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2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Thu 7 Apr - 3:42


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Thu 7 Apr - 6:39

What's New This Week At M. Judson?



Bucky F*cking Dent - David Duchovny

This richly drawn novel is a story of the bond between fathers and sons, Yankee fans and the Fenway faithful, and grapples with the urgent need to find our story in an age of irony and artifice. Culminating in that fateful moment in October of '78 when the meek Bucky Dent hit his way into baseball history with the unlikeliest of home runs, this tragicomic novel demonstrates that life truly belongs to the losers - that the long shots are the ones worth betting on.

Bucky F*cking Dent is a singular tale that brims with the hilarity, poignancy, and profound solitude of modern life.


M. Judson Books

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Thu 7 Apr - 6:41

Thanks

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Thu 7 Apr - 6:49

VIDEO: David Duchovny Celebrates the Losers In His New Book 'Bucky F**king Dent'

On last night's LATE SHOW, David Duchovny’s [Bleeping] title for his [Bleeping] book is a  [Bleeping] problem and he is going to have a hard time selling his book if no one can Google it! Check out clips from the appearance below!

THE LATE SHOW WITH STEPHEN COLBERT premiered on Tuesday, Sept. 8 on CBS.The show is broadcast from the historic Ed Sullivan Theater in New York City.

A multi-talented and respected host, writer, producer, satirist and comedian, Colbert is well-known for his previous late night show, "The Colbert Report," which concluded on Friday, Dec. 18, 2014. The program received wide-spread critical acclaim and earned two Peabody Awards and 29 Emmy Award nominations, including two Emmy wins for Outstanding Variety Series (2013, 2014) and four Emmy wins for Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program (2008, 2010, 2013, 2014). Prior to that, Colbert spent eight years as a correspondent on Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" as an on-air personality and writer of news satire for the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning series.





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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Thu 7 Apr - 6:49


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by Duchovny on Thu 7 Apr - 9:03

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Fri 8 Apr - 9:24

Bucky F*cking Dent by David Duchovny: EW review


B




Bucky F*cking Dent: A Novel
Genre: Novel; Author: David Duchovny; Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Giroux
Posted April 8 2016

For Red Sox fans, the 1978 baseball season is a tragedy, punctuated by the Yankee shortstop’s soul-crushing home run. To brighten things up, Duchovny sprinkles in some lung cancer. Ted is a Yankee Stadium peanut vendor who moves in with his dad, Marty, a Sox diehard fighting off cancer long enough to see his cursed team finally best their hated rivals. Though tragedy lurks on several levels, Duchovny finds the humor and poetry in life’s lost causes. The actor originally envisioned the novel as a screenplay, and there are characters—like Ted’s romantic interest—and twists that belong only in the movies. Still, Duchovny proves himself in flashback passages that expose the hearts and fears of little boys and grown men—and how each molds the other. B

Ew.com

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Apr - 9:27


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Fri 8 Apr - 10:46


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Fri 8 Apr - 11:50


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by Duchovny on Sat 9 Apr - 6:15

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Sat 9 Apr - 6:24

Sydney's Reviews > Bucky F*cking Dent: A Novel


Sydney's review
*****
it was amazing
bookshelves: fiction, library-book, kindle
Read from April 08 to 09, 2016



Going into this book, I had no idea what to expect. The title was definitely an attention-grabber. I'm familiar with David Duchovny, the actor (who also wrote one of my favorite X-Files episodes - "The Unnatural"). I was unfamiliar with David Duchovny, the novelist. All I knew was baseball.

I'll skip the opportunity to make some silly baseball reference that I'm sure will find its way into many other reviews.

Yeah, there's baseball. There's also a touching story about family; a complicated one about forgiveness and redemption. About an adult child getting to know their parent as a person, instead of stubbornly holding on to beliefs formed in their childhood.

I truly loved the bit about the rain. Laugh-out-loud funny, and also really sweet.

