are they figments of our imaginations? Does evil truly exist or is it just the manifestation of our own darkness? Last night’s X-Files episode “Plus One” explores the answers to those questions.

“Time to get back to our bread and butter.” – Fox Mulder

**SPOILER ALERT**

Back to Weirdness



Last night’s episode was like a pair of comfortable slippers. This was what the X-Files were all about in the original series. Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) together investigating cases that took them into dark areas and down strange paths.

Plus One was like a trip back in time and harkens back to some of their better efforts from the 90s like “Pusher.” In the very first scene which takes place in a mosh pit at a dive club, Arkie Seavers (Jared Ager-Foster) is having a great time grooving to his favorite band.

Out of the blue, his doppelganger appears. That good night he is having is about to get seriously rough. Spooked and who wouldn’t be after confronting a malevolent version of yourself, Arkie escapes in his pickup truck. Only in the middle of his ride home, the doppelganger appears again.

This time, he succeeds in veering off the road and hitting a tree leaving Arkie battered and bruised. It’s about to get weirder. Enter Mulder and Scully who are eager to get back to what they do best, investigating creepy cases.

Think back to “Squeeze” and “The Host,” although this isn’t the typical monster of the week fare, it is still what made the X-Files great. The unexplained phenomenon and the quest for answers keeps the audience on their toes.

What Mulder and Scully discover is something far stranger than mass hysteria culminating in suicides. Instead, they find that the doppelganger generator might in fact be originating from someone’s mind.

After speaking with Arkie in jail, the duo visits the scene of his accident where they prove that he didn’t wreck his car, someone else or something else did. This explains how he survived and didn’t die like the other victims.

Wanna Play a Game?



In the course of doing research on their case, Mulder and Scully talk with Dr. Babsi Russel (Denise Dowse). She tells them that she has seen a rash of less than upstanding citizens claim to see their doppelgangers and then became mentally ill.

She introduces them to Judy Poundstone (Karin Konoval). By all appearances and actions, Judy is demure and prone to acting like a little girl. Mulder becomes transfixed by the different Hangman drawings on her wall.

Oddly enough, he comes upon one with Arkie’s name on it. He questions her about it and she replies that she plays telepathically with her brother. After the two agents depart, Judy returns to drawing in her notebook.

It turns out that she is adding a sad face to Arkie’s hangman figure.

Meanwhile, at the jail, Arkie finds out that he is being mysteriously transferred. He is left alone in a holding cell so of course, what an opportune time for his doppelganger to appear.

The Evil Twin



Mulder and Scully are inquiring about getting a room for the night. Since they have no reservations, the only one available requires that they possibly sleep together. Scully seems more apprehensive about it than Mulder who clearly by the look on his face is entertaining thoughts of getting closer, perhaps.

However, both end up sleeping alone and Scully is abruptly awakened by Mulder who tells her that Arkie is dead. When they get to the jail, they notice the trustee who is recounting the scene to the police. Arkie’s lawyer, Dean Cavalier (Benjamin Wilkinson) is demanding answers and thinking that it is a murder.

Scully explains how Arkie hung himself with a belt. However, Mulder believes that something supernatural is at play. After leaving the jail, Mulder takes off to visit Judy’s brother, Chucky. When Chucky answers his door Mulder immediately recognizes him as the trustee from the jail.

The Demons Inside Us



It starts to make sense to Fox what is going on. He and Chucky have a rather unpleasant exchange but Mulder finds out that he is Judy’s twin and that there is an invisible entity that only he can see.

On the other hand, Scully is visiting Judy who is experiencing her “demonic” phase. Flinging around food known as Dookie, Scully starts asking her questions about Arkie. In turn, much like Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs, Judy pokes at chinks in Scully’s armor by reminding her that she is older and dried up.

Although Scully acts like it doesn’t get to her, the impact of Judy’s words hit home. Before Scully leaves, Judy lets it slip that Arkie killed himself. Now, Scully believes that there is something more than mental illness going on and it could be a possible psychic transference.

What she is about to find out is that even she and Mulder are not immune to facing their doppelgangers and demons mentally and physically.

