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David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Tue 16 Jun - 12:12




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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Tue 16 Jun - 12:14

Great! Thanks

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by TheDuchess on Tue 16 Jun - 18:56

Very exciting partay
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Thu 18 Jun - 11:39


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Thu 18 Jun - 11:45

Cool!

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Duchovny on Fri 19 Jun - 7:25

great!!!
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Fri 19 Jun - 10:04

Daniel Pujol (Pujol) Talks David Duchovny’s Hell or Highwater


By making a rock album, David Duchovny is trying something different, and for that he gets a lot of props.

Jun 19 Friday

A few weeks ago, I was in this warehouse with a noise artist, and he goes, “Why does everything have to be innovative?”

It was a great contrarian point within our conversation about the Genre Jam Renaissance Fair. It’s stuck with me. It’s not a question to be agreed or disagreed with, really, it’s just something to consider.

So I’ve been considering it in regard to this David Duchovny album, Hell or Highwater. This album isn’t reinventing the wheel, and maybe that’s not always bad. Stay with me now. It is using the wheel to get somewhere, in a very contemporary fashion, that a lot of people dig.

So, for starters, Duchovny is just playing by the rules.

You see, if people my age and younger can download ZIPs and RARs of obscure albums and artists throughout the global history of recorded music and reappropriate those aesthetics, mythologize their narrative devices as signifiers of authenticity, and act them out ritualistically, why can’t Duchovny not reinvent the wheel? The answer to that probably boils down to personal preference.

Sure, the RAR and ZIP experience of time and conveniently grasping culture inward like a pool drain augments the wheel, but does it really reinvent it? Or just how we experience the wheel? How we feel about the wheel? Not the wheel itself. Damn, did it?

You know, there’s plenty of far-out music going on everywhere for people obsessed with innovation. This is not their album.

So again, I ask, “Why not?” as a test to myself, so I don’t just say “mediocre dad-rock” and type some Botox-stay-young-forever-faux-Futurist bullshit about this record.  As an artist, I have my own answers to that question, but they’re my answers for my stuff, not Duchovny’s.

So, for the sake of this piece, I’m going to treat this like a different beast, one of narrative utility occurring within an established format, and ride that pony under the microscope. I’m thinking one guy, saying some stuff into a microphone, for better or for worse within the confines of a culturally established artistic framework: the rock album. Not “this-rock” or “that-rock,” just “rock-rock.”

This album seems to come from a place where the idea of making an album serves a certain cultural function. Duchovny inserts his “rock album agency” into a mid-20th-century, sunset-staring, male singer-songwriter archetype with a little 2D social commentary.

That’s not a criticism, it’s an observation. Remember, he’s primarily an actor who just started playing guitar; however, he has a legit writing background. Which, to me, makes that choice even more interesting, because he almost has a Ph.D. Why grab for that archetype?

Now, my criticism on the words front is that, because I know this guy almost finished a dissertation titled “Magic and Technology in Contemporary Fiction and Poetry,” and his senior thesis was about Samuel Beckett, he could’ve gone way, way, way more far out with the lyrical presentation of his ideas, and I wish that he would’ve. The world could’ve handled it. He should make another album on a Tascam or Garageband when he does.

However, the lyrics do strongly communicate what David likes, and he uses what he likes to communicate. There are references to the Beatles, Dylan, science, etc. For instance, “The Rain Song” has got this cute little lyrical nod of, “Hey, maybe the Beatles are an expression of some essential perennial philosophy in our debatably secularized and increasingly inclusive advanced capitalist society, baby”:

People just keep moving around
Trying to find a place in the sun
Laying the towels and the troubles down
When you feel like the day is too long
Nowhere to hide
Nowhere you belong
Put your hands down
Let the Heaven come down to you
Love is all you need
That’s what the book of John taught you
But you wanna see clouds above
I know that better than anyone
Because my darling is the way you love
It will always be raining in this song

Remember, all that just happened on a beach towel. It’s got a sense of humor while addressing some unknown second party. I wish the overall production allowed more of those potential subtleties within the narrative delivery to breathe. Even my least favorite track, “3000,” has some humor. Duchovny managed to temper this 20th-century binary, early 2000s-style, ahistorical, 24-hour news cycle media over-simplification with some humor. He goes from:

East and West stare each other down
Opposing sides of a divided town
Like soldiers frozen in the coldest war
They’ve forgotten what they’re fighting for

to:

3000 steps forget about 12

Rapid modernization and post-WWI and WWII border-redrawing aside, the humor informs me that he likes the 20th-century protest/normative political poet archetype, but he doesn’t think he is that. Like I said, I think he’s playing by what he thinks the rules are in a way he enjoys.

Here’s one more for fun from the title track:

So in the test of our love
When push comes to shove
In the test of our love, darling, yeah
If it’s multiple choice
I’m gonna mark ‘all of the above’

There are a few pretty good lines on the album, so I’m lobbying for a Duchovny II with an emphasis on Creative Writing.

Lyrically, a lot of the songs deal with externals and Duchovny’s self-evaluated proximity to them as a mediator, consoler, lightweight “liberal” critic or trespasser. It’s pretty straightforward and dressed in denim. However, I would have liked more, even though I really appreciated the humor.

Musically, it is contemporary standard. Sounds like the “not-edgy” public place music I hear when I’m out and about, spending my dollars like a good boy. It’s not really my bag, but there is a whole lot of everything that I’m totally out of step with in general. That’s my baggage. I won’t make Duchovny hold it.

The rigidness of the post-production is the most confusing part of the record. Mostly on the upper-tempo numbers. By post-production, I mean editing, instrument and vocal tightening, lining up instrument performances by lining up the transients of their waveforms in a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) such as Pro Tools.

The album sounds very, very “official,” and occasionally that can conflict with the humor that helps to contextualize the lyrics. I don’t think Duchovny is seriously marking “all of the above” at some kind of creepy dystopian vacation-love clinic. At least, I hope not. However, I had to listen a few to times to really put my mind at ease.

Remember, Duchovny’s never made an album before, and that sound and production style are basically industry standard. So it’s what you’ve got to deal with if you don’t want to be viewed as an “outsider artist,” or “lo-fi,” and I’m sure his publicist did not want that.

The production is presented a little more confidently than the material, so you have to dig a bit for the human element. However, there is a real human element: the sound of trying.

However, please remember, it is dude’s first record — I am not expecting the vulnerability of the White Album, but you could make a lot of assumptions about the entire record’s intention solely based on production, and just be a bitch about it. If you did that, you’d miss out on some pretty good dry humor and some legitimate attempts at human communication.

Dude is trying to participate.

So, I don’t want to immediately say “mediocre production,” because navigating a studio now is crazy. Especially if you’re new to it. The technology and those wielding it move fast, and the artist is expected to keep up. Who knows what these sessions were like. This is why I hope for the Tascam MKIII album Duchovny II. What will those temporary secretaries be like?

A beginner’s record, a hobbyist record, is so interesting to me. Records like this place a human in a new environment with new rules, and I find it consistently interesting when any human chooses to do that. For many reasons, such as how much they identify with their implicit perception of a new environment’s “established rules.” Or what they think the new environment is “for,” etc.

You know, I’ve got a lot of friends that are having kids or non-musical careers, but I’m still interested in what they’ve got cooking in their noggins, and I am willing to listen, especially if we are sharing a creative medium, but our life experiences are very different. People using their dominant, non-musical life experiences to anchor their musical output fascinates me. In terms of working artists, I think that could be becoming more usual than unusual.

You know, Wallace Stevens sold insurance, wrote poetry, fought Hemingway in the street, and lost.

The human gamut can be pretty interesting if you don’t think you’ve surrendered.

Now, I love and make rock & roll music, but for the big picture, I’d begrudgingly say rock & roll music is America’s crazy rich people carnival opera of today. It’s “safer” than rap, “more sophisticated” than Energy Drink Peasant Country Music, and its framework and archetypes have been pretty much absorbed by our greater culture.

I’m not saying Duchovny’s a crazy rich person, but I am saying that making a rock album now is fair game for anybody. Period. Any economic agent, men, women, children, algorithms, etc. The medium is not cutting-edge innovation. However, it does provide a culturally understood framework to communicate a lyrical or craft-based narrative. So great, throw a human in the middle of that, but let it be a human.

Perhaps, dad rock is only as vapid as our culture expects it to be. And expectation can act as permission.

I’m tired of expecting culture to be vapid. So I jumped on this album, because I’m tired of bowing down to vapidity, and cynically digging deeper and deeper into some faux-underground cliché that is most likely bankrolled by an energy drink company in order to capture, cage, and Snapchat “the truth”: a mystified, fetishized cousin of “the authentic,” traded like a high-end commodity and currency in the post-2008 Information Age.

And also, in many cases, Hell or Highwater is probably what “the authentic” looks like: a little confused, clunky, unmanicured, rudimentarily postured, and adhering to contemporary standards in order to be allowed to participate.

It comes off like Duchovny wanted to make a functional “rock album” because he likes “rock albums,” and he likes people. I still wish he’d pushed harder on the lyrics, but maybe he was writing in accordance with his perception of the medium’s “rules.” Still interesting. Plus, he tried.

And is that bad? Is the sound of someone trying bad?

I like the sound of someone trying, even if I’m not blown away by what it sounds like. I get more out of this album existing than I get out of the album itself. I want David, and anybody interested, to bring out the magic and technology in contemporary anything.

I’m not saying everybody should be an artist, or they should gush and express themselves constantly. Leave that to Facebook, but if you feel like Wallace Stevens, go for it, but maybe just don’t try to fight Hemingway. Leave that to the FBI.


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Fri 19 Jun - 10:10

Thanks

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Sat 20 Jun - 6:20




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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Sat 20 Jun - 6:22


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Tue 30 Jun - 11:17

Album Review: David Duchovny’s 'Hell or Highwater'—the truth is right here
| Tuesday, June 30, 2015, 3:00 pm |





CULTURE » Music

Album Review: David Duchovny’s 'Hell or Highwater'—the truth is right here
| Tuesday, June 30, 2015, 3:00 pm |



Written by Jason Gottfried

Yeah, you read that correctly. FBI Special Agent Fox Mulder is singin’ the blues.

With a voice that has been recently described by music critics as “serviceable” and “decent,” David Duchovny apparently bombed a choir audition as a kid. He never even played a guitar until a few years ago, and he’s hardly sung a note for decades (there weren’t too many musical numbers in the X-Files, although a Seth MacFarlane remake would change that). He admits that during the first day of recording, he found himself on the floor, yelling that it was all a mistake.

Duchovny is far from the first actor-turned-singer-songwriter. Steve Martin has proven to be as good a banjo player as he is a comedian, actor, or director, which is saying a lot. And holy shit, Jeff Bridges! That voice was made for country. He blew millions of minds with “Crazy Heart.” Then there’s Jack Black, whose training was in musical theatre at Julliard and who is just as funny singing as he is acting. Other superstars, such as Madonna and Cher, have also managed dual careers. To our relief, Mark Wahlberg gave up his (allegedly) Funky Bunch, only to become a surprisingly good actor.

On this similar end of the scale, we find Billy Bob Thornton’s lukewarm rockabilly band, The Boxmasters. Jared Leto does … something. Zooey Deschanel does a thing. Kevin Costner, Don Johnson, Russell Crowe (yikes), and even Keanu Reeves (wince) have mistakenly wandered into recording studios. For Pete's sake, even William Shatner is putting stuff out there. More recently, Miley Cyrus’s transition from irritating Disney protégé to full-blown obnoxious social misfit has redefined tactlessness to previously unimagined extremes and will likely keep intelligent life from contacting our planet for centuries. Some have succeeded and some have not, but from J Lo to Will Smith, droves of actors have lost their way, blinded by their own glory and a choir of yes-men and financed by their stage and screen successes—much to the annoyance of legitimate musicians struggling to be heard.

Enter the man most commonly known as Agent Mulder, or "that dude who couldn’t keep it in his pants" in “Californication.” He doesn’t appear to harbor any illusions of grandeur; on the contrary, this is a dude whose first song to learn was The Flaming Lips’ “Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots.” Compare that to a young, head-in-the-clouds Kurt Cobain who initially taught himself “Stairway to Heaven.”

As such, Duchovny—already established as an actor, producer, director, and even novelist—has nothing to prove, nothing to lose, and nothing to win. He’s publicly admitted that he’ll never be one of the Three Tenors, nor will he ever win American Idol. Being an artist—rather than a mere capitalist or attention whore—he simply wants to express himself and to be heard.

Few people realize that Duchovny is both a Princeton and a Yale graduate, holding a bachelor’s and master’s degree in English literature. So when divorce struck, he predictable turned to the pen for solace. What came next was a flood of poetry that seemed like it could be lyrics. Like any heartbroken English major, he wrote his lyrics and fiddled around with his guitar at home, and that was that.

It was meeting Brad Davidson of ThinkSay Records that really got things moving toward publication. Duchovny is backed by Berklee graduate and producer Colin Lee on keys (as well as Berklee grad band Weather). When Lee first heard the songs, he remarked that one in particular needed a bridge. Duchovny’s charmingly replied, “What’s a bridge?” So it’s apparent on this recording that if it sounds good, Lee and Weather are to thank. It does, and they are: the drums are always tasteful, and the occasional guitar solos—while arguably short of being the perfect right-note-at-the-right-time statements soloists strive for—are golden enough to push the songs from point A to point B without losing any momentum. Whatever these dudes got paid for this session, they at least get to put “recorded an album with David Duchovny” on their resumes.

In a statement, Duchovny stated, “I feel these songs represent the truest expression that I've ever been able to achieve and I look forward to sharing it with everyone." He offers “Hell or Highwater” with refreshing sincerity and no pretense, which is wise because it is not exactly solid gold. But it’s not a clunker either. In a sense, it’s a novelty; in another sense, it’s just another medium of expression for a fairly talented guy. If nothing else, it’s an act of bravery. He’s not God’s gift to lyricists, but he’s not competing with much in 2015.His already sullen, introverted demeanor lends itself well to the folky, broken-hearted songs, doing them at least some justice. His band, however, is pretty fantastic.

“Let It Rain” opens with acoustic guitar, and we soon hear Duchovny’s relatively naked voice, which turns out to be quite deep and gravelly, with Jeff Tweedy’s (of Wilco) same deadpan, half-spoken inflection. Lyrically, it’s fairly straightforward, particularly when the listener knows the backstory (a divorce from Tea Leoni). His vocals are comfortably on-pitch, more so than a lot of contemporary “recording artists” can manage, and—most importantly—he’s sincere.

Soon after the drums break through a miasma of distortion, it becomes clear that “3000” is an anti-war song. Duchovny’s vocals are more stilted and forced on this one, suggesting that rocking out isn’t really what Ivy League boys are groomed for. “Stars” lies lower to the ground, like a soft country western ballad. He has the same hesitation as Bob Dylan, but his voice has the lower, rougher texture of Dylan’s son, Jakob.

The title song feels similar to “Stars,” if a bit closer to Americana, and Duchovny delivers his first truly solid line: “A man of words is a man of lies.” However, he follows it with some mangled imagery: “And I can't turn this shitstorm red to some / Rainbow sunshower of holy red wine.” Maybe it’s not Wordsworth or Tennyson, but at least the genuine heartbreak comes through.