I didn't want the game to end.

On a personal note, I grew up with a father who has always been super into baseball (Cardinals all the way). After staying up all night, reading this in one sitting, I kinda want to go visit him. Smile

Nice work, David.

Goodreads.com

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Sat 9 Apr - 6:25


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Mon 11 Apr - 10:22

Book Review: Duchovny hits home run with new novel
By ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUBLISHED: 14:20 GMT, 11 April 2016



"Bucky F------ Dent" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), by David Duchovny

Actor David Duchovny, recently seen as Fox Mulder on "The X-Files" TV revival, follows his humorous New York Times best-seller "Holy Cow" with another funny and heartfelt story, "Bucky F------ Dent."

Ted Fullilove doesn't have much of a life. He lives alone, works at Yankee Stadium in a Mr. Peanut costume, and is estranged from his father.

Although he works for the Yankees, he's passionate about the Boston Red Sox. In the 1978 season, the Sox have a lead that looks insurmountable, and Ted wonders if this finally will be the year the Sox break the Bambino curse. Ever since the owner of the Red Sox traded away Babe Ruth to the Yankees at the end of the 1919 season, the Yankees have had success and the Red Sox have wallowed in misery.

Ted's father, Marty, who is stricken with cancer and dying, loves the Red Sox. Though they haven't spoken in years, Ted decides to move in with Marty so he can take care of him. Their relationship is strained, but they find solace and comfort together with baseball. Marty wants to live long enough to see the curse of the Sox broken. As the season progresses, Ted begins to steal newspapers and makes sure Marty hears the Sox are winning, though the Yankees are actually gaining in the standings.

Baseball fans will know why Duchovny gave the title to this book, and he does a terrific job of blending quirky and emotional writing in this story that is ultimately about the relationship between a father and his son.

Duchovny has hit this one out of the park.

Dailymail.co.uk

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Mon 11 Apr - 10:40


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Mon 11 Apr - 14:24

Meredith's Reviews > Bucky F*cking Dent: A Novel



Meredith's review Apr 11, 16
*****
it was amazing
bookshelves: fiction
Read from April 08 to 09, 2016



I  purchased this in both hard copy and audio, which I highly recommend. Hearing David Duchovny tell the story himself, with his own inflections, saying the words he wrote provides a deeper, fuller understanding of the characters, as he is who created them, designed them & gave them their personalities, words, & voices.

This novel is truly from the heart and it is reflected in his narration. Whereas his previous novel, Holy Cow, was a lovely little eccentric fable, BFD deals with much deeper issues, fathers, sons, loss, & baseball. It is both touching and funny, full of the quirky wit Duchovny has demonstrated in previous works and interviews. He is a master of allusion with a mind that makes lightning quick connections between multiple culturally literate references.

A common aspect in D.D.'s characters, present in his novels and scripts, that always surprises me is the deep sensitivity and vulnerability lingering just below the surface of all his characters, even in the snarkiest of the characters he has conjured into existence on the page. And, of course, as he is probably well aware, those characters are the ones who break our hearts the most when we see them lose their defenses and show any hurt or pain.

Listening to (& reading) BFD, at times, made my heart feel exposed, or that any given time it would be exposed, Hanuman-like, due to the intensity of feeling almost always present in the interactions b/n Marty & Ted, whether humorous or tragic. The poignant moments are particularly heightened emotionally when listening to the audiobook. I wanted to reach out to both give and receive comfort as Duchovny tells the story in his soft tones, his voice resonating with the grief, guilt, love, & regrets reflected within his characters.

The story takes place in 1978. Ted moves in with his estranged father, Marty, who is dying of cancer. Marty is rather curmudgeonly, typical of so many men in his generation. Ted is an adult, but a slacker with no real ambition. He is not a bad person, & not completely nihilistic, but he has lost any drive he may have once had and has resigned himself to the life of an underachiever. Both father & son carry heavy burdens of guilt and years of misunderstandings. Ted discovers that Marty's health & mood improves whenever the Red Sox win a game & begins, with the help of Marty's friends (the hilarious & marvelously constructed "Gray Panthers"), to create the illusion that the Red Sox are on a winning streak. Marty & Ted, despite all appearances to the contrary are more alike than different, demonstrated by their references, mutual knowledge & practical telepathy when it comes to thinking of the same poets & poems triggered by the same reference points.

This novel is full of love, laughter, life & baseball with a bit of sweet romance thrown into the mix. It revolves around everyday people, who live everyday lives, reflecting the fears, love, relationships, wishes & dreams that perhaps everyone carries in their hearts.

(For hardcore Duchovny fans, they may recognize some particularly personal references; not only regarding geography & Ted's educational & ethnic background, but of a mother who instilled a strict concern about money and a mention of an outline for a novel titled "Wherever There Are Two".)

Two specific moments of note:

1) In the audiobook, the narration of Chap. 76 is particularly beautiful.
2) The scene when Ted & Marty return to Marty's home after the big game painfully pricked at my heartstrings & I found myself suddenly break into heavy, body-shaking, wrenching sobs. I may laugh often with a book, but it is much harder for one to bring me to tears. "All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse and  the places and how the weather was." ~ Ernest Hemingwaysorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was." ~ Ernest
Hemingway

Goodreads.com

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Mon 11 Apr - 14:25


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by Pippytu on Mon 11 Apr - 15:51

Great Review, thanks
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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Tue 12 Apr - 8:23

In his new novel, David Duchovny explores fathers and sons, Red Sox and Yankees to the best of his ability


Bucky F*cking Dent: A Novel
By David Duchovny
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
304 pp; $29.99


On October 2nd, 1978, the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees, with 99 wins and 63 losses apiece, took to the field at Fenway Park in a one-game playoff for a ticket to the postseason. It was anybody’s game until shortstop Bucky Dent, batting a mediocre .243 for the season with only four homers to his name, walked up to the plate.

What Red Sox fans assumed would be an out turned into a lazy fly ball over the Green Monster in left field, a go-ahead home run en route to a Yankees victory that led to Sox fans dubbing the shortstop “Bucky F*cking Dent” to this day, and with such vigour that it may as well be on his birth certificate.

David Duchovny’s novel of the same name takes place during that fateful 1978 season. Wide on theme, it touches on everything from baseball to fathers and sons, marriage and sex and death. The actor’s second literary opus follows Theodore Lord Fenway Fullilove — Ted for short — a struggling New York writer who is weighed down not just by his beer gut but the heft of a hollow name, creating a veneer of expectation impossible to meet because he’s too busy shilling peanuts for a living at, wait for it, Yankee Stadium.



Farrar, Straus and Giroux
As a classic narcissist, one imagines Ted writes the way he talks: ironic, arrogant and packed so full of cursing, the words lose meaning. A pothead with a brain, he is too busy quoting Thomas Pynchon and Samuel Beckett to remember the last time he attracted a woman.

Imbued with the wonderment of Fox Mulder and the self-obsessed sleaze of Hank Moody, it’s hard not to draw parallels between the unlikeable Fullilove and the likeable Duchovny. Ted is, in his own words, “that quirky dude with a BA in English literature from Columbia who works as a peanut vendor in Yankee Stadium while he slaves away on the great American novel.” Meanwhile, Duchovny may not be in the concession business, but he is a two-time Ivy Leaguer.

Ted’s self-regard is tested when he encounters Mariana, a beautiful grief counselor he labels a “death nurse” — an intellect’s manic pixie dream girl — who calls one day to inform him that his estranged father Marty is dying with cancer.

An anomalous devout Red Sox fan in New York (hence his son’s name), Marty’s mental health relies on the steady rhythm of swings and misses, fouls and fly balls, as he dreams of the day his team reverses the curse and wins a World Series.

As a Yankees fan, Ted finds this quirk of Marty’s to be insufferable when he decides to move home and help his father through his final days. (It’s a quick and snappy choice, as most of the major ones in Bucky F*cking Dent are.) But whatever bones in Marty’s closet there are to pick, there is no longer any time, and so the two are simply “terminal together,” lapsing into passive aggressive humour, with Ted apologizing for being born, and Marty apologizing for being a lousy father, even though he “doesn’t really give a f—k.”

However, Ted and Marty are more similar than they initially care to admit, both too proud to own their faults, but also too sensitive to imagine life without the other to argue with while sharing a beer or a blunt.

In a moment that best captures their relationship, the two go for a swim at the local Y. Ted gets nervous removing his clothes in front of his father, but Marty has no problem bearing the angry red cancer scar on his chest. Suddenly, they wrap each other in a tight, naked hug, crying, when Marty informs Ted that he has a “perfectly respectable prick,” giving his son the praise he has long dreamed of — though perhaps not quite in the way he imagined.

Marty, weakened by cancer and regret, paints an increasingly innocent self-portrait in a journal Ted happens upon, and at first assumes is a novel, titled The Doublemint Man. Shocked by Marty’s impressive writing, the book serves for Ted as a “positive paternity test,” and Marty’s son, relieved, begins to realize he is more like his father than he imagined.

As Ted notices Marty’s health take a dip each time the Red Sox lose — which is often in the summer of 1978 — Ted devises a plan to trick him into believing the opposite. Using tapes of old games and rallying the local paperboy and bodega to cut the sports pages from the morning news, Ted convinces his father the Sox are in it to win it, and therefore, Marty can be, too. Until, of course, they make their way to Boston for the game where Bucky Dent decides to swing for the fences.

It’s in moments like this that Duchovny mercifully resists overwriting, giving the characters a much needed vulnerable authenticity. But these occurrences are so far and few between: the novel is so muffled by needless dialogue, with so much masturbatory pretension on the part of Ted, that it’s difficult to muster empathy.

“You write like you haven’t lived,” Ted recalls his agent once telling him. “You write well. About nothing. Your words are searching for a subject, looking around for something to hold on to, but they don’t find anything, only other words.” Bucky F*cking Dent is itself a novel with wasted potential, and would have been improved had Duchovny taken his own creation’s advice.

Reportca.net

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Tue 12 Apr - 8:39


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Tue 12 Apr - 8:54

David Duchovny’s New Baseball Novel Is Pretty Good, Dammit.

Sophomore book from X-Files and Californication star delves into 1970s NYC and father-son bonds

By Ken Kurson • 04/12/16 11:45am


David Duchovny attends “The X-Files” Fox premiere at California Science Center on January 12, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo: Araya Diaz/Getty Images)

Do you want to see eyes roll? Mention an actor whose desire to be taken seriously has led him to write a novel. It would be an unendurable cliché in David Duchovny’s case except that Bucky F*cking Dent, his new novel about baseball and fathers, is so f*cking good.

The book tells the late 70s era story of Ted Fullilove, who is squandering his Ivy League education by vending peanuts at Yankee Stadium while he struggles to write the Great American Novel. When Ted learns that his father, Marty, is dying of lung cancer, he moves back into his childhood home to ease Marty’s transition to the great beyond and also repair the damage that years of absenteeism have wrought. The hook is that Marty suffers when the Red Sox lose so Ted engineers a scheme, aided by the dishy Grateful Dead-tattooed Mariana, by which the Red Sox appear to erase the curse of the Bambino and win all of their closing games in 1978 (instead of, as all New Yorkers deliciously remember, choke down the stretch, with the title Yankee providing the death blow).

If it’s annoying that Mr. Duchovny, who’s already a phenomenally successful and painfully good-looking actor is also a funny and natural writer – his last book, the animal allegory Holy Cow, also earned high praise from skeptical critics—then at least give him some points for self-awareness. Like his character in Californication, Mr. Duchovny knows how he comes off and doesn’t mind if you resent him. He just wants a fair shake.

