The House of David Duchovny [Forum]
Hello,

To access the forum, you must have registered,
then to access the entire forum you must have introduced yourself.

Looking forward to post with you.

X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Page 3 of 3 Previous  1, 2, 3

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 5 Dec - 10:05

REVIEW: The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘Border Time’

DECEMBER 5, 2016 ~ TONY BLACK


Tony Black looks at the eighth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘Border Time’…




Written by Bryan Thomas Schmidt & Kate Corcino


Edited by Jonathan Maberry


The eighth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas plays it straighter than many of the other tales in the anthology, which have in some places attempted to mix up the storytelling with X-Files which think outside the box. ‘Border Time’ is a very solid, standard kind of story which would have fitted perfectly well as a mid-season episode. Co-written by Bryan Michael Schmidt & Kate Corcino, and set roughly around the third season of the series, it balances a rather traditional investigation for Mulder & Scully as a dead young woman turns up mutilated on the US side of the Mexican border, with an attempt to get under the skin of Mulder’s obsession and lightly throw in some mytharc along the way. It’s only partially successful, unfortunately


The main problem is that the repeated references to Samantha and Mulder’s personalizing of cases just doesn’t feel earned. He did this more than once in episodes such as ‘Oubliette’ or of course ‘Paper Hearts’, but in both cases the writing was either subtle or Samantha’s abduction directly connected to the story – here it feels like a reference point being forced, and given Schmidt & Corcino don’t tell the story from Mulder’s perspective & inner monologue, it often feels like the writer pointing and going “look, like this like Samantha, look!”. It becomes jarring after a while.


Equally not really clicking is the mytharc link to what otherwise seems to be an organized murder operation, and again the inclusion of a fan-favourite mythology character only serves to highlight how much he doesn’t fit tonally with everything that has preceded his appearance. It feels an odd & unsatisfying twist the story didn’t need, again mainly there to underline the attempts to connect to Samantha.


It’s unfortunate because ‘Border Time’ does have some good moments and character interactions, with Schmidt & Corcino getting the voices and actions of Mulder & Scully down well. They touch on the whole aspect of border patrols, illegal workers and the plight of young women being prey to abuse in the area, and supporting characters such as Lupo are well drawn as the investigation deepens – it’s purely from a narrative perspective where it goes wrong and trying to shoehorn an emotional connection to Mulder’s psychology into the story.


Rating: 6/10


Thecastblog.wordpress.com

sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 5 Dec - 10:06


jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 12 Dec - 9:16

REVIEW – The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘A Scandal in Moreauvia, or The Adventure of the Empty Heart’

DECEMBER 12, 2016 ~ TONY BLACK

Tony Black looks at the ninth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘A Scandal in Moreauvia, or The Adventure of the Empty Heart’…




Written by Nancy Holder


Edited by Jonathan Maberry


In the ninth story of The X-Files: Secret Agendas, writer Nancy Holder takes a big big risk by bringing back one of the show’s most reviled characters: Inspector Phoebe Green! ‘A Scandal in Moreauvia, or The Adventure of the Empty Heart’ is without doubt not just a curio but one of the most entertaining stories in this anthology, primarily because it really strives to do something different. Holder not only takes Mulder & Scully out of their comfort zone but even out of their country, placing them in England for the kind of tale it’s a shame, if understandable, the TV series never actually did – connect Mulder back with an even greater tether to his 19th century inspiration, Sherlock Holmes, and touch again on his British Oxford education roots. It doesn’t quite stick the landing, but Holder’s story stands out in several unique ways.


Firstly, she really nails these characters, perhaps more than any other writer has quite done yet in this anthology. Holder gets that blend of dogged determination mixed with dry sarcasm in Mulder down pat, as she does the continued exasperation of Scully, who serves as the perspective for this story. Holder really plays up on the visible dislike Scully had for Phoebe during ‘Fire’, which this can be considered a semi-sequel to; with the comparison being much more on the nose to Sherlock and Irene Adler, down to the cod-Dr Moreau, 19th century literature title, the myriad of Holmes references, and of course a major chunk of the story taking place on Dartmoor. Phoebe is as slippery and annoying as she was when Amanda Pays played her, but that just means she’s written well, and arguably the first half of the story as Phoebe leads Mulder into a particularly paranormal case is the strongest.


Holder perhaps falls down by trying too hard to connect this back to the mytharc, which oddly enough has been a recurring problem in many of the stories in Secret Agendas. She makes a point of setting this early in Season 3, tethering it pointedly to the ‘Anasazi’ trilogy and trying to connect the thematic element of the story to Mulder’s brush with death in the boxcar and his ‘rebirth’, but it feels enormously forced in many places. The whole discovery Mulder & Scully make smacks of Fight the Future too and, oddly, almost doesn’t seem to fit their Sherlockian surroundings. It’s almost as if Holder had a different kind of story in mind and wanted to wrong foot us, when perhaps the original narrative might have been more rewarding. It’s a shame, as the promise of the story doesn’t quite pay off.


Regardless, ‘A Scandal in Moreauvia’ beyond its narrative problems and fan service is among the strongest penned in the Secret Agendas anthology, and just for the fact she gets away with bringing Phoebe Green back, Nancy Holder deserves a round of applause!


Rating: 7/10


Thexcastblog.wordpress.com

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 12 Dec - 9:18


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 19 Dec - 10:03

REVIEW: The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘Stryzga’

DECEMBER 19, 2016 ~ TONY BLACK

Tony Black looks at the tenth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘Stryzga’…


Written by Lauren A. Forry

Edited by Jonathan Maberry


So far in The X-Files: Secret Agendas we’ve had a range of stories that attempt to get under the skin of Mulder & Scully, while both weaving in mytharc elements and more often than not, deliberate connections to X-Files events of the past. ‘Stryzga’, from writer Lauren A. Forry, is the first one to truly get the mixture right for my money, and for all of these tales–most of which have been great thus far–this one feels like an X-File of old we might see on TV the most.

Set during the first season of the show, it takes place just after the bleak ending of ‘Darkness Falls’ where, you’ll remember, Mulder & Scully only just got out of woods alive (literally). Forry intentionally chooses to play on that fact as she weaves a story that sends the duo back into the woods, in a way that feels worthy and un-intrusive.

You have a solid gribbly in the mix for this story too, as the titular Stryzga is a Slavic monster of legend which appears to have killed a Polish national in a former nature reserve, and Mulder delivers one of his classic projector lectures to Scully whilst throughout the story projecting his own concern about whether she should be back on field duty so soon, after she came off the tree bug attack in ‘Darkness Falls’ in a much worse way than he; it didn’t necessarily need any focus, as we took them both being fine for granted come the next episode, but Forry plays this beat naturally enough for it to *be* natural and provide a central level of depth to their burgeoning partnership which gives the story ever so slightly more weight.

Beyond that, it’s a damn fine monster of the week story, essentially, with a few twists and turns along the way in terms of questioning man’s abhorrent treatment of nature and some creepy secrets involving children and bizarre radiation tests. Crucially, Scully always provides a scientific explanation or attempt at one when Mulder is off theorising about two hearted monsters with double teeth, in precisely the way the show would do. It builds to a relatively swift but satisfying conclusion that ends on a comic beat but with the door still open. It’s among the more traditional stories in this anthology but that really works to its benefit – with fine writing from Lauren A. Forry, who nails characterisation as well as

It builds to a relatively swift but satisfying conclusion that ends on a comic beat but with the door still open. It’s among the more traditional stories in this anthology but that really works to its benefit – with fine writing from Lauren A. Forry, who nails characterisation as well as story, it’s not the most out there or inventive of the volume but it could well be among mfavoriteses.

Rating: 8/10

Thexcastblog.wordpress.com

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 19 Dec - 10:07


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Tue 27 Dec - 6:00

REVIEW: The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘An Eye for An Eye’

December 27, 2016 ~ Tony Black

Tony Black looks at the eleventh story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘An Eye for an Eye’…


Written by George Ivanoff
Edited by Jonathan Maberry

Hands down, this is the weirdest and creepiest story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas. No question. ‘An Eye for an Eye’ is short, sharp, punchy and really really strange from George Ivanoff, revolving around something we take for granted on a daily basis – our precious two eyes. Set during the first season much like the last story, Ivanoff begins in media res with Mulder right in the middle of an incredibly unnerving situation as some kind of bizarre creature made up of eyes begins sucking his eyeball out of his socket, before snapping us back in time to how the agents came to face such a truly weird creature, amongst the weirdest The X-Files has ever given us.

Ivanoff’s writing is to the point but really engaging throughout, reading fast and fun, and he manages to nail Mulder’s headlong exuberance to believe the weirdest explanation in contrast to Scully’s measured response, as they begin investigating people from wildly different backgrounds who’ve had one of their eyes sucked out of their heads, before forgetting how it happened in the first place.

It’s a quick tale which is more interested in getting us to the climax than dwelling on the investigation, with Ivanoff’s writing being heavily dialogue-based as Mulder & Scully meet the victims (but he does get in a nice homosexual couple, and a welcome touch given this is set mid-90’s) and then find the perp, but it’s the encounter Mulder specifically has when they do come face to face with the monster here that makes the story; it’s disturbing, very weird, and suggests historical child abuse may be a causal factor, plus it’s all tied in with Biblical & religious overtones, which you can imagine given the title. The ending is icky & trippy and would really give you the shivers if you saw it on screen, which any good X-File should do.

Another fine story here from Secret Agendas, which rockets along from George Ivanoff and delivers a supremely creepy and strange villain, good character interactions, sprightly plotting and a memorable climax. ‘An Eye for an Eye’ may also make you wonder if you should ever wear glasses ever again!

Check in later this week for an exclusive interview with George Ivanoff about his story!

Rating: 8/10


An X-Files Podcast Blog

_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Tue 27 Dec - 6:15

Thanks

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 2 Jan - 8:36



REVIEW: The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘Kanashibari’


JANUARY 2, 2017 ~ TONY BLACK




Tony Black looks at the twelfth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘Kanashibari’…

Written by Ryan Cady

Edited by Jonathan Maberry


Now here’s an urban myth I’ve heard of before – the Kanashibari, a terrifying Japanese folk tale of an old hag who haunts the dreams of people in what would be referred to as night terrors. Ryan Cady captures the concept of such a creature well in ‘Kanashibari’, the twelfth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas, clouding the very notion of what reality means in terms of the dream world and how potentially said unconscious can hurt us in the real world. In that sense it beats similarities with Season 2’s ‘Sleepless’, but tonally and in terms of atmosphere shares as much in common with Ringu and other Japanese horror tales. Cady manages to craft a solid tale which remains, to a degree, open to interpretation.

You see it’s never quite clear whether we’re dealing here with a genuinely supernatural occurrence, a terrifyingly described ‘Old Hag’ with a shock of hair and white face which creeps onto and attacks you while you sleep, or a chemically induced series of hallucinations tapping into that fear response within REM sleep, and Cady does a very good job of letting Scully have as strong an explanation for what’s happening here as Mulder himself does, he quick to leap to the fact a spiritual evil presence is lurking beyond the dream world.

Whether or not the Kanashibari is real, Cady manages to craft some genuinely unsettling moments for Mulder & Scully as they are assailed by terrifying dreams, in strongest written parts of the story; the whole piece is less effective when dabbling in the supporting Japanese father/son difficulties in Los Angeles, though Cady nicely suggests the City of Angels isn’t quite as glorious as it seems, given how Scully reacts to the heat in November. It has nice incidental touches.

What ‘Kanashibari’ also has going for it is, arguably, the best final scene in Secret Agendas, as Ryan Cady weaves a wonderful little stinger at the end, just when you think everything has been relatively wrapped up in a neat little bow. It leaves you going ‘ooooh’ in the best tradition of The X-Files, in a way not every story in this anthology has done. It deserves applause for that and some evocative writing along the way.

Look out for our exclusive interview with Ryan Cady about his story later this week.

Rating: 7/10

Thexcastblog.wordpress.com

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 2 Jan - 8:38


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Sat 7 Jan - 10:14

IN REVIEW: THE X-FILES ANTHOLOGY, VOL 3: SECRET AGENDAS
Captures the thrills of the series in sensational fashion.



The X-Files Anthology, Vol. 3: Secret Agendas edited by Jonathan Maberry

Published by IDW Publishing, October 12, 2016. Oversized paperback of 362 pages at $19.99.


The cover: F.B.I. agents Dana Scully and Fox Mulder, as played by Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny, have their guns out to take down someone, or something, that threatens society. Below them is a gigantic white X that is being blurred to the right. Underneath this is the title Secret Agendas in stark red, with editor Jonathan Maberry’s name below that. Any cover that features these two agents makes my heart sing, so I love this cover. Overall grade: A


The premise: From the back cover, “The truth is still out there! FBI agents Dana Scully and Fox Mulder go hunting in the shadows for dangerous truths in this new collection of original never-before-published tales of The X-Files.” All I need to read is “new” and I’m fully on board. I really enjoyed the first volume, Trust No One, that came out in 2015, so I’m excited to read more tales of this fantastic pair. Overall grade: A+

The characters: Dana Scully and Fox Mulder are put through the paces during their investigations, from 1993 through 2015. A knowledge of where they are in their relationship is not necessary to enjoy the tales, but it does give the reader who’s familiar with them a little more flavor. Scully continues to be the skeptic to Mulder’s implausible assumptions, yet Fox is often right in his conclusions. I loved this pair when they first debuted on television and I continue to thrill at any of their new outings. There are also a few appearances by Skinner and the Cigarette Smoking Man. I’m also happy to see these two appear in agents’ exploits. Overall grade: A+

The stories: Since is a collection of short stories specifics can’t really given about any of the fifteen tales, so only the most basic comments will be made about them. The first story is “Seek and You Will Find” by John Gilstrap. This is a very different X-Files tale with a doorway leading to someplace unexpected. I didn’t like this story because it seemed too far fetched, even for these agents. “Perithecia” by Andy Mangels reads like a lost episode: great set up, freaky twist, excellent science vs. supernatural argument, and a perfect ending. This is a four star story. Next up is “Give Up the Ghost” by Jade Shames with the agents in a fantastic supernatural tale. I loved this one and it had me hearing one character’s particularly haunting speech pattern long after I had read it. Another super tale is “Transmissions” by Marsheila Rockwell and Jeffrey Mariotte. This, too, is like a lost episode with murders happening in a rural area for seemingly no reason. The action is surprising and the ending awesome. I didn’t enjoy “Desperately Seeking Mothman” by Jim Beard because the threat of the antagonist wasn’t palpable and the conclusion was too pat. A bit better is “Love Lost” by Yvonne Navarro which has a cool mystery undone by a very unsurprising ending. However, I was completely taken by “Thanks and Praise” is by Joe Harris, who has been the writer of the current comic book adventures of The X-Files. His story receives the only preface, as it was written before the latest season of the series was ever considered. It is outstanding and makes me wish that this was an actual television episode. Anything written by Harris is worth checking out. “Border Time” by Bryan Thomas Schmidt and Kate Corcino is another strong tale. This features a disappearance that leads to hidden agendas with sinister implications. Saying anything more would ruin this. Nancy Holder, a tremendous writer (find her Buffy the Vampire Slayer books!), is responsible for “A Scandal in Moreauvia, or The Adventure of the Empty Heart”. It is a combination of aliens, Sherlock Holmes, and a lost love which combine to make this an outstanding tale. Again, a story a reader would wish was filmed. “Stryzga” by Lauren A. Forry shows the lurking danger of a summer camp, and it has nothing to do with hockey masks — it’s so much better. Next up is “An Eye for an Eye” by George Ivanoff. This has a killer in the traditional serial killer mode, but with something a little extra to make the insane every crazier. Ghosts or something more deliver some good thrills in “Kanashibari” by Ryan Cady. I really like X-Files stories that delve into other cultures and this one satisfied my supernatural sweet tooth. “All Choked Up” by Lois H. Gresh has murder in the government involving the agents with the Cigarette Smoking Man not far behind. I like the idea of the threat in this tale, but it didn’t come off strong enough. Mass hysteria or something else provides the chills in “Along the Scenic Route” by Lucy A. Snyder. Stories that start small and blossom into a major event are always fun and Snyder pulls this off handsomely. Outstanding, through and through. The final tale was not a strong one: “Grandmother Black Hands” by Weston Ochse. This one didn’t work for me because it seemed drawn out and the conclusion anticlimactic. Overall grade: A

The final line: This is a must-read for fans. Captures the thrills of the series in sensational fashion. I hope that IDW does a fourth volume soon. Recommended. Overall grade: A

Scifpulse.net

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Sat 7 Jan - 10:16



_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 9 Jan - 10:13

REVIEW – The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘All Choked Up’

JANUARY 9, 2017 ~ TONY BLACK

Tony Black looks at the thirteenth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘All Choked Up’…




Written by Lois H. Gresh


Edited by Jonathan Maberry



Sometimes you get an X-Files story that just doesn’t feel like The X-Files, and Secret Agendas serves one up here in ‘All Choked Up’ from Lois H. Gresh. There’s just something as a bit too pulpy and on the nose about Gresh’s story that feels off in terms of Chris Carter’s series, and while it’s nice to see Scully once again get the focus (indeed in first person as well), her inner monologue didn’t always sound like you’d imagine Scully would; moreover, certain interactions between our leads with characters such as Skinner (who feels too wily & playful) and the Cigarette Smoking Man (who comes across too cartoonish) just don’t track. Dare I say it, the whole story feels very much like an X-File written by someone who hasn’t seen much of The X-Files.


Whether or not that’s true, it’s hard to judge, and I wouldn’t serve to presume. Gresh writes straight up, pulls no punches, and there’s nothing especially wrong with her prose, it’s her story that for me was full of problems. For example, Mulder & Scully talk throughout about the ‘Syndicate’ as if it’s common knowledge as a name like they’re talking about ‘SPECTRE’, say – they just didn’t do that in the show, it wasn’t a reference point. Also, a sub-basement for secret, clandestine experiments… right under FBI headquarters? Accessible only by secret codes? Really? Even for this show, that’s a silly stretch. It also leads to a really cartoonish fight with the Smoking Man which is entirely out of a different


It also leads to a really cartoonish fight with the Smoking Man which is entirely out of a different series and didn’t sit well at all. What’s a shame is that the central mystery–involving a piece of AI technology which may be crushing people inside clothing they wear–is quite clever and unique, but it’s dealt with in a jarring manner. Ironically, it doesn’t have enough time to breathe.


‘All Choked Up’ is probably my least favorite tale in Secret Agendas because it simply doesn’t feel personal and befitting to Mulder and Scully, that it could have been ported into various different shows and tweaked a slightly different way. It lacks that focus, that tonal accuracy, the character voices aren’t always there, Scully’s POV doesn’t seem to have much point, and there are one or two plot holes that stood out (why, Skinner, did you care so much about Curlie?). While I admire the attempt, this one falls short.

Rating: 4/10


Thexcastblog.wordpress.com

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 9 Jan - 10:15


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 16 Jan - 3:18

REVIEW – The X-Files: Secret Agendas – ‘Along the Scenic Route’

JANUARY 16, 2017 ~ TONY BLACK

Tony Black looks at the fourteenth story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘Along the Scenic Route’…




Written by Lucy A. Snyder


Edited by Jonathan Maberry


The penultimate story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas is more of an aside from Lucy A. Snyder than a full-on case itself, as ‘Along the Scenic Route’ which Mulder & Scully take on their way back from events of the episode, ‘The List’ (placing this roughly around early Season Three), sees them stumbling in on problems in a small-town possessed it appears by strange visions with fatalistic results. Snyder from the outset presents this more as a consequence of Mulder & Scully constantly being drawn to the paranormal and has some fun playing up on the idea for once they’re not actually desperate to hang around and investigate.


Events spiral mostly around Susie Rainwater, a young girl suffering intense headaches, as the townsfolk in Tilton are seeing strange angels or devils or snakes across town, which could be hallucinogenic manifestations based on mold spores harvested from the Rainwater farm, but which could also connect back to Native American legends of sacred ground. Snyder’s story to an extent shares some DNA with ‘Teso Dos Bichos’ (don’t worry, it’s better!) or in some ways ‘Shapes’, that idea of the ignorant white man looking to stamp all over ancient tradition and culture. That lies at the heart of the story and while the pantomime thuggery of said white man is a little on the nose for The X-Files, the ambiguity behind what could be causing this is welcome.


It’s really Scully who cooks up most of the theory in this one, the scientific theory, for what may be going on, while Mulder doesn’t particularly leap to too many conclusions; Snyder just leaves dangling a few possibilities as to what the cause might be, and it’s not the kind of story which has a Mulder theory that ties everything up in a little bow. It becomes clear that Susie may be the primary catalyst for the weirdness but, again, the specific reasons are left open to debate. Snyder characterizes well along the way – she captures Scully’s scientific rigor & Mulder’s louche wit well, while Susie’s childlike approach, when written in her POV, helps alleviate some of the cliched elements of the story.


A simple, well-told and decently written tale, ‘Along the Scenic Route’, wedging itself within X-Files continuity without falling into the trap of needing too heavily to connect back to the overarching mythos or tap into the lead characters psychology. Lucy A. Snyder simply tells a solid, interesting and open-ended short story effectively, and that makes it a welcome addition to Secret Agendas.


Look out for an exclusive interview this week with Lucy A. Snyder about her story.


Rating: 7/10


Thexcastblog.wordpress.com

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 16 Jan - 3:52


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by sir on Mon 23 Jan - 10:08





THE X-FILES: SECRET AGENDAS – ‘Grandmother Black Hands’ – Review

ByTony BlackPosted on 23rd January 2017


We take a look at the fifteenth and final story in The X-Files: Secret Agendas anthology, ‘Grandmother Black Hands’…

Written by Weston Ochse

Edited by Jonathan Maberry

Perhaps by chance, perhaps not, but The X-Files: Secret Agendas saves the best until last for its final tale, ‘Grandmother Black Hands’, by Weston Ochse. While admittedly it’s a little unfortunate that the episode features the white man vs Indians issue straight after ‘Along the Scenic Route’ which covered similar ground, and the nitpicker in me noted the 2002 setting for this story doesn’t work canonically, this short story is slightly longer than many of the others and is a pretty rousing, superbly written and often very creepy tale with an excellent central supernatural McGuffin, based very much on true documented legends.

Principally that of famed frontiersman Kit Carson, who became as much of a self-aggrandised legend in his own lifetime by all accounts as a real guy, and who serves as Ochse’s jumping off point to weave, even in a tight amount of pages, a surprisingly epic story of a blood moon, an old curse, and the kind of supernatural mystery which drags Mulder off book and down the kind of rabbit hole he loved chasing. Set just before Thanksgiving (appropriately), Ochse captures Scully’s reluctance not to be relaxing alone in New England, forced to bail Mulder out of bogus charges, really well and knows just how to play the believer/sceptic back and forth between these two.

It’s great to see Mulder so impassioned about something that isn’t related at all to the mytharc as well, which he did often get in episodes of the TV show; here it’s the opportunity to save a life before it’s taken, unlike as he admits how they often arrive once the person has died, and that’s a neat angle Scully can’t refute. That sense of Mulder’s determination really carries Ochse’s involving story on its back, one despite that filled with a mix of white man corporate disregard, a clash of Apache generations with the superstitious old guard and the younger, more pragmatic era, and some geographical mystery thrown in for good measure. Once we reach Ochse’s strange, eerily described climax, you’ll be wishing this was an episode of the show we could see visually.

The best short stories in the IDW compilations are often those which you believe could make strong novels with a little more bulking up, and Secret Agendas ends in ‘Grandmother Black Hands’ with one such example. Thanks to some excellent, evocative writing from Weston Ochse, the spirit of The X-Files is impressively captured in a story with depth around the usual creepy supernatural elements. Very pleasing that the newest IDW collection has ended on a flourish.

Blackholemedia

_________________


Thank you Maria!
avatar
sir
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 100670
Age : 47
Your favorite David's role : Hank Moody and Fox Mulder
Registration date : 2007-05-07

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by jade1013 on Mon 23 Jan - 10:08


_________________
Credit to original photographer, poster, scanner, site & anyone I may have missed in between



avatar
jade1013
Pix Queen

Number of posts : 108984
Age : 52
Registration date : 2007-04-27

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: X-FILES TP TRUST NO ONE (PROSE)

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 3 of 3 Previous  1, 2, 3

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum