The House of David Duchovny [Forum]
Hello,

To access the forum, you must have registered,
then to access the entire forum you must have introduced yourself.

Looking forward to post with you.

11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

Go down

11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 16 Nov - 2:36




Last edited by jade1013 on Thu 15 Feb - 5:22; edited 2 times in total

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by Duchovny on Thu 16 Nov - 6:21

thanks
avatar
Duchovny
Phantom
Phantom

Number of posts : 17132
Age : 60
Localisation : Bologna - Italy
Emploi : Housewife
Your favorite David's role : Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2011-01-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Sun 19 Nov - 2:34


canaidan

Mixed feelings about looking old enough to play mid-level law enforcement figures. Got to #chill all day with @albert.nicholas and @garrett_black on #set of a #show we can’t #talk about.

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

11x08

Post by jade1013 on Sun 26 Nov - 9:06


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 29 Nov - 2:34

SEASON 11: THE X-FILES Fox Mulder & Dana Scully (David Duchovny & Gillian Anderson) in Vancouver

By Susan Gittins November 28, 2017 


Fox Mulder and Dana Scully belong together. They looked so good tonight. Like their FBI agents of old: Mulder in an overcoat and suit; Scully with her red hair bobbed.

David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson were both on set tonight in Vancouver filming Mulder and Scully talking to a woman at her house. I watched them film long takes on the porch.





By the time they wrapped a small crowd had formed. David Duchovny walked straight out. Gillian Anderson asked to be shielded from photographers with an umbrella.

The X-Files season 11 premieres in the new year on January 3rd.





_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 29 Nov - 13:48



_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 30 Nov - 9:48



_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Fri 1 Dec - 10:42



_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Fri 2 Mar - 6:14

'Nothing Lasts Forever' Promo Photos Released

   By Keva Andersen
   On February 24, 2018


FOX has shared new promo photos from "Nothing Lasts Forever" which will air as episode 9 on Wednesday, March 14th. After looking at them, that feels like a really really long time to wait to get answers about this church scene.

In the episode, Mulder and Scully uncover a mysterious cult that is "consumed with macabre rituals" while investigating human organ theft. Karen Nielsen wrote the episode and it was directed by James Wong.

Check out the images below and join us in flailing.



X-Files News

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 8 Mar - 8:20




Preview: Necessary To Defeat Evil | Season 11 Ep. 9 | THE X-FILES

The X-Files
Publicado em 7 de mar de 2018

Catch a brand new episode of THE X-FILES next WED at 8/7c only on FOX!

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Tue 13 Mar - 8:55

The X-Files exclusive clip: Mulder really needs glasses

Kelly Connolly March 13, 2018 AT 10:54 AM EDT



Everything old is new again: Fox Mulder’s glasses are back.

In this exclusive clip from Wednesday’s episode of The X-Files, Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) investigate the site of what appears to be an organ-harvesting operation. But when Mulder — who hasn’t worn glasses since the early years of the original series — slips on a pair of specs to check out missing organs on his phone, Scully finds she’s more interested in his new look than she is in a stolen liver.

“Are those new?” she asks. “Bifocals?”

The partners banter about glasses and other signs of aging until Scully is yelling about gout to a pair of indifferent agents on the other side of the room, but that isn’t the best part of the exchange. Check out the clip above to see what secrets Mulder’s glasses unlock. Just don’t call them bifocals.

The X-Files airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET on Fox.


EW.com

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Tue 13 Mar - 10:37

Let This Exclusive X-Files Sneak Peek Seriously Creep You Out

By Sadie Gennis | Mar 13, 2018 11:43 AM EDT



f you thought to yourself, "How is The X-Files ever going to follow-up something as terrifying as Mr. Chuckle Teeth?" we now have the answer and it involves organ theft, a cult and Justified's Jere Burns.

In this exclusive sneak peek of Wednesday's episode, we see some seriously gross footage of a pair of doctors cranking open a corpse's chest in order to harvest his heart and lungs. It becomes clear this isn't your typical medical procedure when one of the doctors decides to check if the pancreas is infected by licking the damn thing! (The religious woman hunting the doctors on the roof doesn't bode well for the professionalism of this procedure either.)

If this clip makes you squeamish, then you're going to want to brace yourself for the full episode, which finds Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) following the organ trail (not to be confused with the classic CD-ROM game The Oregon Trail) to a cult lead by a pair of killers (Burns, Altered Carbon's Fiona Vroom) who leech life off their harem of followers — a process often achieved through particularly gruesome means.

The X-Files airs Wednesdays at 8/7c on Fox.


TV Guide

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Tue 13 Mar - 21:33

The X-Files Gets Ritualistic In This Exclusive Clip

An exclusive sneak peek at this week’s episode of The X-Files paints a dark picture of the black market for human organs.



Michael Ahr
Mar 13, 2018

In “Nothing Lasts Forever,” The X-Files will drag Mulder and Scully into the shady world of human organ trafficking, but to all appearances, the rabbit hole goes much deeper than the conventional urban legend about such illicit practices. As is usual with this show, there’s bound to be a fantastical angle that places the crime in the FBI’s X-Files department, and this exclusive clip shows how the underground surgeries tilt towards the ritualistic.

In this particular scene, a hooded crusader, likely the character billed as “La Avispa” (The Wasp) played by Carlena Britch, attacks the surgeons performing the illegal harvesting. Watch as she brutally murders those she encounters, shouting, “Those who love me, I will deliver!” and asking “Where are they?” Although it’s unclear what or who “they” are, her attack on those doing wrong could be vigilantism, revenge, or something much darker.



“Nothing Lasts Forever” is directed by The X-Files regular James Wong and is written by Karen Nielsen, who is turning in her first solo script after serving as script coordinator on both reboot seasons. The episode synopsis reads, “While investigating human organ theft, Mulder and Scully uncover a mysterious cult consumed with macabre rituals.” Is the mysterious woman in this sneak peek part of the cult or working against it?

Be sure to catch this undoubtedly creepy episode of The X-Files Wednesday night, March 14, 2018 at 8/7c on FOX.


Den of Geek US

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 14 Mar - 8:08

'The X-Files' Episode 9: Mulder & Scully's 'Reputation' Precedes Them (VIDEO)

Samantha Lear March 14, 2018 9:45 am


Shane Harvey/FOX
Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny in the "Nothing Lasts Forever"

Some of the questions surrounding The X-Files' core mythology will be addressed soon, as the show is nearing the conclusion of this second 10-episode installment—just not this week.

Though Season 11 Episode 9, titled "Nothing Lasts Forever," is technically the penultimate episode of the season—one week until the finale!—this will be a standalone hour. But don't worry, it'll still have plenty to unpack as Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) investigate a human organ theft, only to uncover a shocking and secretive cult.

We also hear the episode features some interesting conversations between the two about their own relationship, which you won't want to miss!

In an exclusive clip from the ep, we see the partners checking in on this new case and running into a little resistance from the local authorities. That only lasts for a moment, however, as Mulder manages to prove his abilities in a matter of seconds.

Watch the full preview below:



The X-Files, Wednesdays, 8/7c, Fox


TVInsider

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by Duchovny on Wed 14 Mar - 12:40

thanks
avatar
Duchovny
Phantom
Phantom

Number of posts : 17132
Age : 60
Localisation : Bologna - Italy
Emploi : Housewife
Your favorite David's role : Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2011-01-20

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 14 Mar - 18:25

March 14, 2018 6:00pm PT by Marisa Roffman

'The X-Files': What Did Scully Whisper to Mulder?


Shane Harvey/FOX

"When you’re used to having that playful banter with someone, when they’re suddenly honest, it takes you aback," episode writer Karen Nielsen says. "It’s, ‘Oh, we’re actually going to have a real conversation about this.’ Sometimes those things can be scary."

[This story contains spoilers from the March 14 episode of The X-Files.]

When first-time The X-Files scribe Karen Nielsen wrote Wednesday’s episode, “Nothing Lasts Forever,” she set out to tell a character-based piece.