The Moments We Have All Been Waiting For

This should be a very special episode for the X-Files shippers. There are several touching scenes involving the duo. After her visit with Judy, Scully is pondering her age and getting older. Mulder dissuades her fears by telling her that she has it “going on and she still has some scoot in her boot.”

There is another touching moment between the two. We get to see Scully show her vulnerable side. The interaction between Mulder and Scully is the best they have had since the time when Mulder called her his touchstone.

When Scully talks about aging and what the future might have in store for them, it is almost unbearable. You feel a deep sense of regret from her at the way things turned out between her and Mulder. She even laments what if he finds someone younger to have children with to which Mulder asks if she wants another child.

You get the feeling that this pair has unresolved moments between them that will be explored at some point within this series. Hopefully, they will find closure.

The Verdict

The consensus of critics on the net is that this was a C+ episode. I am going out on a limb and saying I disagree. This script was one of the purest returns to the original series than even the Were-Monster in season 10.

There were many different levels going on with this episode. Of course, the obvious story line of tracking down the cause of mysterious deaths. Then there is the idea of doppelgangers or actually the demons inside us that can kill us plus relevancy of our lives as we age.

Chris Carter has managed to weave together complex ideas that Kevin Hooks’ masterful direction was able to materialize. David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson made us realize why we love their characters.

Karin Konoval is a powerhouse talent that was extremely convincing in both of her roles. Actually, you could say she played three roles if you count “Demon” Judy!



If this is the last season of the X-Files and this is an indicator of future episodes, I can honestly say that for me, it will be a fitting end to a legendary television show.


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 7:42


Courtesy of Fox

The X-Files Just Aired Its 'Shippiest Episode Ever, And We Feel Heard

By Kimberly Roots / January 17 2018, 5:59 PM PST

Need to catch up? Check out the previous X-Files recap here. 

It’s ironic that last week’s episode of The X-Files was titled “This,” because that’s my exact response to the show’s most recent hour.

This.

THIS.

This is what my X-phile ‘shipping heart has longed for all through nine seasons of television, one pretty good movie, one incredibly bad movie and two seasons of revival: Mulder and Scully, spooning in bed, talking about their future and acknowledging that they’ve had Biblical knowledge of each other. (And if you come at me with “That kinda happened in I Want to Believe,” I will crack you over the head with one of those snow-poking sticks.)

Though I liked Season 10 more than most TV journalists, the emotional distance between Scully and Mulder at its outset irked me. Even if you weren’t looking for clues that the agents cared for each other in the early seasons (though, as I’ve said before, if their attraction wasn’t clear by “Irresistible,” what show were you watching?), can’t we all agree that having a kid together/surviving an Antarctic alien event together/drinking a snowglobe to stay alive bonds a couple in lifelong ways?

Anyway, this week’s hour, “Plus One,” delivers in a way reminiscent of “Leonard Betts.” It offers a quirky, funny monster-of-the-week, the investigation of which illuminates something new about Mr. and Mrs. Spooky. It includes some original-flavor Mulder and Scully banter. And as a bonus for us romantics, the most elusive of all X-Files phenomena: ACTUAL sex!

My heart is full. Read on for a recap of the episode.

SEEING DOUBLE | In a small concert hall, we watch a chucklehead-looking dude drink straight out of a bottle, hop up on stage where a punk band is playing, then stage dive into the crowd. But his euphoria crashes when he sees what looks like an identical copy of himself glaring at him from the back of the venue.

The kid follows his double outside and hops in his truck, but his double suddenly appears there, grabbing the wheel and spinning the vehicle until it smacks into a tree. Chucklehead goes through the windshield, and it looks real bad, but he doesn’t die. The evil twin? Nowhere to be found.

HANG ON | The case piques Mulder’s interest, and as he briefs Scully on it in their basement office at the FBI, she’s — shocker! — skeptical about the guy’s account of a nefarious doppelganger. But other people in the guy’s Virginia county have died after describing similarly disturbing self-sightings, and the idea of a mass phenomenon is enough for Scully to get in the car and accompany her partner south.

But once they meet the guy, Arkie Seavers, Scully’s about to brush it all off — he’s got six DUIs, after all — but a local doctor draws her back in by describing how a bunch of people in the area were part of what seemed like a schizophrenic outbreak. And when Mulder notices that a schizophrenic patient in the hospital’s psych ward has covered her walls with pages of the hangman game, he asks to investigate.



