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2x04 - Revolution 1

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jun - 3:27

Aquarius recap: 'Revolution 1'

Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination sets off a chain reaction


Aquarius
Season 2, Ep. 4 | Aired Jun 23
Posted June 24 2016

Aquarius just collided with history: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has been assassinated, and unlike the war or the looming presidential election, there’s no turning off the TV to tune this out. King’s death sets off a series of race riots across America; as tension builds in Los Angeles, the LAPD and the Panthers can agree that they don’t want to see the city burn, but that’s about where their common ground ends. Consider the Shafe household divided.

Courtesy of the FBI, the Panthers’ phone lines are down, so Commissioner Garrick sends Sam and Shafe to deliver a message: He wants the Panthers to agree not to riot. They’re on board for that part, but they don’t appreciate being asked to cooperate with any action that already has the support of black separatist Richard Tendaji. Bunchy hates Tendaji — he sees him as an FBI puppet. Shafe doesn’t help the situation. When Sam is called out to a murder scene, Shafe is left to hand over the commissioner’s letter on his own, putting his wife on the spot.

Kristin figures the LAPD sent her husband because they knew she associated with the Panthers (and she’s right), which makes her feel exposed. Shafe only makes it worse. He keeps telling her to go home, and he won’t give her any details about Panther HQ surveillance, claiming “official police business.” Bunchy didn’t even know that Kristin was married to a cop in the first place. When Shafe says that avoiding riots is “all the commissioner is requesting,” he hands Bunchy the last straw. “Your so-called officers of the peace don’t make requests of my people,” Bunchy declares, tearing up the commissioner’s letter. “You beat us, and you kill us.”

The unrest is growing in Watts, where a young black woman named Louisa Burnside is found murdered. Her cousin Steve says that he saw Jeff Snyder — a white man whose father, Moses, is Louisa’s boss and landlord — fleeing the scene after calling the LAPD. Jeff liked Louisa, who lived with Steve and his mother until Jeff practically gifted her an apartment in the same building; Steve suggests that his cousin rejected Jeff, and he killed her for it. But Louisa was dead long before Steve claims to have seen Jeff running away (“Although coming back to the scene and pretending to discover the body is the stupid kind of s— that killers do all the time”), and Sam can tell that Steve is hiding something.

The pressure is on Sam from all sides: Moses, a millionaire slumlord and prominent Reagan supporter with a lot of pull in the precinct, insists that his son is innocent, but the neighborhood is already convinced that the LAPD is trying to protect a white killer. Sam’s job doesn’t get any easier when he gets word that Louisa was three months pregnant. Jeff is the father; Steve and his mother, Clarissa, have been hiding Jeff from the crowd outside since he found Louisa’s body. But there’s a lot that Clarissa doesn’t know, starting with the pregnancy and ending with the murderer. Steve killed Louisa — he had feelings for her, and he didn’t take it well when she told him that she and Jeff were having a baby.

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Speaking of couples in trouble, Kristin isn’t happy with Shafe for his behavior with the Panthers. (“You show up like you’re God’s gift to the world, ordering me around.”) She wants him out of the house tonight, but Shafe begs his way back to sleeping on the couch. There’s obviously a storm brewing for these two, but when Sam cracks Louisa’s case, the Shafes can at least agree that the LAPD will need Bunchy’s help if they expect to arrest a black man for her murder. Bunchy rides with Steve to the station and hands him over to Sam. In exchange, Sam makes a few promises. Commissioner Garrick has to persuade Tendaji to join the Panthers’ boycott, and Moses has to convince white business owners to give their black employees the day off in King’s honor. Moses is on board — he’s so on board that he practically blackmails Garrick into upholding his end of the deal — and the city doesn’t riot. There’s even a march of unity at Sam’s suggestion. The man has layers.

The only person not happy about peace in Los Angeles is Charlie, who would have put money on a race war if he believed in capitalism. He’s at Dennis’ place watching the news coverage like it’s a game that he illegally bet on, and he’s got thousands of dollars on the line but has to pretend to only care the usual amount. But Charlie has never successfully pretended to keep his cool about anything. He doesn’t even realize that Dennis and his friends might not want to see civilization burn. Emma outlines Charlie’s plan to Dennis, but “cleanse the world for the Family to remake the world” doesn’t sound like such a groovy idea to him, so she lies that it’s not so much Charlie’s plan as it is a terrible “nightmare” of a vision. And that’s all Dennis needs to keep making out with her.

When it’s clear from the news that Los Angeles is going to keep the peace, Charlie almost loses it, charging Sadie and pulling a knife on Tex. Emma talks him down, whispering that he should at least act like he doesn’t want a race war long enough to meet with Dennis’ big-time music producer friend, so Charlie twitches his way through the unity march at Dennis’ side. I was expecting Charlie to catch Sam on the news coverage, but this is so much better: Sam is out there quietly making him miserable, and neither one of them realizes it.

Meanwhile, Charmain is still trying to work Roy for all he’s got. She talks him into taking her along to meet with Wells, arguing that Wells will respect Roy more once he’s seen her. Charmain spins it like she’s arm candy, then seizes control of the meeting as soon as she’s in the room. It works. Wells is so impressed that he meets with her alone — but while Charmain takes the opportunity to talk up Shafe’s services as a dealer, Wells takes the opportunity to put his hand up her pants. The next night, Wells continues to be terrible when Charmain takes Shafe to meet with him in secret: He forces Shafe to sample his product.

Shafe argues that he doesn’t do drugs, but when he shoots himself up, Wells comments that it’s “just like riding a bike.” Is Shafe a recovering addict, or is that just Wells’ view of the world? In any case, this isn’t going to be a one-time thing; we see Shafe in Sharon Tate’s house in 1969, getting high to deal with the murder scene. Emma’s St. Christopher medal has him especially unhinged. Back in 1968, Shafe is fidgety and disheveled after his night with Wells. He tells Charmain that Wells wants to go into business with him and kill Roy; rather than take this to Cut, they confide in Sam.

As far as Sam is concerned, Roy is just collateral damage. Sam’s only interest right now is in saving his son, and he’s worried that time is running out — not only has Walt been moved to solitary confinement, but the military has tacked on a mutiny charge. Never mind that it’s hard to incite a rebellion when you never get to talk to anyone. Reasoning that Walt could be killed if they don’t find enough information on Wells to hold over the military, Sam asks Charmain to sacrifice Roy in order to maintain her cover, but Roy is “a human being to [her] now,” and she can’t do it. She won’t watch someone die for a scheme that might not work. It’s a fair point, but it’s still cold, and it might not be the best police work, either. You can’t go undercover if you’re not willing to make the tough sacrifices.

Adding injury to insult, Charmain’s plan to save Roy might not even work. She whips out her badge as soon as Wells draws his gun on Roy, but he doesn’t take her seriously — and when Sam and Shafe roll in, guns drawn (does Charmain not have a gun?), Wells takes a shot anyway. Roy, bullet in his chest, yells that Charmain is a “bitch,” Shafe has developed a drug habit for an undercover gig that’s already blown, and they’re no closer to saving Walt. But Sam takes Charmain’s face in his hands and tells her that she’s doing a great job, so at least the Hollywood division’s most functional relationship is still going strong.

Bit and pieces:

Lucille has been found dead; did Roy kill her?

Shafe is really insistent that Kristin isn’t a Panther.

I almost didn’t recognize 1969 Shafe. Suit? Haircut? He shaved?

“Sam wants me to be a cop. Sometimes I think he’s the only one around here who’s man enough to let me be a real cop and not a coffee cop.”

For someone so grumpy about the next generation, Sam is really good with young cops.

“Well, I respect her. And I’m happy for you, because after a kid things can get pretty stale in the bedroom, but Kristin in a beret and leather? Oh.”

“I’m just — I like learning new words.”

“Like your outfit.”

“Hodiak’ll take you in. He already knows you’re a fool. I just found out today.”

Ew.com

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jun - 3:35


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Fri 24 Jun - 3:56


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jun - 4:21



Link for download

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Fri 24 Jun - 4:21


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jun - 11:06


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Fri 24 Jun - 11:09


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Fri 24 Jun - 21:05

‘Aquarius’ S2: E04 ‘Revolution 1’ Review


Aquarius (TV Series) (2015)
As Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated, Hodiak (David Duchovny) is tasked with working a case in a black neighborhood while trying to prevent a riot. Shafe (Grey Damon) begins to experience marital problems as his wife becomes more involved with the Black Panthers. Charmaine (Claire Holt) discovers how much undercover work can cost her after spending last week’s triple episode premiere investigating drug dealers from the inside.






**Spoiler Alert**



This review contains spoilers for S2E04 of Aquarius. If you haven’t yet watched, read at your own risk.


The Good

Shafe gets a flashforward. We see a few marital problems for Shafe in the present storyline as the Black Panthers take up a larger presence in his family, but it looks like that might just be the tip of the iceberg. While we saw Emma and the rest of Charlie’s family in last week’s flashforward, tonight’s focuses on Shafe and his, surprisingly, drug use. Of course, by the time we get to the end of the episode, we find out he does heroin to keep his cover and to help Charmaine on her drug case, but it’s clear that’s not going to go well for him in the future. We also see that Shafe might have also done something very, very, bad since he’s covered in blood and he’s also got a necklace that looks like a similar saint’s pendant to the one Emma had last week.


Framing the episodes with the flashforward. Now, because of the way the premiere was aired, I don’t know if the first three episodes were structured the same way and I just didn’t notice it, but I love that the decision was made to tease the future at the opening and closing of the episode. Just giving the audience a taste without bouncing back and forth between the future and the present storyline too much makes me even more curious about the path Shafe is on.

Bunchy returns. I wish Gaius Charles wasn’t quite such an in demand actor. Because then he could be a series regular on the show. I love Charles and his addition to the show as a Black Panther party leader. Given that Shafe’s wife Kristen is so involved with the local branch, I hope we’ll see more of him this season.

Charmaine is a careful sidestepper. She’s intelligent and quick on her feet as usual, but Roy almost catches Charmain in a lie about her father. It’s got to get harder and harder to keep your cover story straight when you’re making it up as you go along, and it’s amazing that Charmaine has stayed safe with Roy as long as she has.




Shafe and Kristin’s big blow up. Kristin, upset with Shafe for telling her to go home in the middle of Black Panther headquarters, accuses him of treating her as less than he would treat a white woman. She reminds him that she’s his wife. Shafe, not realizing that he treated her badly, was trying to do his job, and he apologizes, wanting to prevent her from kicking him out. It’s a moment where neither of them are able to see the other side of the argument, neither of them are completely in the wrong, but neither of them are right either. I have a feeling things will get much worse for them based on the flashforward we saw, but I can’t help but hope the two of them work it out.


Hodiak always looks beyond the obvious. In the 1960s, especially in the wake of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, the idea of a black family sheltering a young white man that others suspected of killing a young black girl would not have occurred to 90% of detectives. The 60s were a racist and close minded time on one end of the spectrum, and as much as Hodiak is stuck in the past in some ways, as we saw in season one, when it comes to race, he’s progressive for his time. He’s always able to see the bigger picture and look beyond the first step that the other officers working with him would see.


The Bad

Hodiak’s wife interrupts the episode to bring the family drama. The storyline about Hodiak’s son was the storyline that bored me the most in season one. I understand it’s a reflection of the time in which the show is set, but it already does such a good job with the racial conflicts and the Manson storyline that we don’t need the Walt storyline pulling from the screen time for the other two. If the show did one or two of these at a time instead of trying to throw them all in the same episode, it would work better.


The Questions

Will Emma ever see her parents again? We didn’t see them this week, and Emma is firmly entrenched in Charlie’s family now. So much so that she’s able to calm him down just before he goes off while everyone else looks on in horror. I can’t help but wonder if she’ll cross paths with them before the fateful murder spree.


What does Shafe do? Does he kill someone? Does he deliver Emma’s baby? Was he somehow connected to whatever’s ahead for Charlie and his family? Or does what happens to Shafe in the future connect to his relationship with his wife?


Will Roy survive his gunshot? Charmaine, to prevent excess death (and because she’s somehow started to care about Roy), decides to reveal she’s an undercover cop and arrest both men instead of allowing Roy to be killed and getting deeper into the drug ring. Roy ends up hit by a bullet anyway though, and repeatedly tells Charmaine he’s going to kill her. If he survives, she better watch out.



Grading the episode: I enjoyed this episode even more than all three of the episodes that made up the season premiere combined, and it barely even touched on the Manson family aspect of the show. I very much enjoy the show exploring other aspects of the 60s and allowing the audience to see how it connects to Charlie’s future plans. B+

The Movie Net Work

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Fri 24 Jun - 21:10


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Sat 25 Jun - 4:15




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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Sat 25 Jun - 4:20


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Sat 25 Jun - 12:18

King's Assassination and 5 Times Last Night’s Aquarius Had Us Pulling Out the History Books
(Episode 2.04, “Revolution 1”)

By Katherine Siegel  |  June 24, 2016



So, you say you want a revolution… Well just make sure you’re prepared for the docudrama that your exploits may inspire years later.

Aquarius makes no argument that it exists firmly within the realm of historical fiction, and for the most part it may seem pretty easy to spot when the show is, well, making it up. Still there are moments where the fictional tales of Hodiak, Emma, Shafe and Charmain blur the line between historical embellishment and historical falsehood. Here are the five moments that sent us diving for our history books in last night’s episode of Aquarius.

1. “They did it. They finally did it. They shot King.”


Of course we all know that this, unfortunately, is all too true. On April 4,1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated by James Earl Ray just outside room 306 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee.

What may come as a surprise is how accurate Aquarius is with not just the actual facts of King’s assassination, but in incorporating those facts into last night’s plot. For example, the police commissioner sends Shafe and Hodiak to talk to Bunchy, with a strong warning that sunset is approaching within the hour. This is a very well executed nod to the fact that King passed away in the evening at 5:05pm. Sunset coming at about 6:30pm in L.A. means that not only is this an accurate timeline, but also serves as a great way to increase tension, without distorting the truth.

On a larger scale we have the riots. Over 100 cities in the Untied States broke out into riots following King’s death. With cities like Chicago, Baltimore and Washington D.C. on the list, it may be a little bit hard to believe that Los Angeles was able to avoid the destruction. Surprisingly, that’s absolutely true. While many cities experienced devastating violence as a result of the outpouring of grief and frustration many felt after King’s murder, Los Angeles was spared. A joint effort between the Los Angeles Police Department and community organizers like the Black Panther Party kept violence to a minimum. It was a bit more of a group effort than just sending our two wayward heroes down to Watts for the day, but I guess we can forgive them a little logic leap for the sake of dramatic tension.


2. Jeff Schneider and Louisa Burnside

Ahhhh, young love… and the murder that television loves telling us is so often the outcome. With as emotionally grounded and socially complex a story as Louisa Burnside’s murder provides, you wouldn’t be foolish for thinking there might be at least a little bit of historical accuracy to this story.

It certainly matches up with the social complexities and tensions of the time. But despite the Law & Order feel to this plot line, it was not in fact ripped from the headlines. As far as we can tell, there was never a Louisa Burnside or Jeff Schneider, nor was there any incident like the one depicted at the time our story is set. So, while this plot may be effective storytelling, a story is all it is.


3. Richard Tendaji and the UA

This one’s a bit more complicated. While Bunchy Carter and the Black Panther Party are very much a reality, the newly mentioned Richard Tendaji and his organization the UA, well, aren’t. So why invent a rival nationalist group?

Likely Aquarius is using Tendaji and the UA as a stand in for the Panthers’ real life rival. In Southern California, the Panthers often found themselves at odds with Organization Us. Founded by Ron Karenga and often referred to as simply US—US, UA? Do you see what I see?—they often competed with the Panthers for potential members, though their aims and tactics were different in the extreme. Tensions escalated between the two groups consistently during the late ‘60s, often with a little added assistance from the FBI, before coming to a head in January of 1969. We won’t delve further here, except to give you the gentle warning of spoilers, really soooooo many spoilers.

4. Captain Welles and Heroine Smuggling


Well first off, like Charmain and Roy, Captain Welles is a completely fictional character. Unfortunately, the crisis he represents was not. With many soldiers returning from Vietnam with newly developed heroin addictions, more than one greedy, morally dubious military veteran began smuggling the drugs in from the area, often referred to as the Golden Triangle. What’s even more disturbing is that these drugs were often smuggled into the United States in the body bags and coffins of dead soldiers. And while solid proof may be lacking, there’s a lot of evidence and speculation that Hodiak’s suspicions about CIA and government involvement may very well be true. Pretty insidious stuff. But perhaps not as insidious as…



5. Charlie Manson and Racism. Just really so much racism.

“Are you saying Charlie wants a race war?” Well, yes. Yes, Dennis Wilson, you’ve nailed it in one. Though I would have thought that was obvious when you watched him praying for Martin Luther King Jr. to die. That and all the incoherent ranting. So much incoherent ranting.

Most anyone with a passing knowledge of Manson can tell you that on top of being a violent misogynist, narcissist, and all around not great guy his fanatical racism pretty much drove his vision of “Helter Skelter.” So you say you want a revolution? Well if you’re Emma, Sadie, Tex, Patty, or Dennis you’d better pay a bit more attention to what Charlie is preaching. I’m pretty sure it’s not exactly Beatles approved.

Pastemagazine.com

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Sat 25 Jun - 12:41

AQUARIUS on NBC s2e4 “Revolution 1” (Recap)
Posted on June 25, 2016 by Frasier

AQUARIUS on NBC s2e4 Revolution 1 recap and review

AUGUST 10 1969  – 12:12am He looks less like a hippie now, but Brian Shafe is more messed up than ever. Clean shaven Shafe finds his charm necklace at the crime scene before shooting up some Heroin.

CUT TO 16 month earlier – (Damages Style), The Brian we all know and love is very concerned for Charmain when Hodiak yells, ‘THEY DID IT’ Martin Luther King has been shot.



CUT TO Black Panthers Headquarters. Is that Mrs. Shafe with Bunchy? HOLDING HANDS?

CUT TO Charlie watching Dennis kiss Emma. “Die, Die, Die” “He’s praying!” Charlie’s family not the swiftest.



More happens in this show before the title slate than most shows in an full hour!aquariousdavidduchovny



“I need your office. I don’t need you.”  Commissioner has little respect for Cutler.

Hodiak and Shafe are on Black Panther Duty. Hodiak has past relations, while Shafe’s wife is more current. Yeah, this will end well.



Hodiak, already upset about news that Waaaaaaaaalt is in solitary and unreachable due to his beating up a Latina inmate and being trans-gendered. Oh wait, that later part was #OITNB, which I watched earlier same evening.

On the way to the Panthers, Hodiak catches a case. A black woman is murdered, with a white suspect and Hodiak is Mr. Sensitivity, so of course he is the right call.

Meanwhile Charmain continues to work Roy, via shoulder massage. Charmain reveals she is an army brat. Roy recalls a different story for her daddy. Charmain reconciles stories. Roy bites.  “I like my men dumb.” Don’t we all.

Brian rolls up on Panther headquarters. Bunchy is not happy to find out Kristen’s white husband is also a cop. Race riot almost becomes a domestic dispute situation.

Charmain meets the big boss while revealing who has the brains in that couple. Roy does prove to be a great burger gofer, “All the way.”

Shafe fails to get the Panthers on board. Shafe leaves alone. Wait, who is with the daughter now?

Charmain gets up close and personally violated by the kingpin before Roy returns with lunch.

Emma and Dennis look scared while Charlie is celebrating the rioting due to the MLK assassination. Sadie just wants to get high with Tex. Everyone leaves as Charlie makes it so hard to hear the TV.

Hodiak learns a new word while LA starts to boil. “I knew right away” this guy is so guilty as we learn his dead cousin (Ms. Burnside – NOT MAME, apparently) is not really his cousin.

non-consanguineous – (Adjective) Non (not) Consanguinity (“con- (with/together) sanguine (blood) -ity (noun marker)”) refers to the property of being from the same lineage as another person. In that respect, consanguinity is the quality of being descended from the same ancestor as another person.

The commissioner calls Hodiak at home to put the pressure on to solve the murder and calm the Panthers.

“I like your outfit” regarding Hodiak’s topless nature, Opal shares the opinion of many female fans, and a few male ones too, before breaking down. “No one is holding him.” She knows Walt is in the army now, right?

The commissioner spends a lot of time on the phone getting real cops to do his dirty work. This time with Shafe. “Tell your wife she can save lives.” Kristen is not having it and kicks Shafe out.. “I’m not your N-, I’m your wife. The mother of your child”,  OK Brian, you can take the couch.




SNYDER! Racial are terms tough, even as a period piece. N words, SHF word (Jewish/Yiddish version of N Word), Hodiak endures his schmeckle thinking…

The schmeckle is a form of currency in some dimensions. It is encountered for the first time in the Thirsty Step in the episode Meeseeks and Destroy. Rick and Morty’s waitress says to other patrons that her boob job cost 25 schmeckles.

OOPS, wrong SCHMECKLE –  Yiddish term for penis (URBAN DICTIONARY)

“NAKED WE ARRIVE, NAKED WE SURVIVE” – Charlie gets the team ready to flee for the desert. “CLEANSE THE WORLD SO THE FAMILY CAN REMAKE THE WORLD” Dennis is clearly beginning to feel uncomfortable with Emma’s devotion to Charlie.



Hodiak learns Ms. Burnside was 3 months pregnant before he finds baby Snyder. Apparently the projects are a tough place to hide, especially for a young white schmeckle. Hodiak fails to get the truth, but young Burnside cracks under his mother’s torture.

Brian fails but Kristen finally gets Bunchy to help calm the city, and escorting the murderer out of the building. Bunchy has a condition. Bunchy gets the city’s first MLK day-off.


FYI BUNCHY IS REAL – SPOILER ALERT

Forty-five years ago last week, two young members of the Black Panther Party, Alprentice “Bunchy” Carter and John Huggins, were slain on the campus of UCLA. Students at the time, Carter and Huggins were shot during a meeting about the formation of a black studies department. The killings at Campbell Hall appeared to be a flashpoint in a supposed power struggle between the Panthers and the Maulana “Ron” Karenga-led group, Us. The FBI, under J. Edgar Hoover, however, was keen to exploit and heighten tensions between the groups before the incident.

Charlie hates that the city does not explode. Emma talks him off the cliff before taking anger out on Tex. His dreams of a musical career are still enough to take Charlie’s mind off the crazy.

Charmain brings Brian to meet the kingpin.

Walt gets charged with mutiny for leading a prison riot.

Kingpin gets Brian to taste the product. Rabbit hole presented. I don’t think that’s a bike he is riding down.

Boy, this show bounces around.

Hopped-up Brian and Charmain discuss Roy’s future. Cutler interrupts with more ignorance. Charmain does not like Hodiak’s plan to let Roy fall and become a casualty so he can save Walt.

“You own me commissioner. I will collect.” While Richard Tendaji is not a real character, he appears to represent Maulana “Ron” Karenga. (See above aside)

The foreshadowing is heightened as we see Charlie and Dennis protest marching.

Wells does not believe Charmain is really a cop. “You bitch. I’m going to kill you.” Roy doesn’t appreciate all that Charmain has done to save his life.

AUGUST 10 1969 12:17am – Covered in blood, Shafe calls Hodiak.



See you THURSDAY 10am EST on NBC  for 2.5
Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey

Duchovniacs.com

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by jade1013 on Sat 25 Jun - 12:43


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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

Post by sir on Sun 26 Jun - 4:43

Aquarius – Season 2, Episode 4: “Revolution 1”






NBC’s Aquarius
Season 2, Episode 4: “Revolution 1”
Directed by Timothy Busfield
Written by Rafael Yglesias



At the scene of the Cielo Drive killings in ’69, a more clean cut Brian Shafe (Grey Damon) does a stutter step by finding the little medallion we’ve seen before from under a couch, then settling in to do some heroin. Really? Mysterious, cryptic. Incredibly interesting.

16 months earlier. Detective Shafe is worried about Officer Charmain Tully (Claire Holt) still being undercover, and unofficially. Well there are troubles elsewhere: Martin Luther King Jr. has bee assassinated. 

Everyone is watching. Especially the Black Panthers and Bunchy Carter (Gaius Charles).


Cutler: “He dies, Watts is gonna burn.”
Hodiak: “He dies, America is gonna burn.”




Everyone at the Wilson place hears the news, too. Charlie Manson (Gethin Anthony) doesn’t have the same reaction as the others. He looks almost thrilled: “That‘s far out,” he exclaims before running to the television. At the police station, Hodiak and Cutler (Chance Kelly) are receiving their marching orders for what’s about to happen. They have to try and keep “a lid” on the whole racial boiling pot out there. What’s intriguing is the link Shafe has to the Panthers, due to his wife Kristin (Milauna Jackson) being involved with the party. For all Hodiak’s lawlessness as a lawman, he doesn’t seem prejudiced like some of the others, which we saw lots of in Season 1.

Naturally, the streets are all but on fire. The African American community is raging. There’s a dead black woman that Hodiak is trying to look into, and there’s a riot brewing outside. Hodiak keeps the white uniforms out to try and assuage people. Not sure how long it’ll last.


Meanwhile, Charmain is still playing Roy Kovic (David Meunier). It’s only a matter of time before something slips. Spend too long being undercover, things might get crazy. There is only so long a rookie can handle themselves. Or maybe Charmain will surprise us all. She cons her way into going to a meeting with Roy, that gets her closer to whatever business he’s dealing in. Then there’s Shafe, he’s down at the Black Panther Party HQ to see his wife. Everything gets a little heated, as she’s not exactly thrilled the police commissioner knows about her involvement with the party. Still, Bunchy isn’t a reactionary; he’s a revolutionary. I like his level head, though cool heads can’t always prevail. He isn’t exactly willing to work with the police. Also, he doesn’t want rioting. Not because of the cops, because he knows it will harm the black community and their credibility. At the very same time things aren’t so hot between Kristin and Brian.

Wilson isn’t so thrilled about Manson and his raving. Nobody’s too into it and the party has a dying buzz. All except for Charlie. He is frightening, watching the television and relishing the cities all but burning to the ground.



Opal (Jodi Harris) shows up at Sam’s place, worried to death about their son Walt (Chris Sheffield). He does his best to calm her down, though it’s understandable her worry. In the meantime, Brian has troubles, as well. Not only his wife, but with the commissioner. He’s torn in all directions. He doesn’t want to fail at his job, nor does he want to fail with his wife. Except Kristin comes home, raging about MLK, how Brian treated her at the BPP HQ, and throws him out: “You think I‘m your nigga to boss around? You think I‘m your nigga? I‘m not your nigga. I am your wife, the mother of your child.” He begs her not to go. She agrees – sleep on the couch and maybe tomorrow things won’t be so bad. Maybe.

Well over at the Wilson place, Charlie is ready to head for the desert. The Manson Family members are so brainwashed. Poor Dennis is caught up in the midst of it and starts seeing how strange, dangerous, devilish Manson is behind the hippy-ish exterior when one of the girls rambles on about the supposed coming race war.

Hodiak is still taking care of business with the Watts madness. He tracks down Snyder, the man they were looking for, and finds him hiding with the aunt of his dead girlfriend, the dead black girl. There are a few issues that Sam sorts out. Seems the cousin Steve has been hiding things of his own. An accidental death, but a murder nonetheless.

Trying to get things settled with the BPP, and his wife, Shafe is trying to do things “the righteous way” for it all to go smooth. Bunchy makes sure things pass right at the station and gets Sam to ensure African Americans in the city get a day off due to King’s death. All sewn up. That doesn’t bode well for Manson, whose ideas of a race war are foiled. This is great writing and helps us begin to understand how Charlie’s moving towards spurring on the race war himself.


In the undercover world of cops, Charmain introduces Brian to the man she met earlier through Kovic. Brian does a nice job playing himself up, talking about his service in the war and so on. Problem being this guy wants Brian to get high, to prove himself. Gotta try it if you wanna sell it, right? Well, the young cop shoots up, heading to the sky. Uh oh. At least they can get further into the case. But at what cost?
People march the streets in solidarity, black and white, all for Martin Luther King Jr. Even ole Charlie heads down to walk, holding his hands together praying; not for the deceased King, but for a race war. An eerie moment. Everyone sings “Amazing Grace” and it is simply chilling. Across town, Roy is about to be murdered and Charmain finally pulls out her badge. The biker gets a bullet anyway, threatening to kill Charmain. For now, it’s all over.


Skip to August 10th, 1969 – a bloody, high Shafe calls his partner: “We‘re in trouble, Sam.”



Whoa. Great finisher.

I’m really excited to see where Shafe plays into this and how his trajectory ends up taking him to that point we saw at the beginning and end of this episode. Next one is titled “Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey” and I want you to stick with me, and with Aquarius. This season is a big improvement on an already decent show.

Fathersonholygore.com

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Re: 2x04 - Revolution 1

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