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X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

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X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 7 Jul - 5:46



Tuesday, July 7, 2015

X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)


Publisher: IDW PUBLISHING

(W) Kevin J. Anderson & Various

We all want to believe. The truth is still out there. The X-FILES have been reopened. Series creator Chris Carter has authorized new investigations into the weird, the strange, and the mysterious. New York Times Bestseller and multiple Bram Stoker Award® winner Jonathan Maberry brings together some of today's top storytellers for a series of anthologies featuring all-new case-files. Scully and Mulder continue their journey into darkness as they face aliens, monsters, shadow governments, and twisted conspiracies.

Item Code: JAN150526

In Shops: 7/29/2015

SRP: $19.99


PREVIEWSworld

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 7 Jul - 5:47



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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Tue 7 Jul - 5:50

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 28 Jul - 20:20

X-Files Is Out There

July 28th, 2015 by Max Allan Collins



The surprising news of a new, six-episode season of THE X-FILES featuring the original cast caused me to reflect on just how much Barb, Nate and I enjoyed the series, back in (as they say) the day. How we never missed an episode, even when we were so frustrated we wanted to throw a brick through the screen (“All will be revealed!”), and binge watching our laser discs that allowed some of the fan favorite episodes to be viewed again and again at home (amazing).

The series ran nine seasons and a major, big-budget motion picture was part of the mix, as well. Toward the end of the run, I was well-established as a writer of tie-in novels, and was approached by Harper Collins (the publisher, not some obscure cousin of mine) to develop a proposal for an original X-FILES novel.

In the business of writing tie-ins, Fox TV was notorious for being hard to work with, especially on the X-FILES franchise. But I was such a fan, I wanted to do it anyway. So for a period of about a year, off and on, I worked under the guiding hand of a Harper Collins editor to produce a fifty-page story treatment for a novel. This was entirely on spec, something I rarely do – but remember, I was a fan.

I came up with something I thought was very, very good, and so did the editor – a kind of X-FILES MEETS AMITYVILLE. We sent it in. We never heard a word. No rejection, much less an acceptance. That’s the writing biz – you drop something down a well and don’t even hear a splash.

By this time the series was in its final season, and not only did my tie-in never happen, no other X-FILES novels by anybody happened, either.

Then in 2008, a second film was produced: THE X-FILES: I WANT TO BELIEVE. Out of the blue, I was approached to write the novelization. I was thrilled, although I was apprehensive, because the movie was being produced in great secrecy, and the reputation of the X-FILES people being impossible to work with was a less than distant memory.

As it happened, I WANT TO BELIEVE was the single best experience I ever had, writing movie novelizations. I was one of a small handful of people (something like five) who had a copy of the script. The actors, I understand, had only their own script pages. The cinematographer had to read the script in a bank vault. But it was on my desk in Muscatine, Iowa.

Both Chris Carter and especially co-writer/producer Frank Spotnitz were terrific; I was frequently on the phone with the latter. If I had questions about wardrobe, I was sent daily costume sheets. I had photos from the set when the Internet had next to nothing. In one case, the editor of the film (Richard A. Harris, Academy Award winning editor of TITANIC and TERMINATOR 2) sat at his computer in Canada and described an action scene to me, frame by frame, that was not in my script. We were on the phone for two wonderful hours. Incredible.

I think I WANT TO BELIEVE is one of my best movie novels, but the film itself disappointed a lot of people. I liked it. It was an intelligent monster-of-the-week episode with some daring themes. The mood was right and the two leads were typically stellar. I remain thrilled that, sort of at the last minute, I became a part of THE X-FILES.

Now with the six-episode special-event series coming, a real push on X-FILES material is under way, particularly from IDW, with whom I have a long history. I was approached by the fine writer (also fine guy) Jonathan Maberry to contribute a story to an X-FILES anthology, TRUST NO ONE. I asked if I could do a novella and was given permission.

Now all will be revealed: I used my long-ago story treatment for the novel that never happened to write “The House on Hickory Hill.” Finally I got some money for writing it! Finally that story gets to be seen. And I think it’s a good one.

Also, a series of X-FILES audio books has been produced including the various vintage original tie-in novels and the two movie novelizations (also TRUST NO ONE). That means that suddenly a 2008 movie novel of mine has an audio book. I haven’t heard it yet, but admit I am pleased it exists and will delight at revisiting that underrated tale again, on some road trip to come.



It’s hard to know if THE X-FILES will be a “thing” again or just be a nostalgic blip on the pop-culture radar. The early ‘90s is suddenly a very long time ago. But THE X-FILES is a series that had an incredible impact on everything that came after. CSI, for example, played off a similar flashlights-in-the-dark vibe. As frustrating as the serialized nature of X-FILES could be, it set the stage for so many novelistic series to follow. Of current series, ORPHAN BLACK is steeped in the X-FILES approach.

I, for one, can’t wait to once again be thrilled and frustrated by this seminal series.


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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 28 Jul - 20:25



Title: The X-Files: Trust No One
Release: July 28, 2015
Paperback:
Audio MP3 CD:

Summary

We all want to believe. The truth is still out there. The X-Files have been reopened. IDW Publishing and series creator Chris Carter have authorized new investigations into the weird, the strange, and the mysterious. New York Times Bestseller and multiple Bram Stoker Award-winner Jonathan Maberry brings together some of today's top storytellers for a series of anthologies featuring all-new case files from the X-Files. Scully and Mulder continue their journey into darkness as they face aliens, monsters, shadow governments, and twisted conspiracies.

Alternate Covers



2015 Blackstone Audiobook

Resources


(946 x 1400 JPG)


(1000 x 1000 JPG)


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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Wed 29 Jul - 3:23

Thanks

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Wed 29 Jul - 16:32

JonathanMaberry • 4 months ago

IDW Publishing has been carrying the baton for X-FILES. They launched a successful and critically-acclaimed comic that is the official 'Season 10' of the show. And I'm editing a series of anthologies of all-new X-Files short stories, the first of which, X-FILES: TRUST NO ONE, debuts in May. It's not that we 'want to believe'...we have believed all along.

Finis Terre JonathanMaberry • 4 months ago

I'm curious about that project. Who wrote the short stories? Are they canon-friendly or not?

JonathanMaberry Finis Terre • 4 months ago

The stories are canon.
Here's the lineup for the first volume (there will be at least two more later this year).

1. Catatonia by Tim Lebbon
2. The Beast of Little Hill by Peter Clines
3. Oversight by Aaron Rosenberg
4. Dusk by Paul Crilley
5. Loving the Alien byStefan Petrucha
6. Non Gratum Anus Rodentum by Brian Keene
7. Backi n El Paso My Life Will be Worthless by Keith R.A. DeCandido
8. Paranormal Quest by Ray Garton
9. King of the Watery Deep by Timothy Deal
10. Sewers by Gini Koch
11. Clair de Lune by W.D.Gagliani and David Benton
12. It’s All in the Eyes by Heather Graham
13. The House on Hickory Hill by Max Allan Collins
14. Time and Tide by Gayle Lynds and John C. Sheldon
15. Statues by Kevin J. Anderson

Source


Jonathan Maberry

Confirmed lineup for X-Files: The Truth is Out There (volume 2 of my new series of all-original #XFiles stories). Look for this in February. Bev Vincent, David Liss, David Dave Sakmyster, David Farland (aka David Wolverton), Glenn Greenberg, Greg Cox, Hank Phillippi Ryan, Hank Schwaeble, Jon McGoran, Kami Marin Garcia, Kelley Armstrong, Kendare Blake, Rachel Caine, Sarah Stegall, and Tim Waggoner.

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Wed 29 Jul - 16:41

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Fri 18 Sep - 21:35


The X-Files: Trust No One Anthology – Mini Reviews – Part 1

09/08/2015 RainKnight

Never let it be said that IDW hasn’t been making the most of the X-Files license.  In addition to the ongoing The X-Files: Season 10/Season 11 comic series, a number of spinoff comic miniseries and annuals, and even a big-box board game, the publisher has now released its first X-Files short story anthology, featuring 15 new X-Files stories, each penned by a different author and spanning 25 years of Mulder and Scully’s history.

The authors chosen for this first volume (a follow-up is currently planned) consist of newcomers to the X-Files world as well as those who have a history with the property such as Kevin J. Anderson, author of some of the X-Files novels from the 90’s, and Paul Crilley, who recently wrote a number of the Lone Gunmen-focused X-Files Conspiracy crossover comics for IDW.

So, with over 20 years of X-Files fanfic floating around various internet archives, how does this official paperback version stack up?  Let’s find out!

I’ll be writing up little mini-reviews of each story as I make my way through the book and split my reviews up into three groups of five as I go so that each story can be addressed individually.  Then in Part 3, I’ll offer my final thoughts on the collection.  But to start, I’ll provide brief summaries for the first five stories and then offer more detailed thoughts (and nitpicks) after the jump!

Stories 1 – 5


1.  Catatonia

When four kids go missing and are found in a strange, catatonic state, an early Season 2 Mulder enlists the help of his former partner, Dana Scully, to get to the bottom of what’s happened to them and hopes that his current partner, Alex Krycek, won’t get in the way…

2.  The Beast of Little Hill

A late Season 2 Mulder and Scully take a little trip to investigate a small town with a history of UFO sightings and a couple of residents who claim to have dead aliens in their freezers.

3.  Oversight

Skinner must defend the X-Files division from falling victim to budget cuts and ends up solving an X-File of his own along the way…

4.  Dusk

In a story set in 2015, Mulder and Scully investigate the disappearance of some teenagers who had gone in search of a Twilight-inspired vampire.

5.  Loving the Alien

It’s early Season 5, Scully’s cancer is in remission, and Mulder doesn’t know if he believes in aliens anymore.  But when Scully loses contact with Mulder after he travels to a small town to investigate claims of an alien sighting, it’s up to her to solve the mystery of his disappearance and make sure they both make it out of there in one piece.

Now onto the reviews!
 __________________________

1. Catatonia by Tim Lebbon

Casefile story that held my attention throughout.  This story won points with me for taking place between Sleepless and Duane Barry, in the brief period when Mulder was partnered with Krycek and the X-Files division was shut down.  We get a rebellious Mulder and Scully investigating stuff that they shouldn’t be with Krycek tagging along uninvited.  The pacing was good and it had the feel of an episode of the TV show.  The paranormal element was appropriately mysterious, disturbing, and threatening.  For the shippers in the crowd, the shippiness level was pretty decent for a pre-abduction arc MOTW in that innocent-hand-holding and being-in-danger-together kind of way.

Nitpicks:  Mulder’s “You sound sexy when you’re angry” at the beginning of the story seemed a bit too direct for Mulder’s style of jokingly flirting with Scully, especially for taking place in early Season 2.  Might have worked in a certain tone of voice, but there wasn’t really any direction for how those lines should have been read.  It also seemed a little out of place for Krycek to call Mulder “Spooky,” since at this point he was still trying to earn his trust.  It’s also obvious that the author is from the UK, which isn’t generally a problem, but when British English wording occasionally sneaks into Mulder or Scully’s dialogue, it can take you out of the story.  Not a huge problem, but enough for me to take notice.  For this one, I’m not going to nitpick about the story’s October date conflicting with dates in the show because I’m pretty sure that the original date of Scully’s abduction was later retconned, anyway.

Overall it may not be anything groundbreaking, but it’s a solid casefile that’s made more memorable for taking place during a unique period in the show’s history.
__________________________

2. The Beast of Little Hill by Peter Clines

The second story again has Mulder and Scully doing their own thing, though this time as a bit of a recreational side project, at least on Mulder’s part.  The story takes place in small town and is a little more lighthearted than the first but still tugs at the heartstrings a bit at the end.  Mulder and Scully feel perfectly in place for the late Season 2 timeframe, and the author has their voices down well with their easy banter standing out as a highlight of the story.  Nothing especially shippy going on here, but like the first story, Mulder and Scully are together nearly the whole time, which is always a plus.
__________________________

3. Oversight by Aaron Rosenberg

In our third story, Skinner saves the X-Files from… accounting?  It was refreshing to see a story from Skinner’s perspective, and I liked the angle of him having to defend the X-Files division to the accounting department, because realistically, that was probably always a concern within the FBI, even before it came up in Requiem.  The timing of the “X-File” component of the story is perhaps a bit too convenient, but these are short stories (and this one is shorter than most of the others), so I’ll let that slide.  It was interesting trying to see Skinner think like Mulder, though maybe he solved this one a little too quickly and neatly.  Mulder only appears in this story via a phone conversation with Skinner, but it was interesting seeing Skinner use Mulder as a source more like Mulder might run something by the Lone Gunmen rather than letting him solve the case.

The biggest “oversight” (I’m sorry) in this story has to be in regard to the timeline.  All of the stories conveniently tell you when they take place at the very beginning, which, considering that these stories span anywhere from 1990 to 2015, is very useful for mentally putting yourself in the correct place within the series timeline when you first start reading.  This story says it takes place in December of 1994, which should place it shortly after Scully’s return from her abduction, but it feels like it should be more of a mid-series story with the way Skinner describes his thoughts on the value of the X-Files, at one point saying that his opinion toward it had changed “over the past few years.”  I suppose the author wanted to make sure it took place when Skinner was still definitely married to Sharon (who is mentioned a number of times, though she never actually appears), since she seems to be out of the picture after season 3, but I feel like placing this story in season 3 would still make more sense than season 2.

But all that isn’t really a big deal.  The one thing that really took me out of the story when I read it was when Skinner was apparently able to do a “quick search” for something on his 1994 cell phone.  The “quick” part would have been a challenge on a 2004 flip phone, but in 1994, you were lucky if you could get a quick dial-up connection on your computer to browse through some newsgroups, let alone get a decent signal just to make a phone call on a brick of a 90s cell phone.  (To be fair, there was a touchscreen cell phone released in 1994, the IBM Simon, that was capable of receiving email, but even so, Skinner wouldn’t have been able to search the internet on it.)  I’m kind of surprised that one wasn’t caught in editing, and I’m sure the author could have come up with some other method of Skinner identifying that quote that was more appropriate for the timeframe.  I may have gotten a little too hung up on that one, but I found it particularly jarring.
__________________________

4. Dusk by Paul Crilley

Our fourth story brings us to the present day (-ish… we’ll get to that in a moment), with a story set in 2015.  Paul Crilley is no stranger to writing The X-Files, as he was one of the forces behind IDW’s The X-Files: Conspiracy crossover miniseries, which was set loosely in the continuity of IDW’s Season 10 comics, and this story seems to take a cue from that with Mulder and Scully back at the FBI (and still definitely a couple).

This one is probably the most “fun” story so far, as Mulder and Scully investigate the disappearance of teenage girls who had been in search of a Twilight-inspired vampire.  Putting a paranormal twist on a pop-culture phenomenon feels very much in line with a number of classic X-Files episodes, and it’s fun to see that in a modern context.  The writing style also has a light, humorous tone to it, which definitely got a couple of laughs out of me.  While I was reading it, I had wondered if Crilley had written the X-Files/Transformers crossover issue that featured an unexpectedly amusing friendship between Langley and Bumblebee and wasn’t the least bit surprised when I confirmed that to be the case.  The story is also a bit self-aware at the end, essentially recognizing itself as sanctioned fanfic, but this fits in with the themes and tone of the story, so it doesn’t feel any more out of place than when the TV show playfully poked fun of the FOX network.

The only real nitpick I have again goes back to the timeline, though I didn’t find it quite as jarring as Skinner’s magical internet-connected 1994 cell phone.  The text before the story’s intro places the date at “16th May, 2015,” which would place it just a couple of months before the book’s July release.  Unfortunately, there are a couple of problems with this, most notably that this story specifically references the date in the text… and that ain’t it.   It’s 2015, sure, that’s mentioned specifically, but it is also very obviously winter, and the story’s teaser specifically states that it takes place three days before Christmas, with Mulder and Scully picking up the case the following Monday.  Of course, it also states in the text that they’re picking up the case two days later, which would be Christmas Eve, and also not a Monday.  However, two days after May 16th would have been a Monday.  So, the two legends match up, just not with the time of year presented in the text (the case’s proximity to Christmas isn’t particularly important to the story, but winter weather is mentioned several times).  I guess it’s not impossible for it to be snowing in May in the northeast, but it feels a bit off.  But perhaps the date was moved to May to avoid the other problem with a December 2015 date:  The fact that this future date (as of the book’s publishing) may not fit in with the ongoing X-Files continuity.  Chances are that when the story was originally written, news of an X-Files television revival had yet to be announced, and the only ongoing X-Files continuity was the Season 10 comics.  Of course, Season 10 ended back in June, and the status quo has now changed for Season 11, which would launch a month after the release of this story collection.  While it may still be possible to return to the old  setup of Mulder and Scully working together at the FBI, still in a stable relationship, it seems unlikely to happen within that timeframe, especially if Season 11 will eventually be tied into the upcoming event series.  Changing the date to May prevents any possible future continuity conflicts, at least as far as the IDW continuity is concerned, but it probably would have made more sense to set the story earlier in the year and remove the reference to Christmas so that the winter weather didn’t seem out of place.

But despite all that… don’t let the nitpicky date stuff take away your enjoyment of the story.  This is a fun read that stays entertaining throughout.
__________________________

5. Loving the Alien by Stefan Petrucha

The fifth story takes us to early Season 5 with a post-cancer arc Scully and a Mulder who’s not so sure if he believes in aliens anymore after his apparent deception in the Season 4 finale and 2-part Season 5 premiere.  The story is told in first person from Scully’s point of view and does a great job of addressing her state of mind when she loses contact with Mulder and needs to track him down and make sure he’s OK.  It’s something that’s happened several times in the series, and it’s interesting seeing it from the perspective of what’s going on in Scully’s head as she needs to puzzle out where he might be and what could have happened to him.  Scully is written well, and her state of mind and complicated feelings toward Mulder are perfectly fitting of the timeframe.  The only timeline-related nitpick I have is that 1997 seems a bit early for a GPS device to come along with a rental car.  GPS was obviously around, but I think it would still be a few years before it became common for public use (though perhaps it didn’t actually come with the rental and was FBI-issued).  But aside from that, the references, both to the show’s internal timeline and to the real world, seemed to fit well.  The mystery and the supernatural element were interesting, though the end felt a bit rushed, and I found myself wanting to see more interaction between Scully and Mulder once they were finally reunited.  It isn’t that the somewhat abrupt conclusion of the story followed by what basically amounts to a voiceover that tries to wrap things up and explain what was going on isn’t in line with a number of episodes of the TV show, but the more personal nature of the ending just left me wanting a tiny bit more.  That said, this has still been one of my favorites so far with strong writing and good characterization making me care about Scully’s journey every step of the way.

And that’s all for now!  So far, despite some nitpicks, these have been a fairly solid collection of case files.  From this first batch of stories, Dusk and Loving the Alien stand out as definite favorites.  Stay tuned for Part 2!

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Sat 19 Sep - 3:13

Thanks

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 8 Dec - 19:30



The X-Files: Trust No One Anthology – Mini Reviews – Part 2

09/22/2015 RainKnight

This is a collection of mini-reviews for the X-Files short story anthology, Trust No One.  In Part 1, I tackled the first five stories.  Here in Part 2, I’ll be reviewing stories six through ten.

Like last time, summaries first, then mini-reviews to follow.  We’ve got another Skinner-centric story this time around, an international adventure, and a team-up between Mulder and Arthur Dales.  Let’s get started!

Stories 6 – 10


6.  Non Gratum Anus Rodentum

Walter Skinner is reminded of a strange experience he had in Vietnam when a number of homeless people turn up dead in a series of violent attacks. But with the X-Files division closed after the end of Season 1, Skinner’s going to have to get to the bottom of this one on his own.

7.  Back in El Paso My Life Will Be Worthless

When another FBI agent is forced to work alongside Mulder and Scully to search for a serial killer who was thought to be put behind bars, he’ll need to learn to trust in their methods or discover the truth the hard way…

8.  Paranormal Quest

When a young woman’s heart literally explodes through her chest during the filming of a ghost-hunting reality show, Mulder and Scully are brought in to determine the cause of death and do their own take on the paranormal investigation.

9.  King of the Watery Deep

Mulder and Scully are out of their element when they fly out to investigate the disappearance of two Americans who have gone missing during a diving trip off the coast of Saudi Arabia in what appears to have been a violent attack.

10.  Sewers

In 1990, Mulder must team up with Arthur Dales in the hopes of locating four missing children who may have been taken by something not quite human.

Now onto the reviews!

Mini-Reviews


6. Non Gratum Anus Rodentum by Brian Keene

For the anthology’s sixth story, we see Skinner take the starring role once more. Mulder and Scully are mentioned, but don’t show up in person here. The X-Files are closed, and Skinner is torn between dealing with a frustrated Fox Mulder and that menacing figure who keeps smoking in his office, leading him to investigate a case with a potentially personal connection on his own time. We learn that Skinner’s paranormal encounters in Vietnam may not have been limited to near-death experiences and visions of elderly succubi. While the story itself takes place in mid-1994, we do get to flash back to a 19-year old Walter Skinner in Vietnam coming down from an acid trip, so that’s always a good time. Overall, it’s a solid story that helps to further explain how a hard-ass like Skinner can read through Mulder and Scully’s case reports on a regular basis without thinking they’re insane.
__________________________

7. Back in El Paso My Life Will Be Worthless by Keith R.A. DeCandido

This one is interesting as, though Mulder and Scully are featured prominently, it’s from the perspective of another FBI agent, and one who doesn’t think very highly of them. Agent Colt is reluctantly partnered with Mulder and Scully against his wishes, and whether or not he can learn to trust their instincts will directly tie into his ability to either solve the case or fall victim to it. It’s an interesting change of pace, and it’s fun to see a case from the point of view of one of the other agents who’s been working on it. Mulder and Scully are in character, and the case has a nice mystery to it that keeps you wondering until the end. It did feel like it could have been an episode of the show. My only real nitpicks here are that Agent Colt’s past connection to a certain other former FBI agent didn’t really seem necessary here, other than as an excuse for why Colt prefers to work alone and to make Scully feel uncomfortable, and again, the dreaded timeframe conflicts. Once again we have a date conflict between the April 3rd, 1994 date presented to us at the beginning of the story, which would place it in late season 1, and the March, 31st 1995 date referenced in the story itself (which would put the actual story in early April 1995) as well as references to various characters and cases from Season 2. Most likely, the year was just wrong in that initial intro text, as the April 3rd date works out nicely (if not a tad bit early in the context of the story), but it’s not the first time we’ve seen these conflicting dates, further making me question if they were placed in by the editor after the fact without making sure to double check the actual story text.
__________________________

8. Paranormal Quest by Ray Garton

I found this one to be a little predictible, but it was still an entertaining ride. It did a pretty good job of feeling like an episode of the show, just maybe not one of the most memorable. The mystery of how a woman’s heart could explode through her chest and a cast full of suspicious characters in a potentially haunted house was enough to keep me interested, and the sense of danger for Scully and Mulder does get ramped up at the end. The investigation ultimately plays out pretty straight, though. On the nitpicky side, we’ve got another date conflict, which I have to say is getting a little old at this point. Honestly, this story could take place at pretty much any point in the series where Mulder and Scully’s partnership reflects the old status quo, so 1997 for the year is fine, but the date in the intro text is December 2nd, and in the story text, it’s specifically referred to as a “hot and humid August day.” So, yeah. Other than that, though, not a bad story, and one that certainly doesn’t shy away from the gore.
__________________________

9. King of the Watery Deep by  Tim Deal

In this story, Mulder and Scully leave the US to investigate the disappearance of a couple of Americans in Saudi Arabia, adding a layer of culture shock to the investigation, especially for Scully. I thought the monster element was pretty solid and memorable, and I didn’t quite see the twist at the end coming, making me appreciate the various charaters’ actions and motivations more on a second readthrough. We find at least one of our agents in some pretty legitimate peril at the end, which played out really well, though I’m not sure the ending post-climax was quite as strong as what was leading up to it. Overall, I enjoyed this one. My major nitpick is that I think there was one page where secondary characters’ names were getting a little mixed up, which caused some brief confusion (and this wasn’t the first instance of that in this book), but that wasn’t enough to detract from my enjoyment of the story. The late season 7 timeframe for this one doesn’t seem to influence the story much (i.e. no secret sex going on here), but nothing seems out of place about it, either. Mulder shows some serious concern for Scully at the end, though, and that’s always nice.
__________________________

10. Sewers by Gini Koch

This was an interesting one. It’s our first story set entirely before the start of the show, and while there are a couple of flashbacks to Dales’ investigation in 1963, the main focus of the case is what’s going on in 1990, about a month after Mulder first met Arthur Dales in the episode Travelers. Here we have a still somewhat skeptical Mulder, now convinced of the existence of aliens, but not quite so sure about mutants and voodoo and the other things he is just now reading about while combing through these recently re-discovered X-Files cases. But when a missing persons case comes across his desk that bears a striking resemblance to an old X-File he’d stumbled upon, he goes to Dales for a consultation. The story serves as a nice gateway for how Mulder may have gone from being a little offbeat to being willing to believe in just about anything. Taking place in 1990, we do see some references to the flashback episodes Unusual Suspects and Travelers, such as Mulder’s smoking habit, and, of course, that infamous wedding ring. While I’m generally in the “ignore the wedding ring” camp, its two flashback appearances certainly make it fair game, and the author chooses to acknowledge it, but in a way that’s perhaps a little more shipper-friendly. (Spoiler: Mulder briefly married a friend to keep her from getting deported. They’re living together, but the references to her reminding him of his sister and developing a taste for sleeping on the couch seem to heavily imply that it’s non-sexual.)

The stakes get to be pretty high in this one, and while we know that Mulder and Dales obviously make it out alive, the case doesn’t necessarily have the happiest of endings. The story also involves the sexual mutilation of adolescent girls, so that may be upsetting to some readers. If this had been an episode of the TV show, I have a feeling that there were a few things in this one that wouldn’t have made it past the censors. Overall, the story mostly worked for me, though. I’m not sure if every element of Mulder’s life that was introduced was necessary to the story that was being told, but I generally enjoyed his pre-X-Files characterization. The only timestamp-related nitpick I have for this one is that the very first scene in the story is most likely supposed to be a flashback to 1963, but it starts off with the 1990 date stamp that applies to the majority of rest of the story, instead. Good for placing the story as a whole, but confusing for that initial scene.
 
And that’s another five stories down! I think my favorite from this batch may have been King of the Watery Deep since it made me want to read through it a second time after finding out what had been going on. I’m still leaning toward Dusk and Loving the Alien as my favorites overall, though. Just five more to go!

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 8 Dec - 19:40



The X-Files: Trust No One Anthology – Mini Reviews – Part 3

11/22/2015 RainKnight

Here’s the final collection of mini-reviews for the X-Files short story anthology, Trust No One.  I reviewed stories 1-5 in Part 1 and stories 5-10 in Part 2.  The book can be purchased on Amazon.com as a standard paperback, Kindle book, or audio book.

Again, we’ll start with the summaries, and then the full reviews can be found below.  Let’s finish this!

Stories 11 – 15


11.  Clair de Lune

Caught in a blizzard while escorting an extradited prisoner from Canada to the US, Mulder and Scully are warned that keeping the prisoner in their company could have deadly consequences.

12.  It’s All in the Eyes

Mulder and Scully are called in to investigate two murders on Halloween that appear to have been committed by a animatronic doll.

13.  The House on Hickory Hill

Mulder and Scully join the investigation into the kidnapping of a teenage girl from a supposedly haunted house when a ransom note is found signed in the blood of the long-dead former occupant.

14.  Time and Tide

After three teens go missing, Mulder and Scully are drawn to a strange pair of windows in the side of a cliff, one of which appears to transport anyone who climbs out of it into another time.

15.  Statues 

In Death Valley, a desperate man crashes his car and appears to turn to solid stone in front of a number of witnesses, leading Mulder and Scully on a search for their own real-life Medusa.

Now onto the reviews!

Mini-Reviews


11. Clair de Lune by David Benton and W.D. Gagliani

Note: This story was dedicated to the memory of Charles L. Grant who wrote the 1990s X-Files novels Goblins and Whirlwind and passed away in 2006. A sweet and fitting tribute.

This was one of the shorter stories, but it throws us right into the action as Mulder and Scully try their luck driving across the Canadian border after their flight back to the US is canceled. This seems to be a good place in the book for a nice claustrophobic story as Mulder and Scully are trapped in a snowstorm with a man who may or may not be a werewolf. I enjoyed the quick pace and the banter between Mulder and Scully, though some of the dialogue did seem to be worded a little awkwardly. I also had a hard time imagining Mulder especially, being so unsympathetic toward the prisoner when he believed that he could have been afflicted with such a condition, though to be fair, we don’t really get to see any of their interaction before we see him annoying the hell out of them with his screaming and mumbling on their car ride. This is another story that takes advantage of the print medium to depict things that are maybe a little gorier than what could have been shown on TV.

And now for our infamous timeframe nitpicks! The timeframe given at the start of the story is October of 1994, which would place it either during or just before Scully’s abduction, depending on if you go with the original or retconned timeline. Either way, though, Mulder and Scully wouldn’t have technically been partners during this time (this is also placed about a week before the date given to the first story in the book, where Mulder and Scully were not officially partners). That said, the timeframe seems to be placed rather arbitrarily. A late Season 1 episode is referenced, but other than that, this story could probably take place at any other point in the series where Mulder and Scully are reporting to Skinner.
__________________________

12. It’s All in the Eyes by Heather Graham

Okay, I have to admit, I had a hard time with this one. This is the first story in this collection that I just flat out didn’t like. Usually if I’m reading X-Files fanfic, the moment I see “Fox” and “Dana” being thrown around haphazardly, I’m out. Close the browser tab, time to move on. But I paid for these stories, damn it. And I’ve already committed to these reviews at this point, so I suffered through it. For you. I do it all for you.

The story begins, so imaginatively, the night before Halloween. A horror prop apparently comes to life and attacks a store clerk, and some people die. Oh, and the only thing in the vicinity of this store full of fancy Halloween decorations is, conveniently, an old church and graveyard. Dead bodies everywhere. Most of them were already dead, but whatever. Don’t worry, the “crime scene people” will take care of it, I’m sure.

I just couldn’t get into the writing. It felt… generic. The descriptions of the characters and setting lacked detail and everything felt very vague, as if to let the imagination fall back on tired cliches. The dialogue tended to be clunky and unnatural. Too many long sentences filled with unnecessary words that normal people don’t use in casual conversation. And the hyphens, my god. Hyphens everywhere. It’s a stylistic choice, I know, but it wasn’t working for me. All in all, the writing seemed like it was intended for a much younger audience than the rest of the book. The obvious seemed over-explained, but anything that could have used a bit of an explanation didn’t seem worth the effort. Too much telling, not enough showing.

In these reviews, I’ve tended to stay away from giving away the ending to most of these stories, as not to spoil them completely. But this one, I don’t even care. Weird snake-eyed alien slug things that control people? I think? And a portal… to… I don’t know, Hell, maybe? Their alien slug spaceship? I dunno, but they sure were evil, I guess?

And let’s talk about Mulder and Scully, or “Fox” and “Dana” as they’re so liberally referred to in the text. And you know what, I can do the occasional “Fox” and “Dana.” Those are their names, after all. But the moment you have Scully actually refer to Mulder as “Fox,” you just lose all credibility. And yeah, Mulder does call Scully by her first name occasionally, but three times in such a short story for no particular reason seemed a bit much. But these seemed like very surface-level depictions of Mulder and Scully that just didn’t ring true to the characters. Beside the awkward dialogue and random usage of first names, they seemed like flat and undeveloped characters, as if someone had heard the premise of the show and figured, “Okay, Mulder is supposed to believe everything he hears and Scully is supposed to deny it. But they’re such great partners!” The text tells us how good they are together, but it doesn’t really do anything to show it in a meaningful way. The story is missing anything like the cute, quirky moments we saw between them in Dusk or the heartfelt devotion that Scully demonstrated while looking for Mulder in Loving the Alien. It just feels shallow.

Oh, and we haven’t talked about the timeline yet! The year assigned to this story is 2009, making it one of the two stories in this collection to take place after the end of the series (and after I Want To Believe). With the other post-series story, Dusk, internal date issues aside, I felt that it worked because it otherwise lined up with IDW’s Season 10 comics’ continuity, in which Mulder and Scully rejoined the FBI sometime around 2013 after being prompted by a revived alien threat and concern for William’s safety. In this story, however, we get no explanation for why Mulder and Scully are back in the FBI in 2009. But with the history of these timestamps sometimes seemingly being assigned to stories at random, was 2009 even the intended setting for this story? There really doesn’t seem to be much to indicate a year, other than Mulder and Scully *may* be more than just partners here, though the exact state of their relationship isn’t explicitly mentioned. If you were to tell me that this story took place in late Season 7, I’d probably buy it more than 2009. Maybe the author heard that Mulder and Scully ended up together but didn’t bother to watch the last couple of seasons or second movie? I don’t know. Also, Scully apparently doesn’t believe in aliens here. By the end of the series, Scully most definitely believed in aliens. If she didn’t buy that these weird slug things were aliens, that’s cool. Knowing the history of aliens on The X-Files, I don’t really buy it, either. But the concept of an alien being that can take over someone’s body should be familiar to even a mid-series Scully, let alone Scully in 2009, if this actually is 2009.

Maybe I’m being too harsh. I think I could have forgiven most of these nitpicks on their own, but it ended up being a lot of little things that I found distracting enough to detract from my enjoyment. I’m trying to find some positives in here, and while the story didn’t really work at all for me, that doesn’t necessarily mean that everyone will feel the same way. There were a couple of nice lines here and there, I suppose, and probably some nice imagery in the beginning for those who really like Halloween decorations. And while the Mulder/Scully interaction fell flat for me, maybe it would work for some of the less picky shippers out there.

When I first picked up this book, this was the kind of story I was worried we might get, and honestly, I’m so grateful that we got 11 mostly very solid, well-written, well-characterized stories before we got to this one. As it stands, though, this one dud isn’t enough to prevent me from recommending the rest of the book. Moving on!
__________________________

13. The House on Hickory Hill by Max Allan Collins

I remember hearing that Max Allan Collins’ novelization of I Want to Believe received some mixed reviews (unrelated to the mixed opinions fans may have on the movie itself), but never having read that adaptation, I can’t really comment either way. I feel that Collins’ contribution to Trust No One, however, is a very solid entry and one of the meatier stories in the book. Mulder and Scully are in character, their dialog feels appropriate, and we’ve got some fun banter between them. This is another story centered around a potentially haunted house, but I personally enjoyed it a bit more than Paranormal Quest. While I had my suspicions about the true antagonist in this one early on, it didn’t feel quite as predictable as the earlier story, and I felt that everything really started clicking in place for me around the same time as it did for Mulder and Scully. The mystery takes its time to unravel and remains unsettling throughout. Overall, I really enjoyed this one. It may not be the most “fun” story in this book, but it had some nice moments between our agents, and it was a strong, dark mystery casefile.

Timeline nitpicks! (I should have just made this a standard section of each review.) I don’t recall if a specific year was given in the story for when the main action takes place, but the original murder in the house took place in 1979, so the 1997 date given at the beginning of the story would seem to be appropriate given this story’s timeline. The December 29th date, however, does contradict the show’s timeline, as Scully and Mulder should still be in San Diego during the events of the episode Emily, and none of that story arc plays any part in this. Of course, that doesn’t even really matter, because that initial date stamp directly contradicts the VERY FIRST LINE in the story, which clearly states that this story takes place in mid-November. Seriously, it’s stated like six words into the story. I’d really like to have a word with the editors.
__________________________

14. Time and Tide by Gayle Lynds and John C. Sheldon

I really wasn’t crazy about the characterizations in this one. Scully was almost unrecognizable. She attempted no scientific explanation for what was going on, barely challenged Mulder, and seemed to buy into the weirdness of the situation without question. Mulder’s insistence at the end that they make up a cover story also seemed extremely out of character for him, and for Scully to some degree, too. You would think that they would want to further investigate this phenomenon and try to figure out what caused it despite the danger that posed. It seems that they would owe that much to Gorman, who, by the way, didn’t seem to be bothered nearly enough by what had happened to him. I’m honestly not sure why Gorman seemed to be taking orders from Mulder in the first place. Their dialogue, while not particularly painful, generally seemed to be rather bland.

The one thing this story has going for it is the danger and mystery of the situation, and it was enough to keep me engaged, but there wasn’t really any kind of satisfactory pay-off. We never really find out what the main antagonist is, why it does what it does, why it has its particular weakness, what’s up with the time travel, or why the one window in the bunker is the gateway to it. It was an idea that had a lot of potential, but it seemed to get a bit convoluted. I don’t need to have everything explained, but the whole thing just felt underdeveloped. The X-Files rarely just has weird stuff going on for the sake of having weird stuff going on. Mulder “figures it out,” but without Scully bringing her science into it to give it some semblance of credibility, it just feels kind of hollow.

And not to disappoint, here’s this story’s timestamp mess: The date given at the beginning is January 12, 2000, which doesn’t even remotely match anything in the text. The story centers around three kids graduating from high school, and it’s clearly stated to be summer, so definitely not January. At one point Scully estimates that the date roughly 40 years in the future would be 2035, making this story take place closer to 1995 than 2000. Also, in the story it mentions that Scully has never been to Maine before, which would absolutely be untrue in 2000 (hi, Chinga), but could possibly have been true in 1995.

Anyway, not a horrible story, but it didn’t really come together at the end. I got really excited when I saw we would be dealing with time travel and was pretty disappointed by how it was executed. I really wanted to like this one, but the poor characterizations and convoluted, unresolved story elements significantly took away from a story that started out with a ton of potential.
__________________________

15. Statues by Kevin J. Anderson 

After a couple of shaky stories in this last set, the book ends on a high note with Kevin J. Anderson’s contribution. Anyone familiar with Anderson’s X-Files novels from the 90’s should have a pretty good idea of what to expect. The X-File is rock solid (I’m sorry), and Mulder and Scully are perfectly in character. The leading timestamp places this story in 1995, though really it could take place anytime during the majority of Mulder and Scully’s partnership.

The two agents stick together for this one, investigating as a team rather than splitting off on their own. We’ve got some fun banter here with plenty of inappropriate quips from Mulder. The pacing is of the standard MOTW variety, and it definitely feels like it could have been an episode of the show. Mulder and Scully find themselves in real danger at the end, leaving the reader wondering how they’re going to make it out alive. All in all, it’s a well-written, solid casefile, and a strong story to go out on.
 
The Verdict…

So, now that we’ve gotten through all 15 stories, was it worth it? In spite of a couple of duds and the baffling timestamp situation, the answer is still yes, without a doubt. The vast majority of stories were engaging and demonstrated expert knowledge of the show and its characters. It was really just “It’s All in the Eyes” and “Time and Tide” where Mulder and Scully felt jarringly unlike themselves, and those stories are probably the weakest because of it (again, a harsh blow to the otherwise fascinating premise of “Time and Tide”). For the most part, though, each story seemed like it would feel at home as an episode of the TV show (though some stories take advantage of the lack of television censorship with the occasional strong language and excessive gore), and I generally got the feeling that this was a collection written by fans for fans.

Since the stories are all stand-alone casefiles, even casual fans looking for a good collection of mystery stories should be able to jump right in without feeling out of place, though there are still a ton of specific references that the more hardcore fans should appreciate. We get nods to Samantha’s abduction, Scully’s cancer, Duane Barry, Skinner’s experiences in Vietnam, Mulder’s pre-X-Files smoking habit, as well as a handful of other references, though the stories themselves are mostly self-contained and don’t veer too far into the show’s ongoing mythology.

Is this collection going to satisfy your average fanfic addict? That’s probably going to be a matter of taste. If you just like a good casefile that’s paced out similarly to an episode of the show, then this will probably hit the spot. But a lot of fanfic readers are looking for the kind of stuff that wouldn’t have been aired, and you’re not going to find anything here that’s really outside the basic premise of the show. No novel-length epics, no smut, no crazy AU stuff, nothing that takes place completely outside of the characters’ lives as FBI agents. That said, despite focusing on casefiles, the stories we’re presented with here do have some nice variety. We have two stories starring Skinner, a story set during Krycek and Mulder’s brief partnership pre-Duane Barry, a story from the perspective of another FBI agent working alongside Mulder and Scully, a first-person story from Scully’s point of view, a story about Mulder and Scully escorting a prisoner over the Canadian border, Mulder and Scully working overseas, a pre-X-Files Mulder working with Arthur Dales, and a story set in 2015, presumably within the IDW X-Files: Season 10 continuity. The contributing authors may vary in style, but all are competent writers and storytellers, so while the stories might not hold a candle to some of the cream-of-the-crop fanfic recommendations, you’re probably in for a more consistent experience than blindly picking through a general fanfic archive.

While I’ve enjoyed the vast majority of the stories in this collection, my favorites remain the two stand-outs from my first set of reviews: The 2015-set “Dusk” for its humor (and bonus points for the rare glimpse of Mulder and Scully working together as a functioning couple, even if it’s mostly in the background), and the introspective Scully-centric “Loving the Alien,” for its heart.

Overall, I was pretty satisfied with this collection.  The weakest point was probably the editing, but the stories all generally felt like they could have been episodes of the show.  In the next volume, I’d like to see the authors branch out a little more and tackle some other characters and time periods that didn’t get much focus this time around.  In any event, I’m excited to see what a new batch of authors can bring to the table.

The next volume, The X-Files: The Truth is Out There, is currently slated for a March 10, 2016 release and can be preordered on Amazon.

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Wed 9 Dec - 1:15

Thanks

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Thu 17 Dec - 10:52

The X-Files: The Truth Is Out There Anthology Book Coming Next Year

Posted on December 17, 2015 by David Gelmini

With all the hype surrounding the new “The X-FilesTV series right now, the time has never been better for a new book in the franchise.

The X-Files: The Truth Is Out There is an anthology from IDW Publishing containing all new stories about the exploits of Mulder and Scully. Other than that, there isn’t a whole lot of information right now, but hardcore fans are probably already heading over to Amazon to pre-order a copy ahead of its release on March 10th of next year. Acclaimed horror author Jonathan Maberry is handling editing duties, as he also did on this year’s book The X-Files: Trust No One.

Synopsis:

Fox Mulder and Dana Scully are back in a chilling collection of all-new tales of dark secrets, alien agendas, terrifying monsters, and murderous madmen. Featuring original stories by bestselling authors Rachel Caine, Hank Philippi Ryan, Kelley Armstrong, Kami Garcia, Greg Cox, and many others. Edited by New York Times bestseller Jonathan Maberry (V-WARS).




Dread Central

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Thu 17 Dec - 10:56

Thanks

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Trust No One' an homage to all things 'X-Files'

Post by sir on Fri 26 Feb - 2:45

Trust No One' an homage to all things 'X-Files'


“Trust No One,” an anthology curated by Jonathan Maberry, is a love letter for fans, new and not so new, of the realm of “The X-Files.” The fifteen stories are, in essence, episodes themselves expanding on storylines and involving notable characters. This unabridged collection with a running time of just over 15 hours is adeptly read by Bronson Pinchot and Hillary Huber, and it flows so seamlessly that you may just experience lost time. As Maberry voices in its introduction, “Every author here has been hand-picked for their love of the show, their understanding of how ‘The X-Files’ ticks and for the quality of their storytelling.” The title may suggest to trust no one, however, trust that Maberry has placed you in capable hands.

A key element of success for “The X-Files” has been its delicate balance of science fact with science fiction. With each outlandish case, or creature, there lies enough truth to not completely discount the supernatural. Now, combine these with a Hitchcockian level of suspense, and you have a winner. “Trust No One” abounds with these same characteristics, Mulder/Scully banter, as well as seemingly impossible creatures, and situations that can only exist in “The X-Files” universe. This collection touches on minor, yet unforgettable characters, such as: Assistant Director Walter Skinner, Alex Krychek, the Cigarette Smoking Man and Arthur Dales.


"Dusk" by Paul Crilley, who penned the “The X-Files: Conspiracy” comic, brings a plot that feels like “Twilight” meets “The Blair Witch Project.” This story reads like an episode of “The X-Files,” with believable characterizations, and welcomed internal monologues. "Loving the Alien" by Stefan Petrucha, another contributor to “The X-Files” comics, contains an Agent Scully centric storyline that continues an arc established in the television show. Here, she is still recovering from a major illness, yet Mulder has gone missing, leaving Scully the only one who can locate him. Petrucha’s tale wonderfully demonstrates Mulder’s influence on Scully’s investigative methods and deductive reasoning. Further recommended selections are, "The House on Hickory Hill" by Max Allan Collins, and "Statues" by Kevin J. Anderson, an author of early novelizations of “The X-Files.”

Since 2008, lead actors David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson have certainly not been idle. Aside from appearances on stage, as well as on screens big and small, they also have had their own turn as authors. In 2015, Duchovny penned “Holy Cow,” which is perhaps the first novel narrated entirely by a cow. In addition to author and actor, Duchovny can add musician to his resume having released an album titled “Hell Or Highwater,” which can be streamed using Lawrence Public Library’s new digital service, Hoopla. Gillian Anderson, when not appearing on stage as Blanche DuBois in “A Streetcar Named Desire,” has published two novels with Jeff Rovin: the first part of a trilogy known as the “Earthend Saga.” This fall, she will release another book titled, “WE: A MANIFESTO FOR WOMEN EVERYWHERE,” co-written with journalist Jennifer Nadel. “WE” is a call to empower women toward living a happier and more fulfilled life. Even William B. Davis, the actor known for playing the Cigarette Smoking Man in The X-Files, has penned a memoir! Also, two Young Adult prequel novels focusing on pivotal turning points in Fox Mulder and Dana Scully’s teenage years have just recently been announced this month. These will be written by Kami Garcia and Jonathan Maberry, respectively, and are slated for a simultaneous release in January 2017. Coincidentally, “The Truth is Out There: Book Two,” released this month and again curated by Jonathan Maberry, features Kami Garcia among many others.

Akin to the television program, “Trust No One” wields the power of suggestive storytelling like that found in campfire stories. Over the years, the show’s creator, Chris Carter, has maintained that the mere suggestion of the unnatural lurking in the everyday provokes a more powerful mental image than those a camera, or computer, could ever convey. This is what makes an audiobook format a successful choice for this anthology. Jonathan Maberry states, “These are not tales to pass a casual afternoon. These are tales with teeth and claws and, well, you’ll have to discover that for yourself;” I am inclined to agree. With the release of “Trust No One,” as well as “The Truth is Out There,” a collective breath brings new life into an area that bookish fans of the program have sorely missed. So, whilst avid fans wait with bated breath as to the possibility of more episodes or a potential film, the future remains, as ever, unexplained.

''— Ilka Iwanczuk writes for the Lawrence Public Library.''

2.ljworld.com

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Fri 26 Feb - 3:03


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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Thu 31 Mar - 20:52

THE X-FILES TRUST NO ONE EDITED BY JONATHAN MAYBERRY



Copyright 2015.

A new anthology of X-files stories.

CATATONIA by Tim Lebbon.

1994 Lynott Sound, Massachusetts. Young teenagers are found in a catatonic state. The cause seems to be a mysterious blue light of possible alien origin. The US army also has an involvement. The first story was a fairly good one to start off the book.

THE BEAST OF LITTLE HILL By Peter Clines.

1995 Little Hill, Missouri. Mulder decides to stop over after an assignment to the town of Little Hill the sight of an alleged UFO crash back in 1969. Two farmers have tourist trap exhibits of captured aliens that look very fake. A feud between the two farmers results in one of the exhibits actually coming to life an terrorizing the town. This was a good story that captured the characters and feel of the series.

OVERSIGHT by Aaron Rosenburg.

1994 Washington, D.C. Assistant director Walter Skinner is faced with the X-files being closed by an agency bean counter for being a waste of money. This accountant is later attacked at home by a mysterious attacker who can cause total darkness. Now Skinner is confronted with his own X-file to solve if he wants to save both the accountant’s life and the X-files. An interesting story featuring Skinner as the main character.

DUSK By Paul Crilley.

2015 Castle Bluff, New Hampshire. Young girls are disappearing by what is reported as a vampire character from a popular book series. The author of the series lives in the town and has a connection to his father who was a Nazi that was conducting experiments on a real vampire. This is a really good story that is obviously satirizing the Twilight Series and our modern pop culture in general.

LOVING THE ALIEN By Stefan Petrucha.

1997 Florence, South Carolina. Mulder has gone missing while investigating sightings of UFOs and an alien. The investigation leads to a disgruntled former CIA employee involved in mind control experiments that lost his job because of Mulder. This was a fascinating story that had a totally unexpected ending.

NON GRATUM ANUS RODENTUM By Brian Keene.

1994 Washington, D.C. Walter Skinner comes across a local news story that Mulder is investigating on the side. He notices in the picture an old buddy from the Vietnam War. This buddy was a tunnel rat in the war and Skinner saved him from what looked like a human rat. Now that rat type creature is back in the sewers of Washington. Another Skinner story and a very interesting one. One we get a glimpse of him as a young man back in Vietnam.

BACK IN EL PASO MY LIFE WILL BE WORTHLESS By Keith R.A. DeCandido.

1994 El Paso, Texas. Special agent Jack Colt has been investigating a serial killer. Each time he thinks he catches the killer a new suspect appears. Now Mulder and Scully are assigned to help and Mulder of course suspects a shapeshifter. This was a good story.

PARANORMAL QUEST By Ray Garton.

1997 Redding, California. A woman’s heart explodes from her chest. This woman was part of a family whose haunted house is being filmed for the popular reality series Paranormal Quest. The investigation leads to a nondescript female production assistant that has telekinetic powers. She was being used by the show’s producer and now her powers are out of control. A good story that satirized those paranormal reality series.

KING OF THE WATERY DEEP By Tim Deal.

2000 Saudi Arabia. A consulate worker disappears with a friend on a boating trip. While the local authorities suspect Somali pirates there are reports of a fish-man that is involved which is why Mulder and Scully are assigned the case. The investigation leads to an ancient Sumarian cult that worships the fish man and demands human sacrifice. An interesting story that takes place in an a new setting.

SEWERS by Gini Koch.

1990 Buena Vista, California. Reports of an alligator man that is kidnapping young boys. It leads to a similar X-file case from the 1950’s. A story before Mulder met Scully and was on the X-files.

CLAIR DE LUNE By David Benton and W.D. Gagliani.

1994 Ottawa, Canada. Mulder and Scully are escorting a mob witness back to the states to testify and must stop at an isolated motel in a snowstorm. The prisoners goes on about the danger from a werewolf which turns out to be true. The authors dedicate this story to the memory of Charles Grant. Sad to hear he pasted away. I know I was hard on him and but I do have fond memories of reading his books. I suppose its ironic that this is my least favorite story in the anthology.

IT’S ALL IN THE EYES By Heather Graham.

2009 Purgatory Pass, Massachusetts. Workers at a Halloween novelty shop are killed by life size dolls of the popular Caitlin Corpse. The investigation leads to aliens that crash landed and are looking for bodies to inhabit to survive. A creepy story that has the feel of an X-files episode.

THE HOUSE ON HICKORY HILL By Max Allan Collins.

1997 Banewich, Massachusetts. A popular author moves his family into a haunted house to write a book about it. Years ago a murder occurred there and now strange sightings and blood from the walls occur. The older daughter is kidnapped and clues point to the deceased murderer. This was a fascinating story with a twist ending that I never saw coming.

TIME AND TIDE By Gayle Linds and John C. Sheldon.

2000 Portland, Maine. On a small tourist island three teenagers go missing. A man calls Mulder that is monitoring a passage to another dimension. Now Mulder and Scully go to this other dimension to rescue the teens from the creature that lives there. This was an interesting story but it was out of character. Mulder is actually actively covering up this phenomenon which just doesn’t fit the character.

STATUES By Kevin J. Anderson.

1995 Death Valley, California. A prospector arrives at a hospital and quickly turns to stone. The trail leads to an artist who found a cave with water that turns organic tissue to stone. He has been turning people to stone and selling it as works of art. They saved the best for last. It was great to read another Kevin Anderson story.

Wow actually reading something fairly new. Anthologies are usually hit or miss with stories and I suppose that is the case with this book. The stories even the weakest ones were entertaining and it was great to read some new stories. There was aliens, UFOs, vampires, werewolves, ghosts, monsters, government cover ups, Cigarette Smoking Man, Krychek(remember him?), CIA mind control, Nazis, and general weirdness. Definitely for any fan of the series.

March 27, 2016


THE BOOKS THAT TIME FORGOT.

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Fri 1 Apr - 3:08

Thanks

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Wed 20 Apr - 8:41

Did you guys see this yet (don't remember if I've shared it)? I wrote a short story detailing Gibson Praise's efforts to restore the Syndicate, and influence Agent Mulder's eventual return to action, as a sort of prequel to THE X-FILES: SEASON 10.

Not sure when this third X-Files Anthology volume is coming out yet, but this is the cover art.




Joe Harris


Last edited by jade1013 on Thu 1 Sep - 7:19; edited 1 time in total

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Wed 20 Apr - 8:52

Thanks

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X-Files Secret Agendas

Post by sir on Mon 20 Jun - 8:57

X-FILES SECRET AGENDAS



Publisher: IDW PUBLISHING

(W) John Gilstrap & Various

The truth is still out there! FBI Special Agents Dana Scully and Fox Mulder go hunting in the shadows for dangerous truths in this new collection of original never-before-published tales of the X-Files. Edited by NY Times bestseller Jonathan Maberry and featuring heart-stopping stories by some of today's hottest writers of mystery, thriller, science fiction and horror

Item Code:  

JUN160459

In Shops: 9/14/2016  

SRP: $19.99

Previewsworld.com

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 20 Jun - 9:18


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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 26 Jul - 12:06

Forthcoming Works & WIP Release Schedule 2016-2017

Published on July 26, 2016 by Bryan Schmidt

As I revise this site and get back to blogging and regular updates (soon, I hope), I thought I could start by updating you on my various forthcoming projects and works in progress and their release dates (as I know them).

So here they are. As you can see, 2017 will be my busiest year ever as not only editor but author, too.

Forthcoming works 2016:



“Border Time” by myself and Kate Corcino in THE X-FILES: SECRET AGENDAS, edited by Jonathan Maberry (IDW), September 27, 2016


Read more here: Bryan Thomas Schmidt

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Tue 26 Jul - 12:07

Thanks

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Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

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