Mulder and Scully meet the woman, Judy (played by Mrs. Peacock herself, Karin Konoval!), who claims that she plays the game telepathically with her brother. Mulder notices that Arkie’s name is the subject of one of her hangman matches, but Judy says she doesn’t know him… “but she might,” she says ominously, pointing to an empty chair in the corner. (Side note: Anyone catch titles of past episodes in some of the unfinished games hanging on Judy’s wall? I saw “Chinga” and “Firewalker.” Holler in the comments if you noticed others.)
Later that night, Mulder wakes Scully up in their shared hotel suite (though not their shared bed — he’s on the couch): Arkie is dead, having hanged himself in jail.

SCULLY’S DEMONS SURFACE | Arkie’s lawyer, Dean, is incensed: The young man wasn’t suicidal, he insists, and he was handcuffed when he died. And though we know that Arkie’s twin appeared in the cell before he kicked the bucket, Sculder doesn’t have that info. So Mulder goes to question the next person on their suspect list: Judy’s brother, Chucky, a trustee who works at the jail where Arkie died (and who’s also played by Mrs. Peacock herself, Karin Konoval!)



Chucky is a total weirdo hoarder who hates Mulder on site (mostly because the townie is sweet on “that tasty little redhead” Scully), and confirms that he and Judy are twins. He’s got hangman games strung up all over his place, too. Oh, and he also references a man who’s allegedly in the room… though Mulder can’t see him.

Meanwhile, Scully visits Judy, who’s had one of the wild shifts in personality that the doctor warned her about. Mean Judy is fond of flinging Dookie — the brand name of a chocolate pudding that looks a whole lot like poo (and because I am 5 years old, ha!) — at anyone who happens to enter her room. “We call her Demon Judy,” says one of the nurses who refuses to accompany Scully when she questions Demon Judy.

As predicted, the nasty Demon Judy launches lots of Dookie at Scully and lets on that she’s got the hots for Mulder: “What’s he see in you, your handsome partner? One taste of little Judy, and he’d forget you even exist. Maybe I can make you go away, too.” (This will prove important later.) Then she starts goading Scully for being old and infertile, “not even half a woman.”

BOOT SCOOT SCULLY | Demon Judy’s words stain Scully worse than the pudding; when Mulder knocks on the door of their adjoining room later that night, she’s clearly ruminating on the harsh comments. “Mulder, do you think of me as old?” she asks, and when he’s incredulous, she says, “A woman thinks about these things.” He assures her that, “No, Scully, you still got it goin’ on. You still got some scoot in your boot,” and that seems to make her feel better. (Side note: There is nothing I don’t love about this exchange, including how chic-ly unbuttoned both agents look, how Mulder’s gaze is so unflinchingly adoring even though his words of comfort are so clunkily and unequivocally MULDER (#SuperstarsOfTheSuperBowl4eva), and how amused Scully looks as she gently bats him back to his own room.)

Elsewhere, Chucky and Judy play another round telepathically. This time, the name they’re going for is Dean, AKA Arkie’s lawyer, who’s managed to tick off Chucky by referring to Arkie’s death as “supernatural.” Whatever, dude.



SHE IS ME | The next day, Good Judy is back when Scully visits, and she admits that Demon Judy has the power to affect people’s deaths. Good Judy protects herself, she confides in Scully, by taking some special pills. She pulls a handful of them in a napkin from her bra, then gives them to Scully. In the hallway, the nurses clue Scully in: The “special pills” are just bread that Judy rolls into pill form. Dana is about to throw them away when the RNs say that they take the pills, too, “in case they have secret power. You might want to take them, too.”

Lawyer Dean is about to eat a meal at the general store when he sees a stern-looking version of himself standing outside on the street. He finds the FBI agents at their hotel and asks for help, but Scully tells him he’s only making his condition worse by being so paranoid. “It can’t haunt you if you don’t let it,” she advises him, telling him to go home and lay low for a while. He leaves, and Mulder and Scully debate the existence of evil and the Devil. “If you eliminate the impossible, whatever is remaining, even if improbable, is the truth,” she says flatly. Mulder’s quippy retort: “No sugar, Sherlock.”

Dean tries to suicide-proof his home, but it’s no good: His evil twin shows up and uses a blade from the lawyer’s sword collection to chop his dead off. “For the record, I have to say it’s not outside the realm of possibility” that he decapitated himself, Scully says when she and Mulder survey the crime scene, but she seems less certain than before. And then outside Dean’s house, Scully sees a frowny version of herself standing amidst a crowd of onlookers. Uh-oh.

THE GOOD PART | Back at the hotel, a spooked Scully wakes up and makes her way to stand near Mulder’s bed. “Something about this case is getting under my skin,” she admits, and then utters a line that is straight out of 3,000 pieces of fan fiction, but I’m not mad about it: “Can you hold me?” Mulder seems surprised but not unhappy as he says, “Yeah, I can do that,” and he spoons her like it’s Bellefleur, Ore., circa 1992.

“What’s gonna happen… when we’re old?” she wonders as they lie together. “What do you mean, ‘when’?” he jokes, but she’s a little teary as she wonders, “Are we gonna spend time together?” and “What if you meet someone? What if you meet someone younger who wants to have kids?” He remarks that she could do the same, which leads to a discussion about how she would’ve liked another child, but she’s “at the end of that journey,” and anyway, “Mulder, sometimes I think the world is going to hell and we’re the only two people who can save it.” Then they talk about what would happen if they lost their jobs, and after a little silence, she concludes, “We’ll think of something.” Then she turns to face him and smiles… but that’s likely because she doesn’t see that Evil Scully is standing a few feet away.

Later, Mulder gets up to get a drink from the bathroom faucet, leaving a sheet-covered Scully sleeping in the bed. Then he sees an evil version of himself and freaks out, urging Scully to “put a dimmer on that afterglow” — !!! — and get to the hospital before they hang us both.” Scully sits up and WAIT GUYS GUYS WAIT SHE’S CLEARLY NAKED AND SHE WASN’T BEFORE AND I SHOULD PROBABLY NOT BE THIS EXCITED BUT THE HEART WANTS WHAT IT WANTS. Ahem. Scully reminds him that the twins can only hurt them if they panic, but Mulder’s not hearing it. “How many letters in ‘Scully,’ Scully?” he cries on his way out the door.

THE HANGMAN BECOMES THE HANGED | As Chuck and Judy argue telepathically over which agent to kill, Scully sees her evil twin appear in the backseat but calmly tells it that it may be evil, but its certainly not real. It disappears. (Might that be because Scully downed those bread pills like I down… well, bread?)

Over at Chucky’s place, Mulder’s not so lucky: His evil twin beats the Dookie out of him, finishing by turning a bookcase over on the G-man. But in the end, the twins wind up killing each other via a particularly killer game of hangman: Scully finds Judy strangled/hanged in her hospital room, and Mulder (once he recovers) finds Chucky strangled/hanged on the floor at his house. He also finds hangman games with the names “Mom” and “Dad,” which all but verifies that the twins killed their folks, too.

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS IN A NONDESCRIPT MOTEL | Back at the hotel, a knackered Mulder tells Scully he’s going to sleep for a few hours before checkout, and “If you need anything, call me.” She’s putting on quite the easy-breezy act, saying, “I can’t imagine that I will” as he closes the door between their rooms behind him. “But then again, it’s not out of the realm of extreme possibility,” she says to herself with a little smile. And when she opens the door, Mulder is standing right there with a knowing look on his face.

Now it’s your turn. What did you think of the episode? Hit the comments and let us know!


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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 7:45



17 Jan 2018

The X-Files: "Plus One" Review

By Matt Fowler

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.

"Talk about flinging dookie."

Whereas last week's X-Files chapter was a trippy, quasi-meta thriller with tenuous ties to background mythology, "Plus One" was a return to basics - with creator Chris Carter crafting a "spooky lethal circumstance of the week"-type tale about nutso twins who cause people to mysterious die at the hands of their own doppelgänger.

Sure, there were a few things to lament here and there. One wishes Scully's perpetual skepticism could be updated a bit to reflect the breadth of all she's experienced over the course of the series, and the actual hows and whys of the murders seemed to get swept under a big rug by the time our heroes began seeing their own shadowy killer doubles - but all in all this episode was solid.

The biggest saving grace here, elevating "Plus One" up and out of a typical standalone, was the soft and graceful motel bed scene between Mulder and Scully right at the top of the third act. It almost worked to replace the parts of the episode that might have been devoted to further explaining Judy and Chucky's special powers. It's as if a time out was taken in order to show us these agents, particularly Scully, reflecting back on their lives, the affection they have for one another (that they've never been able to clearly define, but still feel), and their prospects for a hazy future.

If one were looking for signs that Season 11 is The X-Files' final hurrah (also taking into account Gillian Anderson's desire to be done with the series), this moment was a notable dog ear. The two gracefully aging agents were able to, essentially, put a pause on one of their routine-ish investigations - with Mulder even acknowledging that they'd faced down crazier phenomena in the past - and connect in a meaningful way ("Put a dimmer on that afterglow."). "Plus One" wasn't tethered to any of the "My Struggle" chapters except perhaps through Scully's realization that things are coming to a close. They'll probably get fired, or killed, and there were things she wanted to do that she never had the chance to - have another child, perhaps be with Mulder in a more stable/loving way, etc.

The scene worked because Anderson and Duchovny were very present and seemed to realize, themselves, that the end was near. And as fun as the case was - sort of a Final Destination plot (oh yes, there were random swords) where, unfortunately, the named victims couldn't weasel their way out of certain doom - this was the show almost tenderly calling out the faint futility of these types of cases, which almost always seem to implode on themselves. Mulder and Scully did very little here except show up and bare witness to deaths. Their presence alone caused the twins to crumble under a tantrum of jealousy and "hangman" each other.

9 X-Files Appearances by Stars Before They Were Famous
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It was a very '90s X-Files case (Mulder dryly insisting "I wouldn't rule out ghosts" now comes off unintentionally cheeky though), including the gimmick of having actress Karin Konoval play both the brother and sister (along with their split personalities). Konoval, in turn, was a fun Easter egg herself, having starred in iconic past episodes of the show such as "Clyde Bruckman’s Final Repose" and - *gulp* - "Home." Yup, those wild eyes are unforgettable. Especially the death mask expressions of both Judy and Chucky right at the end.

The Verdict

"Plus One" was a mostly self-contained story that harmlessly harkened back to X-Files chapters of the past, but underneath it all was a running current containing our heroes' doubts and insecurities about times ahead. It was a nice mix of creepy old casework and newfound perspective.


IGN

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Re: 11x03 - Plus One

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jan - 7:54



[TV Review] “The X-Files” 11.03: ‘Plus One’ is the First Satisfying Episode

by Daniel Kurland
January 17, 2018

“The X-Files” puts murderous doppelgangers on its radar and delivers the first really satisfying episode of the season

“The dude looked just like me…”


One of the greatest assets to a show like The X-Files is its ability to turn out episodic installments of one-off terror. The beauty of monster of the week episodes is that they allow a greater degree of variety and freedom for the show. These endeavors often result in some of the show’s most creative, memorable episodes. At the end of the day, it’s entries like “The Post-Modern Prometheus”, “Bad Blood”, “Clyde Bruckman’s Final Repose”, “X-COPS”, and “Improbable” (how dare you deny this episode’s brilliance) that are the installments that fill up “Top Ten” lists and are viewers’ favorite installments. The first two episodes of this season have been very much caught up in the series’ ornate history and the relationships of its characters, but “Plus One” gets down to brass tacks, (mostly) sheds its baggage, and delivers a scary, inventive monster of the week episode that finally feels like vintage X-Files. This would also, without a doubt, be Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s favorite episode of The X-Files. So it’s also got that going for it.

Right from the cold open of “Plus One,” this episode works hard to get the audience’s attention. This introduction is set at a rave where a guy goes insane after he sees a doppelganger of himself amongst the crowd. This is a simple, yet effective way to begin the episode and it feels like the first real cold open of the season. People forget that The X-Files was known for its surprising, addictive introductory scenes and it’s easy to lose sight of small things like that after a show gets so big. “Plus One” re-captures that mysterious energy and it’s written by Chris “Alien DNA” Carter, no less. This follows that classic setup where there are random people and something scary happens to them. This is also proof that Carter should stick to the monster of the week stuff because he gets it here.