Mr. Duchovny spoke to the Observer about writing, acting and the shocking demise of the wondrous Garry Shandling.

“Is it weird to be thought of as a writer?’ I would be like no, I’ve always thought of myself as a writer who is doing some acting.

As I was reading this book and preparing to interview you, I thought of a scene in Californication where your character is giving a reading and the audience kind of boos the Hollywood figure who enters and you say, ‘my people.’ I wonder if that’s a sense of yourself that you have, a sort of a literary-minded guy that these really are your people.

I think maybe so. I mean obviously that was more from the mind of Tom Kapinos who wrote and created the show, and I think he would think of himself more as a literary person than as a Hollywood person, but I think you’re right for me as well. I grew up reading. I grew up being taught and told that books were a way to become more fully yourself and to become an adult. My father was a writer. My father published his first novel when he was 72. But when I was growing up he identified himself as a writer, even though he had a 9 to 5 job to support the family. So it was always part of my life and I would say, you know whenever I had to fill out those forms in school that asked you what you’re going to be I would always put writer, whatever that meant. I would put lawyer too because it seemed like they made decent money. It was always kind of just part of my identity, so when I finally got to it the last couple of years and people would ask me, “Is it weird to be thought of as a writer?’ I would be like no, I’ve always thought of myself as a writer who is doing some acting.

The last time I saw you in person was at Comic-Con when the X-Files was being rebooted and you and Chris Carter were on a panel. I felt such a tenderness toward these kids who really seemed like mostly outsiders wherever they live and they get to kind of come together. Your writing has a little bit of that feel. This guy Ted can’t find himself, so talk to me about how strongly you identify with your character.

I think I probably fit in better growing up than Ted does in the book, but I think if you’re a writer, that means that you’re an observer. You observe people, and that means that you have a mind that wants to do that. You have a mind that wants to observe more than it wants to engage in many ways. And you’re already outside because you’re looking in. That’s the nature of someone who desires to write. So I think temperamentally I’ve always been an observer, even though it might appear from the outside that I’m active and being included.

The writers you mention in the course of the book— Wallace Stevens and Walt Whitman and Shakespeare—are sort of $10 reference points. Are they influential on you and what about some contemporary writers other than your father who have influenced you?

I did major in English Literature, so I’ve read these people that I’m quoting. If you took it person by person, I mean Stevens is the more philosophical if not a stylistic influence on me. There’s the poet who is constantly going back to the idea that there is no reality, but the one we’re making up, we’re making it up with our poetries and all imaginative ways of trying to understand the world. For Stevens, poetry is probably the most honest because it’s constantly reinventing every time you start a poem, you’re reinventing the world as you saw it. So I think philosophically I really, not having grown up with any strong background in religion or any strong beliefs in any institutionalized religion, t.he idea that I could make the world make sense through art, through words, in this case through poetry, was very seductive to me. I haven’t said anything like that for years. I don’t even know if I’ve ever put it into words like that, you know, but that’s the truth. Stevens is a poet, so I don’t know stylistically how he affects me, but contemporary, I think Philip Roth is one of the greatest novelists of the last 100 years. To me, American Pastoral is the great American novel of the 20th Century.

Human Stain is the only Philip Roth movie that’s been a good movie. There have been other of his books that have been made into movies but none of them have been good, but Human Stain is actually an excellent movie.

I think they are making American Pastoral or they have made it. I dated a girl here in New York in my 20s whose mother was good friends with Roth, and as a little girl of 8 or 9 he told her to call him “Uncle Famous.”

I’m a gigantic Larry Sanders Show fan.

I am also, yeah.

With Garry Shandling’s sudden, mysterious and upsetting death, I went back and watched every minute of that show and your episode is really a turning point in that show, because it showed for the first time, I mean the whole shtick of the show is like you’re saying about poetry, that the fictionalization of the talk show is sort of more real than any David Letterman or whatever. And the discomfort that Larry Sanders experiences when David Duchovny, I don’t want to say with “you,” I don’t even know how to talk about it, which is your point…

Well, it’s funny because when we were doing that …I had one of those stars given to me on the Walk of Fame, you know that cheesy thing they do? And it’s cheesy but it’s totally cool. I don’t want to play it off. I mean I was like oh my God, this is kind of cool but it’s totally cheesy at the same time. But Garry came and he did like a 2-minute speech. This is all you can give at those things, and he talked about, “You realize that you’re playing a character that has your name,” you know. I said, “Yeah, but I’m playing the character name. I’m not playing David Duchovny.” He said, “Well you realize people aren’t really going to know that or understand that.” I said, “Yeah, but we understand it, we know it, so it’s okay.” And then he just went from there. We had become friends because I was such a huge fan of the show and I was able to get on it the year before. I begged my agent. I said, “Whatever you do I want to do that show.” I was up in Canada shooting the X-Files, so whatever, I’ll do anything, just can I get on that show? So he got me on and I did a little bit where I got bumped from my spot.

Right. You said there had better be a big fucking fruit basket waiting for me….

Right! So we did that, and Gary and I just became friends. Like we exchanged numbers. I was living in Vancouver and he was in LA, but he had a basketball game that he hosted every Sunday and he invited me to come play in it and I did and we just became really the best of friends. You know his loss to me is very great and very personal, but if I can be gratified by anything it’s that I see a real outpouring of love and beyond that appreciation for his work, you know. I use that word ‘work’ because he was a very serious artist. He was a guy that was constantly questioning himself and trying to evolve and took acting very seriously, and took comedy very seriously and was always changing and questioning. And beyond that, so generous. I think what you’re getting from people who are stepping forward and telling their stories about when Garry helped me with this, helped me with that. He was extremely generous and influential. You know it’s like I say about music, I think about Hendrix. If you go back and you listen to Hendrix and you’re like where have I heard that before? It’s because everybody has done it, and Garry is like that. It’s like you go back and look at Garry and what you have to realize is Garry is doing that for the first time. Garry was doing that before everybody else was doing it, and that’s the truth.

Even your description of how you became friends is exactly on that reality TV line, because in the show you become friends with him later on and almost lovers because of you being booked on the show. You’re saying in real life you and Garry Shandling became friends because you wanted to be booked on his show.

Well, that’s what happened. I would play in this basketball game, and I think we talked about like a DVD for when The Best of Larry Sanders was released, and he did a lot of very interesting interviews. I was saying we went down to his basketball court to talk about it and the way I remember it happening was we were playing, we were having this game and I said, “Wouldn’t it be funny if I had a crush on you but it’s a heterosexual crush on a man it’s like this weird kind of crush.” He was like, “Yeah, you want to do that?” I was like, “Yeah. I just want to do something funny. I think we could make that funny.”

That’s so good.

And then it just happened that one weekend, you know this sounds so show-biz and I will have to be guilty of sounding show-biz, but I came down for the Golden Globes and I guess I was still in Vancouver for X Files so I stayed in a hotel in Los Angeles before flying back. And after the ceremonies I invited Garry to hang out in my room before I went back, and he came over and I was in my robe, and I said, “When we shoot this it will be funny if I’m in a robe and we do the whole Sharon Stone thing.” Garry was constantly open to someone else’s ideas. I think I told him how much I appreciate him while he was alive. I’m pretty sure that I did, but I don’t know that I ever thanked… You never feel like you thanked somebody enough when they’re gone.

Are you as big a baseball fan as I believe you would have to be to write this?

I grew up as a passionate baseball fan. I wouldn’t say I’m still that kind of a baseball fan. You know I don’t follow the Yankees anymore, but as a kid, my big fan days would have been the ages of 7 to 12-13, and that’s 1967 to 1972 and those are horrible Yankee years. …right after my Mantle retired and before Steinbrenner came.

Bobby Murcer was their big celebrity signing.

Well to me Mel Stottlemyre was the guy. Actually when Mel Stottlemyre would lose, you know he was the one all-star that they had, and he had a great name. You can’t get much better than “Mel Stottlemyre.”
 

The cover of David Duchovny’s new novel, ‘Bucky F*cking Dent’ (Photo: Screenshot/ Amazon)

Mr. Duchovny is appearing tonight (April 12) at the Barnes and Nobles in Union Square and will be interviewed by Budd Mishkin at the 92nd Street Y next Tuesday April 19. His new novel, Bucky F*cking Dent, was published this month by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.


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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Tue 12 Apr - 8:56

Thanks

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by Pippytu on Tue 12 Apr - 10:49

So far the book seems to be getting some really nice reviews. I'm so happy for David.
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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Thu 14 Apr - 13:56




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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Thu 14 Apr - 13:57

Thanks

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by sir on Fri 15 Apr - 11:04

Bucky F*ucking Dent by David Duchovny (5 out of 5)



I wait for the day this man writes his memoirs. I DO hope it’s on the list. Then again, he treasures his privacy and probably wouldn’t make those memories public. You have to respect that. You know, I’m biased because I LOVE David Duchovny. I really liked Holy Cow, his first fiction book that came out last year, and I loved this one- although for a host of different reasons. As I was reading this book- similar to when I was reading Holy Cow (although that was different because Elsie is a female, and David is NOT), I could hear his voice narrating the book. I told my coworker Andrew this, and he said he could see that, having snuck a peek at the book. That made it even easier to read. There’s a love of baseball here, but more importantly, there’s the love between a son and his dying father. That, given my situation at home with my dad, hits hard. There were points reading this where I had to set it down because it made me cry. Sometimes, it’s cathartic to have a book do that for you. This book is such a book. Of course, you have the trademark Duchovny humor. The same sort you would imagine if you engage him in a Twitter conversation about politics, for example. (Or he takes to Twitter to expound on a book that he loved and that deserves major kudos- “The Cant-idates” by Craig Tomashoff, for the record). But you also have the unusual feat of a fictional book with a highly unusual premise grabbing your attention with the lead characters, and keeping that attention until the end of the book. It’s a book you should pick up and gift your own father with on Father’s Day. Seriously- my first post closer to Father’s Day is going to be a gift guide for books for Father’s Day…. and not the atypical “BBQ”, “golf”, etc. books…different books. This book is out now. Go grab a copy from your closest bookstore.

Ted lives with his battery operated goldfish. He’s an Ivy League grad who took a turn down a different road- to the ballpark, where he plays Mr. Peanut at Yankee Stadium, while waiting for the ghost of the next great American novel to visit him. He gets a phone call telling him that his estranged father Marty is dying of lung cancer, so he packs up and moves home. It quickly becomes apparent that Marty is THE die-hard Boston Red Sox fan, and every time his Red Sox lose, his condition takes a turn for the worse. Ted, battling between his grief at his father’s worsening health and attempting to be the good son and take care of his dad in his waning days, comes up with the harebrain scheme to end all harebrain schemes. With the help of the neighborhood friends and his dad’s grief counselor, he stages the illusion of a Boston Red Sox winning season (this takes place during the Carter presidency, when the BoSox were in the same dregs as the Chicago Cubs. They had not yet seen the glory of that World Series ring), to get his father to rally. Things, as you can guess, don’t quite go according to plan. And that, my friends, is why this book is so incredibly easy to get into and stay into. I can’t tell enough people how great of a read it is, and how quirky and yet quietly heartbreaking in others. But don’t just listen to me- go get a copy!

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Re: 2016/04/05 - Bucky F*cking Dent

Post by jade1013 on Fri 15 Apr - 11:05


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