“I wanted to have some character moments with Mulder and Scully — that was super important to me,” says Nielsen. “I thought it would be interesting to have Scully reflecting on her religion. My sister is very Catholic, and I’m not. So I liked the dynamic of Scully being very Catholic and Mulder not; I related to that.”

What Nielsen didn’t know at the time was that her episode would shift back one to become the penultimate episode of the season and potentially the series as a whole. Wednesday's episode revolved around a cult led by a former actress (Fiona Vroom) who was obsessed with maintaining their youth and the woman (Carlena Britch) trying to save her sister from them. The installment also could be the last “monster of the week” episode the iconic series does with its core team intact as star Gillian Anderson has said this will be her final year playing Scully.

“The pressure that society puts on women to be perfect, to be beautiful is intense, because we’re such a consumerism society that we have to prey off of women’s insecurity to sell, sell, sell,” Nielsen says. The writer, who doubles as the show's script coordinator, also made sure the female characters were well-rounded and the episode also featured an inclusive cast. “Especially in Hollywood, you’re a write-off after 30. That pressure is quadrupled as an actress. That was a horrible and wonderful rabbit hole to go down [in writing]: having an actress try to hold on to her youth and obtaining that.”


Shane Harvey/FOX

Nielsen credits longtime X-Files writers James Wong (who directed the hour) and Glen Morgan with being the genesis of Scully’s (Gillian Anderson) religious origin story in the episode. When Scully was younger, her brother was sick, and her mother asked the family to pray for him. The first few days, a young Scully asked for a puppy … which she got shortly after her brother recovered. “It was the architecture of Jim and Glen knowing this character for so long, and seeing the things that she should be coming from,” she says, calling the duo her “dream team” collaborators. Morgan was also the one to suggest they have a visual callback to the mysterious coin Scully’s mother had on her when she died last season.

The hour ended up being pivotal for Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully, whose relationship has grown increasingly murky. The dynamic duo’s partnership was always complicated during the original run of the series: after years of closeness, they slept together in season seven — a move that appeared to be responsible for the conception of Scully’s son, William — but due to outside forces (and Duchovny’s increased absence from the franchise) they were never properly a couple. The second feature film, The X-Files: I Want to Believe, found the two living together, away from the FBI life, but there was obvious tension in the relationship as they worked the movie’s case; they were broken up by the 2016 television revival.

However, they appeared to potentially reconcile early in season 11, when they slept together and arranged a couple of dates. But in true Mulder and Scully fashion, they simply seemed to be existing together (they still reside in separate homes, for instance) versus actively engaging the shift in their relationship and what it could mean. But Scully took a step forward to break them out of their standstill in the final scene of the episode: when Mulder mentioned they were good together, she simply asked, “Are we together?”

“To me it was about having a honest moment,” Nielsen says, acknowledging the open conversation between the two was part of why the episode moved directly pre-finale. “We need to be real, we need to be honest, we need to start saying something. They’ve gone through so many emotional things with their son, coming back to the X-Files and things not going so smoothly. And [also] coming back to the relationship, because they were away from it for so long; to see where that relationship sits now. It’s exhausting not being honest when you get to that stage. To be true to these characters, you had to have a true moment. It’s what those characters needed.”

But what was it that Scully needs? "I don’t know if any God is listening, but I am standing right here,” Mulder told his partner. “And I am listening. Right besides you, all ears. That’s my choice.” She paused, looked around at the empty church, before whispering her hope for her future in his ear. “That’s not my four-year-old self looking for a miracle,” she said. “That’s my leap of faith forward. And I’d like to do it together.”

The audience is in the dark about Scully’s request during the hour, intentionally. “That’s between Mulder and Scully,” Nielsen notes. “Having those private moments, it’s important for any couple.” And it won’t be revealed going forward, either: “It’ll always be between Mulder and Scully,” she says with a laugh. “It’s not for anyone else. That was their moment.” (Chalk it up to another unsolved mystery, a la the duo’s Christmas gifts to each other.)


Shane Harvey/FOX
 
With that exact sentiment remaining unspoken, it was essential the tone be handled correctly while filming the scene. “It’s just [them] being honest with each other,” Nielsen notes. “When you’re used to having that playful banter with someone, when they’re suddenly honest, it takes you aback. It’s, ‘Oh, we’re actually going to have a real conversation about this.’ Sometimes those things can be scary. It was something from the heart, which can be terrifying for her to do, especially given how much she’s been through and how much her heart has been broken, especially this season. That’s where I wanted it to come from: her vulnerability.”

And, yes, in Nielsen’s mind, Mulder and Scully are meant to be together. “I feel like they’re each other’s soul mates and they know it,” she says. “They get in each other’s way, they’re complicated, they both have reasons why they hold back. They both have reasons they need each other. That’s why they’ve had such an up and down relationship: it’s not as easy as saying, ‘I like you, let’s make this work.’ The world they live in just doesn’t allow for that. Their love for each other, mind and body, makes them go, ‘There’s nobody else.’ There are so many moments you see them, they look at each other, and just from a look, [it’s] no one will get me like you do. That’s my personal take on it: they’re soul mates.”

What do you think Scully whispered to Mulder?



_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 14 Mar - 20:02

The X-Files 11.9 Review – “Nothing Lasts Forever”

March 14, 2018 | Posted by Wednesday Lee Friday



7.5 The 411 Rating
7.5 Community Grade

When I heard the dulcet tone of Tad O’Malley, I was sure I was gonna see me some Joel McHale this week. But no. If I want to see him, I guess I’ll just have to head over to the Netflix for that National Lampoon movie. The real story this week is all about vampire cults, religious revenge, and a few folks who seem sad not to be born with a Daisy and Violet Hilton mishap. Spoilers for “Nothing Lasts Forever” follow.

We begin with an operation that…after a minute…doesn’t look like they’re actually trying to save anyone. We see a rib spreader, a casual atmosphere in general, and then a couple of murders. Why would someone have a gun at the ready in an operating room? Why does that operating room look so dark and crappy? Why would a doctor lick a pancreas? Eeeew. Enter some religious whispering, half-assed interrogation, and a spike through the chest and it’s clear from the get-go that someone in this episode has a vampire problem.



One of the ongoing paradoxes of The X-Files is that Scully, the apparent non-believer, is a believer in the usual context—in that she has an imaginary friend in the sky whom she occasionally worships. This week, the show pays special attention to transubstantiation of the Eucharist—the magic trick wherein wafers and wine become the body and blood of Christ before being devoured to spiritually nourish a congregation of believers. Wait—which ones are the vampires again? We have to wonder how Scully’s prayers have changed since the first time we saw her pray—all the way back in season one.

One of the focal characters this week is Juliet, who is doing violence in the name of religion. But for once, the person doing this is not a delusional nut. There actually is an evil to fight, and even though she’s bloody and shaking, she’s going to do it. Juliet also has a mother who cries and prays over her missing daughter, who has some sort of “deformity.” The other main focal character is Barbara Beaumont, who has been acting since the days of Spanky, Darla, and Alfalfa. For you youngsters, that’s a long time. Barbara is vain, selfish, and thinks far too much of her limited and undecorated career. There’s also a Doctor Luvinas, who has a few weird quirks of his own. Barbara and Luvinas enjoy watching her old TV shows, and Luvinas has a chick stitched to his back. Gross.



Media references abound this week: Little Rascals, Sonny and Cher, Dragnet (or was it Adam 12?), and Charo (how many of you even know who that is—coochie coochie?) all got a mention. We also learned that Mulder is a Hammer horror fan, because of course he is! Amid these mentions is a story of a cult of ageless vampires who steal or kill to feast on organs and blood—calling it “dinnie,” which they really shouldn’t. But that’s just the kind of cloying, babyish nickname a woman like Barbara would give her murderous meal tendencies. This isn’t one of those rich, sexy vampire cults (though there is clearly plenty of writhing nakedness happening), more like the dirty, ugly, cult that looks more like a heroin flophouse than a troupe of like-minded folk living the dream. Barbara seeks out kids with flaws, handicaps, deformities, and promises them prettiness in exchange for whatever it takes to feed her appetites. This works out well for Barbie B, since she thrives on adoration in addition to blood. What does every actor want, after all? An audience.

I laughed out loud when Barbara treated the sacrifice to a song sung by her. Mostly, I laughed because it was the same song sung by the Succubus in an episode of “South Park.” There’s got to be a morning after. Kind of an absurd thing for a sun-fearing vampire to sing about. Meanwhile, Juliet does all she can to find Olivia so her mom will do something other than pray and cry for her lost daughter.



Watch for the fun conversation about how Scully came to believe in God in the first place. It’s about her brother, prayers for recovery, and puppies. Mulder never found religion because his parents never bought him a puppy. Not because of alien abduction, his kidnapped sister, or a lifetime of obsession with the unknown. No…it was clearly the lack of a puppy Mulder. LOL Speaking of funny Mulder stuff, his insistence that his new bi-focals are “progressives” is hilarious, and not at all uncommon. One a word gets too associated with old people, it gets changed so the people using it can pretend they aren’t old. That’s why Metamucil (Fibre One), walkers (stabilizers), emphysema (COPD), incontinence (leakage), and dizziness (vertigo) all go by other names now too. Does Scully really believe in God? Unlikely. But many people find comfort in ritual and symbolism.

Eventually Olivia, the missing sister of the avenging Juliet, is chosen to get stitched onto the good Doctor Luvinas. Around this same time, Mulder and Scully show up to question Barbara, whom they expect to look like the 85-year-old woman she is. Before they can figure it all out, they’re both attacked by the vampire cult members and Scully is throw down the dumb waiter, or some other sort of very long chute. Like most places vampires live, the building is huge and old and filled with passages and hidden stuff. Saving the day, Juliet shows up and stakes Barbara. Because chicks named Barb never live through horror stories. In the end, Juliet realizes that she’ll go to prison for what she did. Her faith is so strong though, that she accepts her Earthly fate because she believes a better one awaits her after death. Wow. Nice work if you can get it, right? We’re left with her mother, whose daughter has returned home. Not much has changed though, as she sits at the same table saying the same prayers…this time for her other daughter. Sad times.



Like every other episode this season, we did also get a slam on the Republican standard of “smaller government.” As Doc Lavinas reveals his hideous relationship to Olivia, he opines on how much better life would be if we were all free from the regulations that keep docs from sewing people together. #HumanCentipede I enjoy these asides because I agree with them. If I didn’t though, I’d probably find them annoying and off-putting.

The end of the episode is more meaningful in a lasting way, as Scully contemplates whether or not she’s “out of miracles.” Is there a difference between a prayer candle and wishing on a birthday cake? Are Mulder and Scully the perfect harmonious blend of reason and faith? If so, which one is reason, and which faith? Mulder is the one who “always faces North,” according to Scully, and she’s not wrong. Scully has a request for Mulder, and we don’t get to hear what it is. It’s a leap of faith forward, whatever it is. It occasions Mulder to say, “I always wondered how this was going to end.” So do we, dammit.



I’m convinced that next week represents the end of Fox and Dana’s wacky adventures. But it has seemed like the end so many times, it might be foolish to think this is it. So long as the Cigarette-Smoking Man is alive, he’ll be engaged in chicanery—yes, even after we think we saw his skull on fire. Skinner will always fight the good fight, and Reyes will always look out for herself. I can’t even begin to guess what will happen next week, but whatever it is, it’s gonna be big.

See you’s next week!

7.5
The final score: review Good
The 411
As we near the end of this 11th (and almost certainly final) season of The X-Files, we're given reminders of what's at stake before the end. Where is William? Will Scully be reunited with her son? Will Mulder find out his fatherhood was usurped by one of the most immoral men on the planet? Fans want to know if Mulder and Scully will run away together like Hannibal and Clarice (or Hannibal and Gillian Anderson for that matter). I just want Jeffrey Spender to have a long and happy life…which isn't likely. Oh, and this week there was an organ-stealing vampire cult led by a failed Little Rascals actress.


411MANIA

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Wed 14 Mar - 20:20




A Mysterious Woman Looks For A Heart | Season 11 Ep. 9 | THE X-FILES

The X-Files
Publicado em 14 de mar de 2018

A mysterious woman looks for a missing heart.

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 7:10

The X-Files recap: 'Nothing Lasts Forever'


Shane Harvey/FOX

Kelly Connolly March 14, 2018 AT 09:00 PM EDT

We gave it a B+

The X-Files has a history of ending more than once a season. The finale is for the mythology, sure, but the penultimate episode is for everything else: the annual last stand of the weirder, more romantic side of the show. These episodes tend to salute the series as a whole: Mulder gets three wishes from a genie (in season 7’s “Je Souhaite”) and discovers that he and Scully are already doing the work to make the world a better place; a man with extraordinary powers uses them to live in the Brady Bunch home (in season 9’s “Sunshine Days”) because TV characters are his only family.

Looking back, most of season 11 has embodied the nostalgic, tongue-in-cheek, how-are-we-still-doing-this spirit of a penultimate hour. What’s left for the actual second-to-last episode to do but dial that spirit up to 11, douse it in blood, and call it “Nothing Lasts Forever”? It’s surprising that this episode was filmed eighth in the season and only recently swapped with last week’s “Familiar,” because “Nothing Lasts Forever” is a penultimate episode of The X-Files to the extreme. All of this season’s big ideas are here: living with the consequences of our choices, finding lost children, aging on television. It might be too much, and it might be too bloody, and one character’s story never lands the way it should. It’s a messy hour.

But I loved it. I loved its wry sense of humor (“Did you get your hair cut?) and the sad glamour of Mark Snow’s piano-heavy score. I loved Fiona Vroom’s performance as an Old Hollywood darling who wants the magic back, screaming at her followers from beneath two layers of velvet. I loved the way the madness tapered into such an intimate ending. “Nothing Lasts Forever” is a Frankensteinian mash-up of stories this show hasn’t told well in the past: the organ harvesting of I Want to Believe, the gory quest for eternal youth of season 4’s “Sanguinarium,” the, well, blood-sucking quest for eternal youth of season 2’s “3.” But toss in Catholic overtones and a literal cult of TV revival, and you get something almost cohesive: a bizarre Gothic romance about cheating death. Call it the “Post-Post-Modern Prometheus.”

It helps that Mulder and Scully are given so much time to just talk to each other, even before that long-overdue conversation in the church. The agents invite themselves to the scene of a grisly crime: A man is killed, his organs harvested, and his pancreas licked by one of the surgeons. And then that surgeon is killed, along with the guy who planned to deliver the organs, by a young woman who spouts Bible verses before she stakes them, like some kind of Catholic Avenger. Yet in the midst of a case that feels, in Mulder’s words, like a Hammer Horror film, the X-Files duo would rather talk about Mulder’s new glasses and annoy the other suits in the room. Scully tends to play straight man to Mulder’s out-there theorizing, but tonight, she and Mulder together are the straight man, two ordinary people looking in on a very strange world.

The partners head from the crime scene straight to a church, where Scully lights two prayer candles and tells Mulder she’s going to need some time. This is how the original series usually approached Scully’s Catholicism — slowly at first, then all at once, then not at all, then all at once again — but her renewed devotion to the rituals of her faith makes sense now that she knows her son is out there on his own. (The church is named St. Joseph’s, after another man with a miracle son.) Joining Mulder, who waits in the pews like a dutiful spouse, Scully pulls out the necklace her mother had on her when she died and explains that she’s looking for strength. Margaret Scully found it in faith. Where does Mulder find it? “I need what you have,” Scully says. “You always bear north, Mulder.”