“The Things” is slow-burning, Tom Petty-style rock, almost like “Last Dance With Mary Jane” at two-thirds the speed. Again, Duchovny’s voice is most endearing when it seems like he’s trying to hide it rather than show it off, breaking a little at times and at others falling off of notes at the ends of lines.

The second song about rain, “The Rain Song” (someone is sad) is upbeat but retains that relative penchant for darkness that Duchovny not only benefited from in the X-Files but has already firmly established as a stylistic trend in his music. “Unsaid Undone” is a litany of paradoxes, like “Powerlessness / my only power.” He touches briefly on psychology and therapists with the line, “Mediocrity / for hourly fees” (which he says is the only moment in the album when he’s truly angry).

“Lately It’s Always December” might be a low point or a high one. The arrangement is so good that it’s hard to imagine a better recorded and produced version of this song. Really, the only improvement to be made is getting someone else to sing it. Duchovny doesn’t suck, but Weather and Lee are back there really making art behind Duchovny’s relatively so-so singing.

Reaching back toward Johnny Cash territory, but crossing Eddie Vedder and Ryan Adams along the way, “Another Year” features prominent backing vocals as well as a driving train beat over a Hammond organ. The verses are okay, but the choruses and refrains are great: Duchovny doesn’t exactly soar, but he’s able to lift his voice confidently enough to carry this song out of the cold caves into which he otherwise so easily settles.

“Passenger” features a lame twist on the cliché, “Objects in the mirror / Are farther than they appear,” a low-hanging lyrical fruit that must have been too irresistible to refuse. There are a few others, but attempting to pick out every cliché or hackneyed verse in the album would warrant an article unto itself. At one point, Duchovny attempts a melisma that he would have been wise to shy away from.
The penultimate track, “When the Time Comes,” manages—like the first track—to expose Duchovny’s voice completely, laying bare its grainy, velvety feel. But he doesn’t control it well, so when he sings casually enough, it works. Like a young Dirk Diggler, Duchovny may have an anatomical gift, but it seems that he’s still learning how to use it.

“Positively Madison Avenue” engages in some interesting storytelling that affords Duchovny opportunities to mention fun stuff like car salesmen, following Gandhi on Twitter, Leonard Cohen, and protein shakes. It’s a decent social critique, and Duchovny even has the cojones to call out Bob Dylan for allowing his music to be used for advertisements. It’s not mean spirited, though. He told Rolling Stone magazine (named after what? A Dylan song?) that “If I were him, I wouldn't give a shit what I think,” continuing that “I'm happy he can make money. I think he can do whatever the fuck he pleases, and he's aces with me forever.” You’d think that the last song would be Duchovny’s big exit, but—ever the humble introvert—he excuses himself completely for the last minute or two while Lee and Weather rock it out.

Look, there’s nothing wrong with hobbyist recording. Connan Mockasin’s life-changing “Forever Dolphin Love” was recorded in his house at the behest of his “mum.” He never even thought anyone would hear it. Fortunately for us, someone did. Playing the lottery for fun is harmless, but playing it out of desperation for success is dangerous—and so it is in the arts. It’s only when people try to pass off their upper-class ego trips as art and foist them upon the public that there’s a problem. As David Duchovny has presented “Hell or Highwater” with so little pomp or fanfare and instead with so much honesty, humility, and even self-deprecation, and given such a stellar and polished performance by his studio musicians, it’s easy to forgive its shortcomings and relish its charm.

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Tue 30 Jun - 11:32


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Pangaea on Wed 1 Jul - 7:11

Wow...what a great review!   Someone who really listened to the words, and knew the divorce backstory, but didn't belittle David's best effort. I particularly loved this comment
You’d think that the last song would be Duchovny’s big exit, but—ever the humble introvert—he excuses himself completely for the last minute or two while Lee and Weather rock it out.
and also the last paragraph.

Thanks for posting sir. Smile
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Fri 17 Jul - 10:31



David Duchovny: Hell or Highwater

Josh Goller

Citing Wilco as an influence, Duchovny’s folk-rock sensibilities are of the sleepy dad-rock variety.

2 / 5


David Duchovny is having quite the year. News that “The X-Files” would follow in the footsteps of “Twin Peaks” and return with a limited television revival should’ve given the actor ample reason to rest on his creative laurels—especially since “Californication” wrapped last year and he’s already busy starring in the new show “Aquarius.” Instead, Duchovny has been taking a stab at other forms of creative expression, releasing a folk-rock album and even publishing a debut novel written from the perspective of a cow.

There’s something refreshing about a famous actor dabbling in music without the usual “music was my first love, I just fell into acting” humblebrag. Sure, Duchovny may have been able to chat about his foray into music on late night talk shows but otherwise, Hell or Highwater appeared with barely a whisper. (Hell, my review copy arrived as a CD-R labeled by nothing but black Sharpie ink.) Duchovny only learned to play the guitar within the past few years, a fact that—to his credit— isn’t all the obvious on his debut LP.

Citing Wilco as an influence, Duchovny’s folk-rock sensibilities are of the sleepy dad-rock variety. There are pleasant guitar chord progressions, steady drums and some pedal steel thrown in for extra sentimentality. His voice may not be all that dynamic, but at least he’s not as flatly-affected as some of his most memorable TV characters. There’s nothing overtly dislikeable about any of this, even if it’s pure vanilla. But the songwriting is what ultimately sinks Hell or Highwater, as one could likely deduce from the use of such a well-worn album title.

In fact, Duchovny piles on the clichés and aphorisms to a degree that seems likes he’s trying to be ironic. But these songs are wrapped in the sentimental and earnest regret of a man who saw his 15-plus year marriage officially end a year ago. The album’s often forlorn lyrics are directed towards a woman, fictional or not. There’s talk of seeing her “all in white again,” of sins and redemption, of the moon and cleansing rain. That’s standard fare to begin with, and the album devolves into near-silliness with lines like “I won’t wipe away the tears you cry with any tissue of lies” or “Like soldiers frozen in the coldest war/ They’ve forgotten what they’re fightning for.”

And there’s more than a few musical sequences that sound familiar. One of the album’s better offerings, “The Things” shares similarities with the beat and crunchy guitar of “Mary Jane’s Last Dance,” even if Duchovny’s vocals are mellower. And the first few moments of Hell or Highwater are a dead ringer for the jangly opening to R.E.M.’s “Man on the Moon.” Duchovny serves himself best when he sticks with the acoustic guitar. Appearing mid-record, the gentle “The Rain Song” sees Duchovny begin to hit his modest musical stride (even if he does his best to sink it by referencing both the Beatles and the Bible in the same line). “Lately It’s Always December” has tender musical moments, though the “Cowgirl’s gaze and a sailor’s mouth” imagery feels trite. The faster tempo electric guitar tracks are what land with a thud. “Unsaid Undone” explodes off the line but pulls up lame as Duchovny sings about powerlessness being his only power (and hopelessness his only hope). And “3000” sounds like bad karaoke by Fox Mulder. The churning and wistful “Another Year” may be the only harder-edged track that manages to work.

Despite Duchovny’s poetic failings, there’s still a “you know what, good for him” quality to Hell or Highwater. Though it may be difficult to pinpoint the target market for the record, one gets the sense that there’s a personal catharsis in there. That doesn’t make this good music—for the rest of us, there’s little more than novelty appeal. But Duchovny could be sitting back collecting those big fat TV royalty checks. Instead he’s putting himself out there in new ways. Hard to fault a guy for that.


  • Label:
    ThinkSay Music
  • Release Date:
    May 12, 2015



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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Fri 17 Jul - 10:48

Thanks

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Duchovny on Sat 18 Jul - 2:39

thanks
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Sat 18 Jul - 3:39



braddny@littlekerrylee at City Hall getting paperwork done so we can bring @davidduchovny to Chicago! Thank you for being a superstar and getting everything done

braddny

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Sat 18 Jul - 4:29


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Duchovny on Sun 19 Jul - 1:28

thanks
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Thu 23 Jul - 16:03

David Duchovny – Hell or Highwater
BY DAN CAFFREYON MAY 07, 2015,



When A-list actors embark on recording careers, they’re often on the defensive before the music even comes out. Billy Bob Thornton — who drums and sings in the sorta-okay rockabilly outfit The Boxmasters — has always insisted that his fortune as an actor is “accidental” and that music is his first love, a stance akin to a supermodel saying she was just offered a contract after accompanying a friend to an audition. That kind of success doesn’t happen accidentally; you have to actually want it.

So, it’s refreshing that David Duchovny’s musical debut is such a low-key affair. He makes no false claims of being a musician before he was an actor — in fact, he didn’t even start playing guitar until a few years ago, which coincided with him trying his hand at poetry. His poetry rhymed, songs are supposed to rhyme, bada bing bada boom: He had enough material for an album.

And, to his credit, he knows his way around a meat-and-potatoes chord progression. Opener “Let It Rain” and the more Western Swing-leaning single “Another Year” both have a likable roots rock directness akin to latter-day Wilco and R.E.M., two bands that Duchovny cited as influences while recording. Likewise, closer “Positively Madison Avenue” rolls along with muscle that feels custom-built to soundtrack bar chatter. It thankfully lacks the theatrical pretension found in other actor-fronted bands like, say, 30 Seconds to Mars.

But, as nice as it is to see a 54-year-old celebrity be so humble when picking up an instrument for the first time, Duchovny’s musical greenness shows throughout his debut, especially in the lyrics. The title of the album and its namesake song comes from an overused saying, and the words elsewhere rely on similar cliches as Duchovny makes surface-level observations about war, addiction, social media, and, most of all, crumbling relationships. For his part, he tends to blame himself for his well publicized romantic failings, but that doesn’t make phrases like “You can’t hurt the one you already left behind” and “If it’s multiple choice, I gotta mark ‘none of the above'” any less robotic. And when he tries to venture into more poetic, image-driven territory, it just comes out purple: “Cowgirl gaze and a sailor’s mouth” or “I can’t turn this shit-storm right into some rainbow sun-shower of holy red wine.”

There’s also his voice, which, while serviceable, doesn’t have much of an identity yet — more a smoother Leonard Cohen than any kind of unique personality. It’s no coincidence that he name-checks the singer-songwriter in “Positively Madison Avenue” and, earlier on, The Beatles in “3000”. You have to emulate before you can innovate, and as Duchovny continues to hone his musical chops, perhaps he’ll transform the sounds of his heroes into something that’s distinctly his own.

Essential Tracks: “Let It Rain”, “Positively Madison Avenue”

Consequenceofsound.net

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Thu 23 Jul - 16:20


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Duchovny on Fri 24 Jul - 1:58

thanks
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by jade1013 on Fri 24 Jul - 10:23


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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jul - 10:27

Thanks

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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by Duchovny on Fri 24 Jul - 10:55

thanks
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by spooknic on Fri 24 Jul - 17:06

I haven't been here in a while, but I wanted to chime in about how awesome I think David's new album is here and make a brief, unsolicited comment about how I think he is referencing the song "Idiot Wind" by Dylan in Unsaid, Undone. The lyrics I've seen out there on sites are terribly transcribed for all the songs on David's album (ironically the site "Genius" being the worst of them) and I think this got interpreted as "idiot win." But to really understand this part, look to the song by Dylan (the one off the Bootleg Series is the best in my opinion). It's always been one of my favorites and is an incredibly compassionate yet tragic song that disguises itself as ridicule. Cheers :D, Spooknic
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Re: David Duchovny Hell or Highwater

Post by sir on Sat 25 Jul - 8:11




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