The X-Files sometimes works too hard to come up with an idea that’s overly complicated. Something as “basic” as mirror versions of people killing their doubles is brilliant, frightening stuff that doesn’t try to re-invent the wheel. Something of this nature is also exactly the sort of thing that should have been the season’s second episode. This entry is so much stronger than “This” and allowing some space between the season’s premiere and the somewhat mythology connected “This” would have been a smart decision.

The episode’s opening credits phrase doubles up “The Truth Is Out There” in a cute little nod, but more than anything this feels like proof that every episode this season will try to have fun and subvert the credits phrase in some way. I think this ultimately cheapens the significance of when the phrase is different, but this is a minor complaint. So far it hasn’t wrecked the premise, but let’s see where this goes.



The whole doppelganger homicide situation turns out to be a mass phenomenon that’s going on all over the world. The specifics of all of this point to a particular form of schizophrenia where the subjects suffer from seeing a double of themselves. Scully even ventures that this could be some sort of mass hysteria. However, the individual from the cold open is the only case where the victim hasn’t died in their doppelganger altercation. Mulder and Scully “get back to their bread and butter” and hit the case.

Mulder and Scully’s journey leads them to Judy, a peculiar schizophrenia case that they’re especially interested in. Judy turns into a helpful key to figure all of this out, but then Scully meets her other half, Demon Judy. Enough said. When the suspect dies from what appears to be strangulation when he was alone in his cell, Mulder and Scully get increasingly suspicious of Judy and her possibly prophetic abilities.

“Plus One” gleefully plays into the horror aspect of all of this and gets away with it for the most part. The sequence where the victim’s double appears to him in his jail cell and he’s unable to escape is absolutely chilling. Furthermore, Scully and Mulder’s doubles also stand out in unsettling ways. Carter and director Kevin Hooks do a great job at mining the horror from this psychological concept whereas the previous two entries never quite get there. Part of the fun of The X-Files is that sometimes the show is flat out terrifying and it’s nice to see “Plus One” get back to that place.

The Demon Judy material is also disturbing stuff and the episode isn’t afraid to highlight this. Director Kevin Hooks gets to briefly shift into a mild Exorcist impression and it’s a nice scene where Scully gets to play off of a psycho. On that note, this episode’s portrayal of Scully isn’t just better than what goes down in the season’s first two episodes, it’s actually good. She’s in charge and pushes the story forward and is just as important to Mulder this time, if not more so. Maybe Carter doesn’t hate Anderson after all.



As Scully deals with Judy and her alter ego in her attempt to crack the psychological angle of the case, Mulder deals with Chuck Poundstone and his alter ego for these killings. It turns out that Poundstone and Judy are actually playing some sort of mental hangman game with each other and have been in communication the whole time. Both of their performances are so over the top and exaggerated, but it does help sell these absurd characters. Carter has a flair for his one-off characters to sometimes be heightened weirdoes and this is one of those circumstances.

“Plus One” also curiously circles back to Mulder and Scully’s romantic situation and their likelihood—or rather the lack thereof—of the two of them having more children. This episode also seems to confirm that they are no longer an item, which feels like a misstep, especially when this season is centered around finding their child. This meditation on the future doesn’t exactly connect to the rest of the material, but it’s satisfying to see this worthwhile, methodical discussion be had between the two of them. It’s at least better than making their relationship completely void of any romantic connection, which has been the case in the past.

“Plus One” is ultimately a bit of a more encouraging installment that plays with some interesting ideas, refocuses on Mulder and Scully’s relationship in a crucial way, and almost re-empowers Scully. It also points out how similar Mulder and Scully’s names are when playing a game of hangman. It seems like the current iteration of the show works best when it plays into extremes, like deep horror in this case, or exaggerated comedy elsewhere. Middling efforts that fall in between or nondescript sci-fi and conspiracy offerings just won’t hold up in the end, but more episodes like this one will always deliver. Once more it’s baffling that the writer of this episode can be the same person behind the “My Struggle” trilogy. Carter knows how to tell a story, but it’s just better when it’s an inconsequential one rather than the story.



“The X-Files’ ” 11th season will continue Wednesdays at 8pm (ET) on FOX




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