Scully doesn’t know if she believes in miracles, but she believes in belief and what it’s done for the people around her. On The X-Files, the most honest state of being is to want to believe but have doubts; it’s when faith is wholehearted that it’s the most dangerous. Our Catholic Avenger is proof of that. A devout believer whose sister Olivia just up and joined a cult, Juliet isn’t content to sit back and pray for her sister’s return. She tells the priest that “prayers are not enough” and quotes Deuteronomy 32:42 at him like it justifies her actions: “I will make mine arrows drunk with blood.” In every line she quotes from the Bible, Juliet puts herself in God’s place. For someone who’s so upset that her sister has chosen to worship at the altar of youth and beauty, Juliet has a false idol all her own: herself. She literally fashions the church (its fence) into her weapon.

It isn’t clear if we’re meant to feel bad for her. There’s nothing appealing about Juliet’s single-mindedness; she’s never made to question herself or suffer for her choices. Her last words are the righteous claim that she’ll be rewarded for her actions in Heaven. As Mulder tells Scully, “All any of us have are the results of all the choices that we’ve made, and at the end of the day we just hope that we made the right ones.” Juliet’s hope doesn’t inherently make her choices right. Nothing in her own belief system backs up her actions, but this episode doesn’t engage with that tension — it just flattens her into a comic book character who could really use more catchphrases. (“I did repay,” she declares seconds after killing someone, like a short-circuiting computer program.) She’s clearly meant to be a warning about the radicalization of faith, but why Juliet specifically, and also, how? How did she come by this very particular set of skills? (Next: Loved you on Dragnet)

While everyone else is starring in The X-Files by way of Mary Shelley, Juliet and her family are in a backdoor pilot for The CW’s next superhero drama. Olivia’s reasons for running off and drinking blood come down to a drawer full of beauty supplies and a picture that indicates she once had bad skin. (She’s also smiling crookedly, but her smile and her skin seem perfectly traditionally pretty in the photos that line the wall.) The details we are given are just specific enough to raise more questions: Juliet says Olivia sees their family as “monsters,” and in a card to her sister, Olivia explains that she’s leaving because she can’t stay and watch them both turn into their mother. What’s so monstrous about this family? The drive to bring a child home could have made a poignant parallel to Mulder and Scully’s situation, but with so many over-the-top plot holes, it just feels empty.

Not to endorse this cult, but it makes for better television. Olivia’s cult of choice is a vampiric commune devoted to one Barbara Bay Beaumont, a former actress who literally hasn’t seen the light of day in decades. Lack of sunlight helps keep Barb lookin’ young, but she also swears by the blood-and-organ smoothies she drinks every day (her “dinney,” she calls them), and really, dears, don’t sleep on the occasional benefits of surgically attaching a young person to your back, either. (Heterochronic parabiosis is a real thing that has been done to mice, and I do not recommend extensive Googling.) Barbara and her partner in crime, Dr. Luvenis (Jere Burns), have amassed a following of attractive young people who all believe they weren’t attractive until they started drinking internal organs, and they’re all willing to die so the woman who made them beautiful, and thus happy, can live forever.

These are the ways to aim for eternity as defined by The X-Files. There’s the hope that you can live on through someone else (an approach taken not only by Barbara’s devotees but by Scully, who in the season 5 premiere decided to give her cancer “meaning” by saving Mulder’s career). There’s religion: The first place we find Scully in this episode is at Mass, receiving communion (“whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life,” the priest recites), while back at the cult, Barbara cuts her followers’ hands like the stigmata and drinks their blood. But there’s also TV: the eternity of life in reruns and the hope of a revival. This is my favorite theme of the hour, a playfully meta jab at what The X-Files has been up to and a sobering reminder that it can’t last.

Barbara still watches her pride and joy, The Barbara Beaumont Show, every chance she gets, reciting the lines right along with her past self, who doesn’t look a day younger. Beauty is a goal all its own for some of her disciples, but for Barbara, it’s wrapped up in something bigger: her desire to stay relevant in an industry that prides youth and good looks above all, discarding women in particular when they pass a certain age. (It’s worth noting that a woman, Karen Nielsen, wrote this episode, and as expected, The X-Files is reaping the benefit of bringing in more perspectives.) When she meets Scully, Barbara passes judgment on her skin like she’s doing her a favor. But her attempt to recapture the past traps her in it: She can’t go outside, can’t even act in anything without giving away that she doesn’t exactly look 85 years old.

That is, until the whole world catches on to Dr. Luvenis’ methods and aging stops being a problem for anyone. There are hints that Barbara’s dream is to revive her show: She tells the good doctor that she’s reciting old episodes as “prep” (“I have to memorize my lines”). It isn’t enough to recall the glory days — Barbara wants to bring them back. The signs aren’t in her favor: When she sings for her followers, the tune she picks is a disaster movie’s theme song. “The Morning After,” from 1972’s The Poseidon Adventure, is so bad at being optimistic that its original title was “Why Must There Be a Morning After?” The song was tweaked to something cheerier, but its hopefulness sounds forced; if you’re living in a disaster movie, do you want life to go on? (Fun aside: The Poseidon Adventure was filmed in part aboard the RMS Queen Mary, just like season 6’s “Triangle,” another story about living in the past.) “Nothing Lasts Forever,” the title reminds us, and in most cases, that’s for our own good.

Still, Barbara presses on. Mulder and Scully find her apartment via the old tracker-in-the-stolen-organs trick, and she lets them in because she’s dying for a new audience. She practically begs the partners to recognize her, listing her credits until Mulder offers, as if reading from a script, “Loved you on Dragnet.” (Barbara’s delighted response, “Did you know Jack Webb?” leads to a great David Duchovny deadpan: “I did not.”) Scully persists, asking if Barbara has seen Olivia, and Barbara screams her head off when she gets a look at the girl’s picture. The jig is up. (Next: Oh, Juliet’s still in this?)

As if on cue, the cult pounces on Mulder and Scully, tossing Scully down a four-story dumbwaiter shaft and leaving Mulder so distracted by his partner’s fate that when Juliet rushes in and stabs Barbara in the heart, he lets her get away. Juliet finds Luvenis, now surgically attached to Olivia, in the basement and knocks him on the back of the head with a sledgehammer. And before you know it, Olivia is safe at home, suffering no ill effects from her stint as an 85-year-old man’s personal nutrient sponge. It’s everyone’s lucky day (except Mrs. Bocanegra): Decades of trash broke Scully’s fall, so the only damage done is to the smell of her clothes.

But there are other consequences. Juliet goes to jail, and Scully goes back to church, where she and Mulder ease their way into a conversation that’s been coming for two seasons: defining the relationship. How refreshing is it to hear Scully finally ask, “Are we together?” exactly the question I’ve been asking of them for the past nine episodes? They spent the night and then hesitated to share a hotel room; they slept together but it didn’t fix them. Mulder’s home was “our home,” and then Scully had a smart home because it was cool. And all of these fumbling dinner dates and contradictions are suddenly rendered coherent, or at the very least real, by Scully’s confusion. How can we know what Mulder and Scully are if they don’t?

“I believed we could protect our son and I failed,” Scully admits. “I believed that we could live together and I fled. I gave up on that too.” Mulder counters that maybe she should have fled earlier; he still imagines the life she could have had if she left the basement before he needed glasses. (He was wearing glasses when they met, but he’s being poetic.) “You’d have your health, your dog, your sister,” Mulder envisions. “You’d be Kersh’s boss at the FBI and be married to some brain surgeon and have a bunch of kids that you wouldn’t have to give up.” This isn’t the first time Mulder has wished a different life for her, and Scully, who once told him she wouldn’t change a day, reassures him again here: “I don’t begrudge you any of that.”

Scully doesn’t regret what she lost working with Mulder; she regrets what she chose to give up on her own. In a story about accepting consequences, the only choices Mulder and Scully can’t rationalize are the ones they didn’t make together. Their relationship is the antidote to doubt: When one of Scully’s prayer candles goes out and she jokes that she’s all out of miracles, Mulder vows, “I will relight your candle and extend your prayers through mine.” Juliet strangled her faith by taking it of context, but Scully describes prayer as conversation: not a child’s one-sided wish but something shared.

Earlier, Scully remembered the experience that made her believe in God: Her younger brother Charlie came down with rheumatic fever, and her mother asked the kids to pray. Now, when Mulder reminds Scully that his choice is to stand beside her and hear what she has to say — to, basically, hold up his half of the conversation — she leans in and whispers in his ear, then pulls back. “That’s not my 4-year-old self looking for a miracle,” she says. “That’s my leap of faith forward, and I’d like to do it together.” Scully doesn’t know if she believes in miracles, but she believes in this two-person prayer.

There’s no way to tell what Scully whispers to Mulder. She might be saying “William” at the end, maybe even “find William,” but maybe not — I like the privacy of it, which the angle of the camera is designed to protect. If Scully’s words are setting up a finale twist, we’ll find out soon enough, but for now, it’s enough to know that she wants them to take the next step together. I wanted this episode to end with that whisper; I almost want the show to end there, on a truth only Mulder and Scully get to know. But Mulder’s response adds intriguing tension: “I’ve always wondered how this was going to end.” This forward leap, whatever it is, is final. The end is beginning. The same feels true for The X-Files: Despite the fact that next week’s episode is only being billed as a season finale, Gillian Anderson says this is where the curtain falls, and “Nothing Lasts Forever” is on her side. A TV show shouldn’t last so long that it has to stay out of the sunlight in order to exist.

Open files:

  • Tad O’Malley makes a radio cameo this week. Stop trying to make chemtrails happen, Tad.
  • I wonder what Moby-Dick-inspired name little Scully gave her puppy.
  • If Barbara is 85 and her husband of 22 years died in 1970, wouldn’t that mean she got married at, what, 15 or 16?
  • Barbara lives in apartment 4D, also the name of the season 9 episode about parallel universes.
  • Luvenis: Latin for “young man”
  • “Love-niss. Lu-veh-niss. Lu-vee-niss.”
  • “My gut doesn’t need glasses.”
  • “I remember Dylan. He wouldn’t shut up. I’m glad we ATE him.”
  • “Is she a Netflix executive?”


EW.com

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 16:35

‘The X-Files’ Review: The Grossest Episode of Season 11 Reminds Us That ‘Nothing Lasts Forever’

The penultimate installment of what could be the last season of "The X-Files" ever does manage to make some time for Mulder and Scully.

Liz Shannon Miller
Mar 14, 2018 9:00 pm
@lizlet


Shane Harvey/FOX

[Editor’s note: Spoilers for “The X-Files” Season 11 Episode 9, “Nothing Lasts Forever,” follow.]

Previously, on “The X-Files”…


Agents Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) solve weird crimes for the FBI, and a big part of their partnership is that Scully believes in God (and is a practicing Catholic). Meanwhile, Mulder believes in aliens, Scully, and not much else.

This Week’s Dossier


Somebody’s harvesting organs for non-organ-donation purposes, and Mulder and Scully are on the case to figure out why — but there’s really not much mystery to it after we get introduced to the wacky cult created by former film and TV star Barbara Beaumont (Fiona Vroom, whose goofy performance is one of the episode’s biggest positives), who is working with Dr. Luvenis (Jere Burns) to use the organs of their cult underlings to give themselves eternal beauty and life. (And hey, it seems to be working, given that Barbara’s in her 70s and Dr. Luvenis is 85.)

Mulder and Scully aren’t the only ones trying to track down this cult, though — there’s also Juliet (Carlena Britch), whose sister joined the cult, and whom Juliet is determined to rescue (while also jabbing stakes cut from the fence of her local church through the bodies of those working to harvest the organs). The final bloody confrontation results in both Barbara and Dr. Luvenis dead, and Juliet reunited with her sister and totally okay with how she’s probably going to jail for murder, because she feels like she did the right thing in God’s eyes.

The episode ends with Mulder and Scully lighting candles in church, Scully whispering something inaudible in Mulder’s ear, followed by “that’s my leap of faith forward, and I’d like to do it together.”
“I always wondered how this was going to end,” he says in reply and lights another candle.



Wait, Explain It to Me Like I’m Five


Ewwwwwwww. Also, Mulder and Scully have a conversation about faith and their relationship…we think?

Makeout Watch


There are two types of “X-Files” fans: the ones who don’t ever want to see Mulder and Scully together as a couple and the ones who spent the last scene of the episode screaming “JUST KISS ALREADY!” at their screens.

Either way you go, this sort of vague conversation is all too familiar to longtime viewers, though a little less tolerable this time because next week is the season finale, which promises to be pretty chaotic. If this was Mulder and Scully’s last chance to have a real one-on-one conversation about their lives and what they mean to each other, we would have appreciated a little more specificity.

Still, we choose to read those final moments as relatively optimistic for them and for the future.

Some Deep and Relevant Thoughts About Hair


“Did you get a haircut?” It took Mulder getting new glasses to notice something that’s been blindingly obvious to all of us for the last three episodes. Per the production numbers, “Nothing Lasts Forever” was originally supposed to be the eighth episode of the season, not the ninth, so it’d really only have been two weeks of him not noticing, not three. But while it’s such a believably male moment for him not to have noticed, it was also a little silly. Scully’s reaction in this instance was, in fact, perfect: “Are you kidding me?”

Nostalgia Alert!


Speaking of Mulder’s glasses — look, back in the 1990s, there used to be entire WEBSITES devoted to David Duchovny wearing glasses (Exhibit A). They are no longer operational (rest in peace, Geocities) but making a big deal about Mulder’s new frames sure did tickle those old memories.

That said… sometimes we get overly nitpicky with these reviews, but this honestly feels like something we can’t overlook. “You can’t know how many times I imagined a scenario where you left that basement office before I ever needed glasses?” Mulder, for God’s sake, you were wearing glasses the very first time you met! Seriously, let’s go to the tape:



We get it, the glasses in “Nothing Lasts Forever” represent the fact that Mulder is aging, the point of the line really has nothing to do with that. But it’d still be nice if the show’s relationship with continuity was slightly more consistent.

But It’s Not 1993 Anymore


Last week, we observed that there’s no way “The X-Files” would have gotten away with shooting a man point-blank in the head during its original run. This week stands out in a similar regard, as the blenders full of human organs and general revelry in viscera is a reminder that thanks to 1990s-era Standards and Practices, “The X-Files” had to be a lot more circumspect with how it handled guts and gore.

Of course, there was no shortage of gross-out moments during the original seasons, but there was a little more restraint back then, and given how many times “Nothing Lasts Forever” nearly made us gag, we honestly miss it a little bit.



Fun Ultra-Nerd Fact


Cults have always been a reliable well for storytelling on this show — easily half a dozen episodes from the original seasons focused around some creepy group worshipping something arcane — and the concept of aging, or avoidance thereof, is also a theme that’s been explored frequently.

Also, this isn’t the first time Mulder’s told Scully that she smells bad. He really knows how to woo the ladies.

“I’m not going to ask you if you just said what I think you just said, because I know it’s what you just said.” (Most Awkward Quote)

“I remember Dylan. He wouldn’t shut up. I’m glad we ate him.”
— Barbara

Much of the dialogue in this episode was really solid, and Barbara was especially fun at certain points, whether it was singing “There’s Got To Be a Morning After” as the soundtrack for a disemboweling or asking Scully if a missing girl was a Netflix executive. But look, we get it you guys are cannibals and super-gross about eating organs and whatnot. Would a euphemism or two kill you? When you have us craving the subtlety of “Santa Clarita Diet,” that is a bad thing.



“Dear Diary: Today my heart leapt when Agent Scully suggested ‘spontaneous human combustion.'” (Best Quote)

“I finally know why I’m not a Christian, Scully. My parents never got me a puppy.”
— Mulder

Many of Mulder and Scully’s breakout scenes were solid thanks to Anderson and Duchovny’s enduring chemistry, but this particular line in that particular conversation about faith was a charming and light moment for both characters.

Final Report


While incredibly gross, the early scenes of this episode were really well-directed by James Wong, including some strong visual transitions that had us taking notice. Unfortunately, on a story level “Nothing Lasts Forever” came together only via some pretty clumsy moves. As just one example, the entire plotline about Dr. Luvenis stealing a heart that Mulder and Scully had planted a tracker on was brushed over with a few lines of dialogue and felt like a pretty desperate last-second rewrite to smooth other some production issue.

That said, if choices like that were made so that we could have more screen time devoted to character-focused scenes (featuring both the good guys and the bad), it’s a sacrifice we can learn to live with. “Nothing Lasts Forever” was a pretty on-the-nose title, but one worth letting rattle around in our brains this week, as we prepare for the season finale, and whatever might come then.

Grade: B-



IndieWire

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 16:40

The X-Files: The Secrets of Nothing Lasts Forever

We talk with the writer of “Nothing Lasts Forever” about its powerful themes of beauty, religion, and body horror.



Daniel Kurland
Mar 14, 2018

The X-Files season 11 has had an interesting journey, but as it begins to come to a close it appears to be ending on a strong note. The past few episodes have all been impressive, with many of evoking that vintage X-Files feeling that many viewers felt was absent from season 10. The show’s current season makes the wise decision to not burden its second to last episode with its cumbersome mythology. Instead, it is a delicate episode that plays into cults and obsession in disturbing ways.

“Nothing Lasts Forever” highlights some highly deranged individuals, but the decisions and belief systems that bring them to this point are more upsetting than any monster or senseless killer. The problems that get addressed are very real and even though this episode pushes it all to the extreme, its relevance make it all the eerier. We got the opportunity to talk to Karen Nielsen, the writer of “Nothing Lasts Forever,” about penning her first X-Files episode, the powerful themes it explores, and where she’d like to take Mulder and Scully next.

DEN OF GEEK: To begin with, what is it about these topics of artificial beauty and cult mentalities that interests you?

KAREN NIELSEN: I think being alone in society you just feel the pressures of appearance. We live in such a consumerist society and everything is just about how we look because that's how we can prey on people's insecurities and sell things. I'm susceptible to it just like the majority of people—not just women, but people—are in the world. And if you're a woman and an actress it's like quadruple all of that. If you're over thirty you almost become a write-off, which is horrible. So I can definitely relate to what the episode says about being judged and not feeling good enough to be worthy of love. Of course none of that stuff has any merit towards your ability to be loved. In the episode, Olivia has a family and she's loved, but for some reason it just wasn't enough. A lot of people feel that way and no matter how much love you have, you're still going to feel like it's not enough. All the hate will get through and that's a major problem in society, so why not play around with that?

How did all of the pieces of this episode come together? Did you start with the cult aspect, the aging stuff, or what?

I live in Canada, so I wasn't exactly apart of the writers' room. So for me it was a lot of conversations with different people about what i wanted to do and say with this episode. I'm a very character-driven writer, so I came from the place I wanted to say with them. So it was important for me to have character moments between Mulder and Scully, so that's sort of where I came from and what I wanted to do. I also wanted to have three-dimensional diverse female characters and make them layered and more interesting.

On top of those things, I also knew that I wanted to explore Scully's religion, too. I have a very Catholic sister, but I'm not religious at all. So that always fascinates me about you can still be very close with someone, but have this very different belief. Mulder and Scully obviously have that relationship. So when I wanted to touch on Scully's religion in that respect, Glen [Morgan] brought up the angle of cults because they're sort of like a really messed up religion. That's where it started from, where Glen came in with the angle and I came it from character. Then you mix in a little James Wong and some American Horror Story for good measure and you get something special.

There’s almost a Twilight Zone quality to this story where there’s this aging starlet who never wants to lose her youth or relevancy. Was that show an influence to you at all with this episode? Was there anything else that was an influence here?

I think The Twilight Zone is always going to inevitably be an influence on The X-Files because it was such a brilliant iconic show in this genre and we all love it. I personally am a huge fan of The Walking Dead and because it's such a character-driven show and about the journey and the people, there might be a little of that in there. It's all about the characters. It's about these women and what they're fighting for as opposed to the plot.

Everyone's fighting for something and that's why people are more of an influence to me than other shows. People are fascinating and society is fascinating and I try to explore a little of all of that.

On that note, this is obviously an extreme episode, but did you find any news stories or real life examples of anything like what the Luvenises were doing here?

Yeah! Glen brought Humanism to my attention and that's a huge thing. It's where people will take other people's blood to make them healthier and younger. It's weird! Most people just do a blood in an IV sort of situation, but then there are of course people that take it to a whole other extreme. To me, that's what's so cool about The X-Files because usually the episodes are rooted in something from reality.

I was a big fan of Glen Morgan’s underseen Intruders series, which I know that you worked on as a script coordinator. I saw a lot of parallels between this episode and that show in terms of this idea of living forever through others.

Oh interesting! I hadn't even thought of that, but you're totally right! It's such a fascinating concept though, right? It's something that everyone can relate to on some level. People generally don't want to die.

Juliet is a really fascinating character through all of this. Talk a little on the lore that her character believes in, her use of that metal stake, and where her head is at through all of this.

She's a true believer. She takes that stake from the church and it's almost like it's holy water to her. She's doing everything through God's word. She wants to save her sister, even if that means sacrificing herself. She's ready to give into the greater good. Family—and saving her family—is the most important thing for her. It's so interesting because she's a true believer in the same way that the cult followers are.

And the same way that Scully is.

Exactly. They all take extremes, but they all just want to be loved. True believers are interesting.

Especially on a show like this. You really lucked out with the fact that the show was able to get Jere Burns to play Dr. Luvenis. Did you have any input in who you wanted to play the role? How did Jere’s casting come about?

We have an amazing casting team and they brought forward so many great people it was almost like, "How do you choose!" But I've been a fan of Jere Burns' forever, so he was a big want, especially for such a twisted role. He's not afraid to run the risk of humorous the character can be and he just completely got it. It's so amazing when that happens because it just confirms that the casting was meant to be. Nobody can connect with the character more than the writer and the actor, so it was cool to share that bond with him.

One of the things about this season that I’ve been really curious about is how the “TRUTH IS OUT THERE” message in each episode is something different. Were you told to change the message, or did you just have the opportunity to do so if you wanted?

I just think that when it happened in the first few episodes of this season, we all got excited about it and just ran with it. So yeah, it wasn't forced on us, but it was a cool opportunity that most of us took advantage of. That's so cool that you noticed it. I think they're a fun little peek behind the scenes.

For sure. They're always a great little extra. Lastly, you're relatively new to The X-Files. Do you have any other story ideas or topics of interest that you'd like to dig into in a future episode of yours?

Definitely. I mean, I love the monster-of-the-week stuff the most. I love the whole "nothing is what it seems" aspect of The X-Files, so I would love to explore that side of it more through a monster-of-the-week character. I would love to do a Close Encounters thing. I know that Darin [Morgan] did a really funny one, but I would love to do a real, honest "let's meet an alien" kind of thing—where’s he's not trying to kill everyone. I would love to do an episode from an alien's POV. That's what I think would be cool.

The X-Files Season 11 will conclude next Wednesday at 8pm (ET) on FOX


Den of Geek US

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 16:43

The X-Files Season 11 Episode 9 Review: Nothing Lasts Forever

A monster-of-the-week leaves some big questions on the table in the latest episode of The X-Files.



Chris Longo
Mar 15, 2018

This X-Files review contains spoilers.

The X-Files Season 11 Episode 9


For a show that continues to evade the cold grip of television’s grim reaper, The X-Files to its credit has been pleasantly self-aware this season. The show was pumped with an infusion of fresh blood, giving new, diverse voices a chance to write and direct, while the old guard of the franchise maintained that X-Files look and feel that fans longtime fans demand. What could be the show’s penultimate episode is a perfect distillation of what went right in the show’s eleventh season.

Written by Karen Nielsen (a script coordinator on the show who is penning her first solo episode) and directed by X-Files vet James Wong, “Nothing Lasts Forever” is a nod to the futile quest to outrun death and perhaps a cheeky ode to the show’s own pending fate. In this case, outrunning death for the central characters of this monster-of-the-week episode means taking life (and organs) from others. The cold open begins with an organ harvest with a twist, as a vigilante disrupts the operation process and murders a thief in cold blood. It was one of the more captivating cold opens of the season, one that could easily be a cool opening of a feature film.

The episode was far from a thriller, though. It’s more of a character study. Stealing the episode away from Mulder and Scully is Dr. Randolph Luvenis (Jere Burns), who has some ideas on the science of reverse aging. His patient, a former ‘60s sitcom star Barbara Beaumont (Fiona Vroom), is an 80-something-year-old woman who doesn’t look a day over 30. What’s their secret? They drink blood and organ smoothies of the downtrodden youth they convince to join their cult. And if they really need a pick-me-up, they surgically attach a youth to their backside. This is why The X-Files props/wardrobe department is one of the best in the biz.

Praying on the vulnerable, Luvenis and Beaumont created a cult that promises an “ascension.” The young cult members, the ugly ducks, hope to become as beautiful as Luvenis and Beaumont. Much of the episode is spent in the dark, creepy basement apartment where Vroom literally and figuratively puts on a dazzling performance. She deserves to be up there with some of the great antagonists in the series’ monster-of-the-week canon.

Other than a commentary on our society’s sick obsession with beauty, the episode effectively questions the choices we make in this one and only life we have. At the center of it is Scully’s faith and her questioning why they continue to let their lives take a backseat to their work on the X-Files. As great as this episode is, and this season as a whole, there does come a time when everyone needs closure. Regardless of what happens in next week’s finale, it feels like we got that from Nielsen and Wong. I’ll admit I screamed and clapped a bit when Scully leaned in for the whisper, wondering, hoping, and praying that right there in the church the lovebirds could work it all out.

Mulder may not believe in God, but he always believes in Scully. Reason in faith and harmony is why they’ll eventually end up together, even if the episode tells us that a previous attempt failed and it was Scully who fled. In an episode about overcoming your past and making sacrifices for the people you love, it was the small character moments that make us wish this show could last forever. It can’t and it won’t, but with “Nothing Lasts Forever” we could at least savor it for a little bit longer.

4.5/5


Den of Geek

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 16:48

The X-Files Review: The Truth Has Abandoned Us

(Episode 11.09)

By Dom Sinacola  |  March 14, 2018  |  9:00pm
Photo: Shane Harvey/FOX



When did we get here, or has The X-Files always been like this? Mulder (David Duchovny) and Scully (Gillian Anderson) show up at a crime scene a reasonably proximal distance from Washington, D.C., refute all jurisdictional complaints care of whoever happens to have gotten to the scene first, make clear what their reputation entails when Scully notices something on the body missed by the original investigators (while Mulder lists a series of supernatural or conspiratorial anecdotes), more people die, the agents discover what’s going on but not without preventing the perpetrator from suffering a violent or painful death, everyone who would have died without Mulder and Scully there ends up dying with them there, the agents share a moment of introspection about aging and the paths their lives have taken, about what “it” all circuitously means in this, the Trump Era, and they leave, on to the next case they’ll barely crack to no evident effect. As The X-Files lumbers into what could be its final episode, the X-Files themselves seem more and more a relic of a government (a world) that no longer exists—or worse: that no longer matters. Mulder and Scully’s life’s work has become a budgeting anomaly, too inexpensive to raise a red flag within the bureaucratic bowels of the FBI, but too inconsequential to do much of substance anymore.

This week, like much of their conversation in “Plus One,” Mulder and Scully confront the fragility of their corporeal realities, this time prompted by Mulder needing to use “transition lenses” because he can’t read his phone screen anymore. Of course, these universal human fears correspond well to the agents’ latest case, which has partly to do with black market organ harvesting and partly to do with a teenage girl, Juliet (Carlena Britch), who becomes a vigilante for God in order to take down the cult behind the organ harvesting, which also happens to count her sister as one of its members. It’s an odd hybridization of Monster of the Week plotlines writer Karen Nielsen assembles, alloying all the disparate pieces and themes under the banner of exploring “faith,” at least to the extent that Scully has it via her Christian upbringing, and Mulder isn’t sure what he has, though he does offer an explanation about how maybe life is the culmination of one’s choices, and faith is trusting that we’ve made the right choices? Scully seems to accept this nonsense, because The X-Files has pretty much given up on explaining how someone who’s seen everything Scully’s seen, who has experienced so much of the pointless tragedy Scully has, would still ally with an organized religion as dogmatically inflexible as Catholicism. And because Mulder wants to believe, even if he’s not sure what he’s supposed to be believing anymore, now that he’s done believing in the so-called “truth.”

In fact, with so much happening in this episode, Mulder and Scully are barely in it. Instead, Nielsen lays out whole episodes unto themselves, each necessarily underdeveloped because there’s only so much one can do in 45 minutes. The cult surrounding the underground organ harvest bows to ’60s sitcom actress Barbara Beaumont (Fiona Vroom), who, despite being a septuagenarian, looks exactly as she did on TV decades ago thanks to the cannibalistic “treatment” devised by her mad scientist husband, Dr. Luvenis (Jere Burns). The cult itself isn’t grounded with much of an explanation besides how those who belong to the cult, including Juliet’s sister, serve as living vessels for continuous blood transfusion or act as foot soldiers, finding victims for Barbara’s eventual consumption. According to some quick expository detective-ing on Mulder and Scully’s part, Barbara Beaumont left the public eye some 40 years earlier, hiding out on the top floor of a Bronx building she owns, using a system of tunnels and elevators and dumbwaiters to pay the building’s super and otherwise get what she needs. How does she recruit? Why would any person actually join this cult? How could they go 40-plus years basically keeping a group of young people living in such conditions, involved with murder regularly, without any law enforcement whatsoever showing up at her door? Rather than background or world-building, “Nothing Last Forever” provides some seriously stomach-churning prosthetic effects, making for the most upsettingly violent and grotesque The X-Files episode since the last one.

Juliet, convinced God has called upon her to free her sister from the cult and repay all the damage to which her sister’s contributed, goes full-on Buffy, using the sharp ends of metal bars stolen from the cast-iron fence surrounding her church to slay bad guys like so many vampires. Her martial arts prowess seems formidable—she’s able to take down gun-toting heavies as well as nourishment-deprived cult members—but we never understand why that is, or from where her abilities stem. (A short scene of her training could have helped, at least.) Whether Mulder and Scully unintentionally led Juliet to Barbara Beaumont’s cult HQ or not, Juliet shows up and takes climactic action, killing everybody who you already assumed would die, a surprise massacre which also saves her sister’s life when, most likely, Mulder wouldn’t have been able to. Similar to the end of The Passion of Joan of Arc or to the part where the Boondock Saints drop a toilet on a guys’ head, Juliet’s admission of her tenuous legal standing does not account for all the superheroic things she was able to accomplish. Mulder and Scully don’t follow up on this line of questioning, though Juliet is arguably an X-File all on her own.

Ostensibly, the season’s penultimate episode gives Mulder the chance to say, “I always wondered how this would end,” when Scully whispers into his ear what she really wants out of this life they’ve built together, whatever term you want to use to describe it. It looks as if she mouths the word “William,” the Chekhov’s gun of the season, who will undoubtedly make an appearance in the finale, shooting off his brain powers to confirm that this whole season occurs in an alternate dimension from Season 10, or that Season 10 was all a dream, or that Mulder and Scully have been plugged into the computer database described in “This” and so have been living out the archetypal X-Files episode these past couple months, or something along those lines.

That Mulder and Scully have been living in an all-encompassing simulacrum since the world-ending catastrophe of “My Struggle II” could at the very least explain why this season has so often felt like a simulacrum of a much better television series. Leveraging familiarity among fans, characters and even the crew putting these episodes together—admirably bringing former actors and script supervisors and assistant directors from the series’ past two decades into bigger roles—The X-Files now relies less on interrogating Fox Mulder and Dana Scully as human beings progressing through time, than on stating many of the same obvious insights about what “rebooting” means more than 15 years after the show was at its popular and creative zenith, which is what it already did last season.

Perhaps The X-Files has always been this way, Mulder and Scully simply surviving, not affecting, the many ordeals within which all they can do is struggle to find meaning in a universe practically bloated with meaninglessness. Looking back, this may’ve always been the case: The alien colonization, the government’s conspiracies, the mass plague that may or may not have actually happened, the deaths of loved ones, the Truth. Whether or not any of it’s out there, it all happened despite Mulder and Scully’s best efforts, despite the sacrifices made by so many to reveal the truth, even though no revelation could actually stop any of it from coming to fruition. Which could be Chris Carter’s ultimate point: It doesn’t matter whether the truth is out there or not. The truth has abandoned us.


Paste Magazine

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 16:53

This Week’s ‘X-Files’ Would Be A Perfect End For The Series, But It Won’t Be

Alan Sepinwall
Senior Television Writer
03.14.18


FOX

A review of tonight’s The X-Files — and overall thoughts on this revival season — coming up just as soon as I notice that you got your hair cut…

“I always wondered how this was gonna end.” –Mulder

Assuming Gillian Anderson’s comments about being done playing Dana Scully aren’t public posturing, next week will be the final X-Files episode featuring her in the role — which would almost certainly make it the final X-Files episode, period, since nostalgia for the Anderson/Duchovny partnership has been the main driver for both revival seasons. (Lauren Ambrose and Robbie Amell have been fine in small doses as Scully and Mulder Jr., but you can’t build a show around those two.) And since I expect the finale to be every bit the dramatically inert swirl of conspiracy gibberish that the other three “My Struggle”s have been, I have to look at “Nothing Lasts Forever” as the real finale of the revival, and the real final chapter of the story of Dana Scully and Fox Mulder.

The episode was produced eighth but is airing ninth, perhaps because all involved recognized how well its themes suited a finale-ish position. In having Mulder and Scully go after a disgusting cult — led by TV’s best reactor to things himself, Jere Burns — that uses stolen human organs and blood in service of eternal youth for the aging sitcom star at the head of it, “Nothing Lasts Forever” was able to comment not only on the idea of Mulder and Scully still going on these adventures (and looking this good) at their age, but to force them to contemplate their own mortality and the eventual end of their stories. Mulder has to get progressive lenses, Scully has a near-death experience when she’s tossed down a garbage chute by the cultists (only to survive by landing on the decades’ worth of trash bags abandoned at the bottom), and the religious overtones of the case — and the Buffy-ish young woman impaling the cultists with iron spears she appropriated from a church fence — force our heroes to spend a lot of time at a house of worship, lighting candles and considering their pasts and futures.

It’s simultaneously the goriest episode of the revival — and on the gorier end of what the original series did, even if it doesn’t quite reach the disgusting heights of something like “Home”(*) — and one of its most wistful, because it’s so conscious of mortality, of being nearly done with these two, and of how strong their bond has become. Crazy one moment, sweet the next, and always on point because this season finally remembered why Mulder and Scully made such a great team.

(*) I was grocery shopping the other day, and the Trader Joe’s PA started playing Johnny Mathis’ “Wonderful Wonderful,” and I instantly shuddered at the memory of that episode used it.

Because all the Mulder/Scully scenes were so on point this year, there was a baseline level of entertainment that the 2016 episodes didn’t have, in part because Duchovny was phoning in his performance too often. Not every episode this time out has been an all-timer — though I wouldn’t be surprised if some X-Philes wound up placing both “The Lost Art of Forehead Sweat” and “Rm9sbG93ZXJz” high in an overall episode ranking — but even the more formulaic Monster of the Week stories like the previous episode have been solidly-crafted, and have understood when to simply lean on the core partnership and let it patch over whatever issues the hour might have. I’m generally anti-revival, and the previous season was a strong argument against the whole trend, but this round — “My Struggle III” excepted — has been a reminder that there are exceptions to every rule, particularly for shows as capable of being special as this.

We don’t have finale screeners yet, and a part of me is tempted to just skip it altogether. Scully whispering something in Mulder’s ear that we’ll never hear, Lost in Translation-style, and the two partners pledging to get through their future adventures and crises together, is such a perfect endpoint for all this that I’d almost rather not sully the memory of it with whatever nonsense comes next/last. But the eight non-mythology episodes of this season have been so satisfying, they may tempt me to spend one last hour in the company of our heroes, no matter how dumb it may get.

What did everybody else think of tonight’s episode? Of this season as a whole? Is anybody going to tap out before the finale?


UPROXX

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by jade1013 on Thu 15 Mar - 17:03



14 Mar 2018

The X-Files: "Nothing Lasts Forever" Review

By Matt Fowler

Warning: Full spoilers for the episode below.

"My gut doesn't need glasses."

In what just might be The X-Files' final standalone episode (save for the final few minutes, which seemed to set up next week's season finale), "Nothing Lasts Forever" saw both Mulder and Scully confronting aging while on the goofy, gory trail of a cult devoted to a silver screen has-been violently opposed to growing old (played with panache by Fiona Vroom - who also played CSM's wife in a flashback back in the season premiere).

Justified's Jere Burns also guest-starred this week, as the mad doctor who developed the icky and painstaking measures (hetero-chronic para-myosis something something) needed to stay young and beautiful. A method that involved not only butchering people in order to eat their organs, but also attaching other humans to yourself, surgically, to suck dry.

It was such a vile and seemingly laborious process that you could easily argue that the extra life it gave you wasn't worth living. Especially since Barbara Beaumont and Dr. Luvenis, along with all their rabble, had to live a cramped, reclusive (and demented) Sunset Boulevard existence.

Though, while not much about this "cult" made sense (how did anyone, even those with extreme dysmorphia, come to actually worship Barbara?), this chapter was a really fun, and gooey, send off for Mulder and Scully right before they enter the endgame of next week's Chris Carter-crafted finale. Our two heroes bantered about getting old (Mulder was in need of his glasses progressives) and personal faith while dealing a case that involved reverse-aging and religion-fueled vengeance.

The mystery was so insane, in fact, that it felt overly-manufactured to fit both our agents' end-of-series concerns - as in, it basically checked off a lot of things on their anxiety list - but it still worked well from a creepy empty calorie standpoint. I know The X-Files has pushed gore boundaries before (though FOX's Gotham seems to have taken the reins these days, from a network TV standpoint), but this episode was particularly gloppy and unsettling.

Then again, it contained Vroom dancing around the room, singing Maureen McGovern's "The Morning After," while drinking a (freshly harvested) bloody organ shake and being fawned at by zombie-minded morlocks. So, you know, it was also nicely laced with a jovial lunacy. Script supervisor-turned-writer Karen Nielsen created a messy, but very memorable, standalone send off/salute for our monster-hunting heroes. It starts off making you think it's about vampires, then spirals into dark vigilante territory, and then finishes off with a cannibal creepshow-style chaser.

The Verdict

"Nothing Lasts Forever" may have contained a monster plot that felt pieced together in order to ferociously fit with the themes of Mulder and Scully's final hurrah, but it was such a gloppy and gross good time that it all wound up working.

8.4
Great

Mulder and Scully uncovered a mad scientist's plot in one of the show's bloodiest chapters ever.


IGN

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 113146
Age : 53
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 11x09 - Nothing Lasts Forever

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum